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Thread: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

  1. #1
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    Default To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Let's really hash this one out.

    The boat we're talking about is a 1/4" bead and cove glued Cedar strip version of Grant's Virginia, a 16' Adirondack Guideboat with 52 laminated spruce ribs (26 pairs). It is being built under the instruction of John Michne's new book, "Building an Adirondack Guideboat: Reproductions of a Unique Regional Classic".

    This boat will be taken out in Lake Washington and other lakes around the Pacific Northwest, possibly a river or two.

    In the book it states very clearly that fiberglass is unnecessary, whether you are planking the boat traditionally or with Cedar strip. The claim is that the ribs offer more than enough strength to the hull, and if your joints are tight then there is no need. It also mentions that since cedar strip canoes are always built with fiberglass, it was easy to originally assume that fiberglass was required by association.

    He also stresses that even if fiberglass is added, the risk of delamination is very high due to moisture not being able to evaporate from one side, leading to a boat that doesn't last all that long.

    These boats have been made with no fiberglass for over 150 years.

    I'm still on the fence. I want a boat that will last long and be strong and reliable. I'm not opposed to maintenance. I do prefer keeping fiberglass away from wood unless it needs it. If I'm building something out of wood, the wood better being doing the work, otherwise it feels all too much like a beauty contest. That being said, I also don't want to sink .

    So what do you all think?

    In your response, try to explain exactly why you believe fiberglass is necessary or not for this boat. Whether it be for structural integrity, resistance to scrapes and scratches, for preventing leaks, etc. I'd love to hear your opinions on delamination.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Mizan View Post
    In the book it states very clearly that fiberglass is unnecessary...
    Sounds like the answer is right there in the book. Why do you want to glass it anyway? If it doesn't need fiberglass for strength, you'll just end up with an overbuilt and unnecessarily heavy boat that is less enjoyably to use.

    When I started building my dory a long time ago, I had an inclination to try to overbuild it so it might hold up to the extreme conditions of use and abuse I dreamed might await her. I think it had to do with being 20-something and imaging myself conquering the earth and seas in some kind of adventure fantasy delusion. I now recognize that those conditions are extraordinarily unlikely to occur and wish I'd built it lighter so it would sail faster. It doesn't actually need to be built to withstand a torpedo attack.

    My 2 cents.

    Jeff

    edit: PS, I might add a category to your poll:
    Fiberglassing this boat is not acutely harmful, but may not be useful and is certainly not necessary.
    Last edited by guillemot; 01-08-2019 at 01:17 PM.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    I understand that when strip built canoes are glassed, they are glassed inside and out. The inside glass contributes to the strength of the structure and the outside to abrasion resistance. Also by glassing both sides the wood is equally protected from moisture on both sides. With this build you have ribs contributing strength on the inside, instead of glass. And if you glass only one side moisture can get into the wood from one side but not the other, which will lead to problems. So, glass both sides, or neither.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    For that structure, I don't think you need glass. There is more structure to an AG boat than a skin on frame canoe/kayak, and those are never glassed. So from a structural standpoint, you should be okay without. The only reason I would play with any sort of composite system would be to prevent water infiltration of the core material. For that you don't have to glass but rather give the finished boat 3 coats of a quality epoxy (WEST is pricey, but has never let me down...there are other quality brands out there, but I like to stick with what I know.....after all the time I put into any project, the few dollars saved on lesser epoxy is not worth it....your mileage may vary, and I am sure others on here can recommend other products that will do just as well), applied wet on wet, then as many coats as you care to of a quality spar varnish with UV inhibitors (most all good spar varnishes have this). That should seal the wood from moisture an water infiltration, and result in a boat that will last a good long time.

    Boat designer and WBF member Mic Storer advocates that treatment for his Goat Island Skiff sailboat (on my short list of boats to build, as soon as life allows). The first GIS was built something like 20 years ago, was treated with epoxy inside and out, the interior finished bright with spar varnish, and the exterior painted white with quality paint. Last I had heard, it has yet to be refinished, and looks about like new. Now that is an Okume plywood boat and not cedar strip. But I do believe Okume is more prone to rotting than cedar, so for your guide boat I would think that epoxy to seal everything will do the trick. Save the time, money, and aggrevation of working with and fairing the weave fill coats on the glass.

    Or as my model flying buddy Bill says, "you pays yer money and makes yer choices."

    That's my $.02

  5. #5
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Yeah, if the boat's built with no frames, then you can and should glass inside and out. If you strip over frames, glass is not needed. I'd use CPES as a sealer/primer to keep things nice and stabile. Personally, I'm not wild about thick epoxy coating because it's really nice till it cracks and then it's truly horrible. Some folk like a thin layer of glass set in epoxy for abrasion resistance. It can help but also can have the same problems as a thick epoxy coating. If you do that, be sure to epoxy seal (CPES and then paint or varnish) inside as well.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by guillemot View Post
    I think it had to do with being 20-something and imaging myself conquering the earth and seas in some kind of adventure fantasy delusion.
    I hear that loud and clear. It seems like if I mention that I don't plan on fiberglassing the boat, a few builders come out of the woodwork(no pun intended) very confident in the necessity of fiberglass. Either way the book is what I trust most.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Use a few removable oak rub strips in the areas that will be in contact with the beach. I'm half certain wooden boats don't need glass.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by cglynn View Post
    For that structure, I don't think you need glass. There is more structure to an AG boat than a skin on frame canoe/kayak, and those are never glassed. So from a structural standpoint, you should be okay without. The only reason I would play with any sort of composite system would be to prevent water infiltration of the core material. For that you don't have to glass but rather give the finished boat 3 coats of a quality epoxy
    I like the sound of that. Almost a happy medium between just spar varnish and full on cloth + epoxy.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Too many variables yet, to give an answer.

    How are the strips attached to the frames? Stems?

    Are all the strips full length and width? Will there be stealer strips that land in dead space?

    What glue is to be used on the strips?

    There’s no reason properly applied glass should delaminate. I’ve glassed one side of plenty things.

    Anyway.

    Peace,
    Built A Few Strip Boats, And Glassed A Fair Few
    Screws, most likely Titebond 3, they are full length.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    So, you will be screwing each strip to each frame, and gluing it all with TBIII?

    Does the shape lend itself to full length, full width strips? I’ve never met a canoe or kayak that does. Or rowboat.

    Is there a keel and stems with rabbets? How is that handled with strips and no glass? I’m curious, and learning, as I’ve only done nailed, thicker strips, or glassed thinner strips.

    Peace,
    Robert

    They are 18' 1/4" thick 3/4" wide strips with a bead and cove on them, a la canoe.

    This video should make things much clearer than I can describe. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CXKPkAPHlTE
    Last edited by Mizan; 01-08-2019 at 02:05 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    By full width, I meant the strip retaining its full width during the entire course. Often strips need to be tapered, or stealer strips need to be installed to accommodate the shape of a boat.

    I noticed stealers in the video you linked, and I was wondering how they would hold up with what seems to be limited support for their tapered ends.

    I also wondered how the bottom board to strip joint was handled, since it was stripped from the sheer down to the bottom board.

    Then he glassed the boat...

    Peace,
    Robert
    Keep in mind I haven't stripped the boat yet, but to my knowledge the tapers on the stealer strips are supported enough being glued to the strips around them and resting on the ribs. The book actually mentions that these stealer strips aren't necessary if you strip the boat carefully from sheer to bottom. The bottom board has a rolling bevel that the strips sit on top of. This is really all I can offer for information. Maybe someone who's built one of these can chime in and be of more help.

    Yes quite a few of these boats have been glassed on the outside, including the one in the video.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    I fully understand your dilemma! While others have given you logical opinions I should add that while glassing a cedar hull will protect the wood from abrasion, it should be kept in mind that you are combining two materials of different coefficients of elasticity and the time will come when you will need to make major repairs to seal up cracks in the glass. Any puncture of the skin is a place for water intrusion that cannot escape by normal evaporation and can do more damage than good for your fine little ship! Glassing it will also add a hell of a lot of weight! Balsa wood surf boards experienced the problem prior to the switch to closed cell foam construction.
    Jay

  13. #13
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    If you are going to put 3 coats of epoxy on the outside, you will have to add 3-4 coats of a good varnish for the UV protection. A layer of 4 oz fiberglass cloth between the first 2 coats of epoxy won't add much weight. I don't buy the delamination argument, since the inside will be coated with 3-4 coats of varnish too.
    The guideboats were built without fiberglass and epoxy for a hundred years at least - and some still are. The old style of boats were 1/4 or 3/16" by 4 inch planks beveled on both edges to make a smooth hull. They aren't easy to build that way because of the percise fits required. I think Michne's new book describes both ways.

    I have just finished building a guideboat using Michne's first book - and used the 4 oz fiberglass because he didn't question it in that book. I would use the fiberglass again if I were going to do it again with the bead and cove strips. If I were going to use the 3/16 x 4 inch planking, I would not use the fiberglass or epoxy on the hull.

    If you could manage a trip to the Adirondack Museum at Blue Mt. Lake in NY, you would find it very interesting. After a visit there, you would be thinking about the 4 inch wide planking - it is not easy though. Allison Warner builds guideboats the old way - she is there all summer and builds them right in front of you and answers questions - I think she has finished 9 between her time there and in her own shop. I think her last one was auctioned off for $25,000 at the museum fundraiser. After looking at hers, I almost thought about giving away my woodworking tools and taking up a new hobby, they are that nice. She learned how to do the boats from Robert Frenette, he works at his shop in Tupper Lake, he has a waiting list for his boats. Chris Woodward in Saranac Lake has built about 18, I haven't seen his boats in person, but he has a good website.

    If I were you (and I have no idea about your woodworking abilities), I would think about using the 4' planks with no epoxy or fiberglass.
    Fred

  14. #14
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Interesting photos about new construction. https://www.adkwoodenboats.com/new-a...den-guide-boat Allison and Rob
    Woodwards site. http://www.guideboats.com/

  15. #15
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Schooner36 View Post
    Interesting photos about new construction. https://www.adkwoodenboats.com/new-a...den-guide-boat Allison and Rob
    Woodwards site. http://www.guideboats.com/
    I've had the pleasure of talking to Allison on the phone. I agree her boats are outstanding. I've seen a photo of her roughing out a bottom board with a drawknife, what a badass!

  16. #16
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    As I mentioned in your other thread, Ive built two of these boats. Both with fiberglass/epoxy on the outside. First one completed in 2008. I like the extra security of the glass skin, given the rocky shores of Adirondack glacial lakes where I use it. One has 1/8x~3/8 brass shoes (3 strips running the length of the bottom board). It looks great, but adds quite a bit to the weight. The second boat has white oak shoes. Has worked fine and i Imagine will stand up fine while saving quite a bit of weight.
    Proud but humble member of the LPBC

  17. #17
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    I would have bought the delamination argument due to only one-side glassing back in the days where we used polyester resin, but not with epoxy. This is my 1972 cedar Old Town which is glassed with WEST Epoxy and six ounce E Glass. I maintain the interior so it's not soaking up water and don't store it with water in it. The glass isn't going anywhere and it will have no detrimental effect on the canoe's lifespan with reasonable storage and maintenance.

    guide2-001.jpg

    There is no way in hell that I would just epoxy coat the boat. Without a good mix of reinforcing fibers present, epoxy is pretty brittle. It also goes on lumpy, unlike varnish, and would need serious sanding, followed by varnish to end up with a decent finish. If you planned on adding epoxy to your hull, it is just as lightweight to stick a layer of glass in there to reinforce it. Even so, glass on the outside of a hull will add abrasion resistance, but adds negligible impact strength.

    I would be much more tempted to skip the glass, skip the epoxy, skip the CPES and combine a couple of decent hardwood, brass, or UHMW strips on the bottom board for abrasion protection. That's surely going to be the spot that gets the bulk of the abuse on a guideboat. For the rest of the hull, plain varnished cedar isn't terribly strong or abrasion resistant by any means, but it is by far the easiest surface to repair if you do get any dings.

    This all assumes that you won't have any gaps or weak joints between strips. I've never stripped a guideboat, but I'd be surprised if you can start stripping at the gunwale and end up all hunky dory once you reach the bottom board, but maybe it will work with that much wood thickness to land on down there.

    My major reservation for going glass-less is the fact (and I've built enough strippers to know it's a fact) that some strips are a lot more prone to eventually splitting right down the middle along a weak line in the grain than others are. Thankfully, this usually happens when you are initially applying the strips to the forms, especially in spots where they're getting some twisting strain. The fibers of fiberglass going across the grain of the strips help to reinforce these weak spots once the boat is done and in use. Without it, you can be pretty sure that your boat will have some spots where weak grain structure is present. All those ribs inside will certainly help with this problem, but it is hard to say the extent that they will completely cure it.

    An interesting topic, and I'm not sure there is any stand alone right answer.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    An interesting topic, and I'm not sure there is any stand alone right answer.
    You make some great points. I agree the cedar splitting is something that has worried me. Not just do to weakness but the fact that this type of strip planking inherently doesn't really allow for much expansion and contraction in the wood like a lap does.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Glass the outside with epoxy resin for abrasion resistance. It will cause no more rot or delamination issues than a canvas covered exterior cedar hull. They last decades with care, don't delaminate and rot isn't a problem on painted and varnished interiors. Also, glassing over small ribs with light weight (4oz-10oz) cloth will test your patience at best. Good luck.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    I beginning to think that glass is highly overrated. And in this case, as others have said, what's the point of it after all?
    -Dave

  21. #21
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    This all assumes that you won't have any gaps or weak joints between strips. I've never stripped a guideboat, but I'd be surprised if you can start stripping at the gunwale and end up all hunky dory once you reach the bottom board, but maybe it will work with that much wood thickness to land on down there.
    This is a rare instance where I have more experience than Todd. I strip built one guideboat around 1975, so some details aren't too fresh in my mind, the need for stealers for instance. I can say that there is a lot of surface to land on at the bottom board. I did hit a few rocks over the years. The strips were redwood and the glass was 10 oz. In 1975, there was no one to ask for advice.

    While I think that you will be sorry if you skip the glass, I can't say it with certainty. The experiment will be interesting. I agree with Todd, without glass, skip the epoxy and use only varnish. Rushton built cedar guideboats, so cedar can be used without fiberglass.

    This link may be interesting for traditional construction:
    http://www.adirondack-guideboat.com/...k-to-planking/
    As John Gardner, the small craft historian and boat builder, put it so well in the Durant’s book The Adirondack Guide-Boat: “The perfection and delicacy of guide-boat planking is something to humble a boatbuilder’s pride. In making a guide-boat the chief skill, if not the lion’s share of the labor, was the planking. For this the boatbuilder needed a special aptitude as well as infinite care and patience.”
    Another vote for glass on the outside only with ribs inside: https://adirondack-guide-boat.com/building-wooden-boat/
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  22. #22
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    Another vote for glass on the outside only with ribs inside: https://adirondack-guide-boat.com/building-wooden-boat/
    You make some good points. Did you have hardwood/ brass shoes on the bottom board to protect it?

    AGB uses ribs that are spaced about twice as far apart as they would be traditionally. They are certainly taking into account the extra strength from that glass by using this spacing. If nothing else they are an example that glass on the outside only can be trustworthy, I can't imagine they'd sell these boats for that high price if they thought they'd delaminate.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Schooner36 View Post
    Allison and Rob
    Woodwards site. http://www.guideboats.com/
    Great site for info on ADK Guideboats. Before reading all the info on it, I used to wonder why guideboats were so expensive. After reading the site, especially the construction section, I now wonder how they can sell them so cheap.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Since it is not really a traditionally built Adirondack Guideboat, glassing it would not be a heresy.
    That outfit in Charlotte, Vt (website MN Dave's post) builds them this way. I've been to their shop and they do nice work.
    Some say that not glassing both sides will lead to problems. But really, these boats are not left out in the rain and snow. Most if not all are very protected when not in use.
    Having built 17 boats of all sorts, some glassed, some not, I would go with a light covering of cloth on your boat.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Another quick question. If I do fiberglass it, there is basically no going back, but if I skip it and just lay down several coats of oil based varnish then will it be a possibility in the future to sand down the hull and glass it with success?

  26. #26
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Mizan View Post
    You make some good points. Did you have hardwood/ brass shoes on the bottom board to protect it?

    AGB uses ribs that are spaced about twice as far apart as they would be traditionally. They are certainly taking into account the extra strength from that glass by using this spacing. If nothing else they are an example that glass on the outside only can be trustworthy, I can't imagine they'd sell these boats for that high price if they thought they'd delaminate.
    Strippers normally have glass inside and out. A thin layer of wood has very little transverse strength and stiffness so it needs to be supported to prevent it from splitting. Strippers depend on fiberglass on both sides to stiffen the skin. The ribs in a traditionally built boat provide the transverse strength and stiffness. Using half as many ribs, you may need the glass on the other side. There is always the issue of the integrity of all 800 feet of glue joints. (50 x 16) All the discussion about water and delamination is irrelevant to a boat that spends most of its time out of the water and under cover.

    My guideboat is no guide for anyone building today. I used 10 oz glass, very viscous (cool honey) fast setting epoxy, doubled the glass on the bottom, probably added another foot wide strip along the white pine keel inside and out. Not much need for wear strips.

    It weighs at least 80 lbs. The epoxy had to be spread using both hands on a squeegee and set up in 15 minutes, so I had to work fast and it wasn't very smooth on the inside. The awful epoxy that I used was not as clear as the ones we have now, and it clouded up after a few weeks to the point where the wood grain was hidden. I had to paint the boat. It is functional.

    I built the boat from the lines in Manley's book about Rushton's canoes and the March 1967 issue of Popular Science. There were no books, very few people building strippers and no good way to find them. The industrial supply place where I bought the epoxy had no clue as to what to use for hand layup. I had laid up some fiberglass canoes with my neighbor and we had a roll of 10oz glass. The polyester cost $125 for a 55 gallon drum and epoxy cost maybe five to ten times as much per gallon.

    Having bounced off a few submerged rocks, there was some hidden damage. I don't recommend such heavy glass, but when a loaded boat glances off a submerged rock at 5mph, the wood can be shattered and you will never know on a painted boat until you tap and poke the bottom. The picture below shows a shattered spot on the then 30 year old boat. I ground the feather edge around the repair before peeling the glass off the bad spot. The details of the repair aren't important here, but the damage tolerance may be interesting.
    Capture2.JPG

    This is a picture of a traditionally built boat (c. 1896 Henry Kilborn Martin guide-boat) showing some of the 3000 odd clench nails holding the laps.
    1896-Martin-1.jpg


    More links can be found here: Thread: Guideboat thread?
    Last edited by MN Dave; 01-09-2019 at 12:08 PM. Reason: kitten landed on the keyboard
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  27. #27
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Mizan View Post
    Another quick question. If I do fiberglass it, there is basically no going back, but if I skip it and just lay down several coats of oil based varnish then will it be a possibility in the future to sand down the hull and glass it with success?
    Yes, if you take it down to bare wood.
    -Dave

  28. #28
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    DSC_0217.jpgDSC_0214.jpgDSC_0001.jpg

    Traditional build
    I have been building a small 13'-6" cedar boat, using 3/16th thick Northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) planking.
    8 strakes, red spruce (Picea rubens)natural crook ribs and stems.
    Beveled and tacked lapstrake with dolphinite bedding in the lap.
    It will get oiled (boiled linseed)and varnished (Interlux #90 Original) 4-5 coats outside, 3-4 inside, refinished in 2-3 years then as needed.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    DSC_0075.jpg
    Oiled

    DSC_0082.jpg
    1st coat
    DSC_0085.jpg

    2nd coat.
    Now I will finish off the boat (scrape sand and tack the inside, gunwales, and decks) and then varnish inside and out to a semi/ gloss finish.
    No epoxy
    No glass

  30. #30
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Woodward View Post
    Now I will finish off the boat (scrape sand and tack the inside, gunwales, and decks) and then varnish inside and out to a semi/ gloss finish.
    No epoxy
    No glass
    Truly gorgeous. Awesome to get a post from you.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    There is absolutely no need to glass your boat, as long as you keep several things in mind.
    Old wooden boats leak.
    New wooden boats get old.
    If you take the time to get good fits between your strips, you will make the boat watertight. There will be no reason to then compensate for poor workmanship by adding a waterproof membrane.
    Cove and bead technique will give you plenty of bearing surface to get a good wood to wood joint. A quality water proof glue should make a tight joint. The old strip builds from the late 1890s were edge nailed together.
    If you were to epoxy them together it may hold better and fill and voids. However the epoxied joint is a lot harder then the cedar strip so that when you sand the boat to fair it, you run the risk of sanding away more wood then epoxy, causing a rippling effect.
    Now what you are proposing to build is a whole different craft, although it will be a similar shape. This boat, by the nature of the natural crooks, and the 7 plank bevels is very flexible. Your method.with laminated ribs and a monocoque glued construction will be much stiffer. But with the ribs spaced every 5 1/2 - 6 inch on center, you will have plenty of support. The main reason that strippers are glassed is because there usually is no internal support and the boat oil cans and deflect and deforms.
    An issue I forsee with a stripper that is not glassed is the movement of the wood. There are a lot of pieces that can not move independently of each other but most certainly will want to. Use quarter sawn air-dried material as much as possible. A traditional build has this inherent flexibility so the strakes can move independently of each other.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Adirondack Mts, New York State
    Posts
    482

    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    A non glassed boat needs to live in the boat house. Or as close as you can get. It lives on a rack, dry, out of the sun and not on the ground or full of water. The finish must be kept up, so that bare wood is not exposed. This is no different than the maintenance required for your car. Change the oil, wash it, and don't hit the honey wagon. A boat, with proper care will last better than a hundred years. And the repair work is so much easier with out a hard plastic exterior. (Because sometimes the honey wagon hits you.)

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    long beach, ca, usa
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    I came across a boat for sale and rejected out of hand because a previous owner had "glassed" a carvel planked hull. Even though the owner said the boat was bone dry. From comments I read here I probably saved myself from a lot of grief. Jay Greer's comment about the different coefficients of elasticity between wood and epoxy stands out. I can just see micro cracks forming after a few rough sails. Maybe that would lead to localized wood rot, I don't know.
    Seems this could be really bad if the hull actually needed frames sistered with planks replaced and the epoxy was just an attempt to address that.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norwalk CT
    Posts
    1,035

    Default Re: To Glass or Not to Glass, The Adirondack Guideboat

    Gawd thats pretty....nice, nice boat

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