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Thread: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

  1. #1
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    Default Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    I am looking to connect with anyone who has rowed (or built) a Gartside #179 (17' Coastal Rowboat). I have been staring at the lines plan (on my wall, immediately behind my computer monitor) for a year now and am still uncertain I want to build her. I am concerned about how she would handle if I got caught out in a 15+ knot crosswind. It seems like a crosswind would have a tendency to dump the boat. Has anyone on this forum rowed a Gartside #179 who is willing to share his or her experience?

    Side Note: For personal aesthetic reasons, I am determined to build a cedar-strip double-ender for expedition solo rowing. My preoccupation with getting caught out in unpleasant conditions comes from having rowed (and sailed) the Inside Passage in a Chesapeake Light Craft Northeaster Dory. I am looking for a boat that is faster under oars (than the dory) and am willing to forgo a sail for anything other than running with the wind. I am considering the Gartside #115 (Bob)--possibly stretched 6 to 12 inches--as an alternate to the #179.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    I have not, but I like that boat also. She has a rounded bottom profile like a shell, but lots of flare out to the 4'9" beam. I'd expect with a light load primary stability is low, but would harden up fast. Have you asked Gartside? Also curious where you will use it, back to the IP or on some Montana lakes?

    My own coastal rower is on the big side, 17' 10" with 60" beam and probably 220 lb empty. I find it fairly safe in a strong cross wind and chop, will lie beam to and just ride over, but hard to make any headway into the wind at 20+.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    Have a look at this thread: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...Gartside/page2

    In post #61 there is some information about the stability.

    It might be a particular design, but it is also particularly good looking.




  4. #4
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    Have you asked Gartside? Also curious where you will use it, back to the IP or on some Montana lakes?
    I have not contacted Mr. Gartside about this particular issue (but I certainly have pestered him with other questions). I am hoping to hear from end-users. In my dreams, I will be rowing this boat along the IP (my second IP trip was a glorious failure, so I am still hoping for another go). Realistically, this boat won't see much worse than the San Juans and Gulf Islands (I grew up out that way and make it back annually for a trip). I have a small boat for the local Montana rivers and lakes (design courtesy of Flo-Mo: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t-mini-faering).

    Quote Originally Posted by flo-mo View Post
    Have a look at this thread: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...Gartside/page2

    In post #61 there is some information about the stability.

    It might be a particular design, but it is also particularly good looking.
    Thanks Flo-Mo! I did see that post about the launch day performance. I considered trying to bump that thread, but decided to start a new one.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    For an alternate you might take a look at Clint Chase's Drake. There are people that have had them out in the gnarlies. My experience with these boats when the wind is up is that the less windage the better. My dory is hard to handle cross wind in a real breeze when the seas are cappimg. She'll heel to the puffs. Loaded down she's better or in a big old swell. My ducker just sneaks along under the wind.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    Hi,

    Flo-Mo´s Fast Rowboat is in my opinion a very interesting "Coastal Rowing" Boat. Two Sheets of Plywood are still waiting to be "folded" in my shop..... .

    best wishes

    Christian

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    If you want something both faster and less affected by crosswinds, you might consider Colin Angus's Rowcruiser: https://angusrowboats.com/pages/rowcruiser. I've had a close look at one, although I've not rowed it, but was quite impressed. Minimal in terms of accommodation, but it looked fast.

    He also has a version with a sail rig, versions of which have completed the R2AK.

    I realize on re-reading your original post this design doesn't meet your aesthetic goals, but how fixed are those?
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    Between the Flashboat, Bob and the Coastal rowboat, as I understand it...

    The Flashboat came about after studying a 'real' flashboat's lines and ergonomics in Cornwall. These were the racing developments of the working Falmouth Punts (which became the Whitehalls in the new world). They are maximised to a set length and outriggers are banned, so we see the flare out the the inter rollock beam necessary. The tortured ply gets the weight lowest. The strip version is a bit heavier. Bob is the double ended version to improve it's manners in following seas and beach landing, in strip plank which seems to yeald a slightly heavier boat also it has to be said. It can't be pushed so easily without a transom in following waves. The coastal rowboat reduces waterline beam further, for potentially even higher performance. The boat will initially feel 'tippier' but potentially faster if your comfortable with it and get sat down low. The helm weight will mean it tips then gains stability and stops. This is the key with these boats...how much waterline beam your prepared to challenge yourself to and is the measurement you need to know before hand. A newcomer might be happy and more comfortable/ confident in a Bob. In the coastal rowing boats case, the narrower waterline requires a reverse curve flare out to the rollock spacing - normally about 5'2" for a standard male. Will it catch wind? Well right down at that level the wind sheer effect does reduce the wind present to about half. Also something very light and narrow is always going to be affected by wind more, though it should be managed by an able rower with a shift in weight or rudder/ skeg. To avoid it you will have to build a boat narrower at the gunwale and pay for a rigger. A narrower boat should be less affected by pitch and roll in waves, until something does put you offline, then it won't have as much stability. If you've never fixed seat rowed, the Bob design is probably more forgiving as its a bit wider on the waterline: it has a more stable beam to depth ratio, but it will be slightly slower than the coastal row boat. I have measured the waterline beams - they do differ, but can't find where I've put that. If you've rowed plenty, and it sounds like you have go straight to the coastal rower. The ply Drake Race boat is notable for being properly designed for higher froude speeds for flat out racing, with a higher prismatic coefficient than normal. If you are moving at racing speeds, then this one is well worth a look at, as it's correctly designed for high speed efficiency, but it will be technically slightly less efficient travelling at low speeds I guess in theory, though it probably won't be noticeable. The gunwale beam is lower though and some of the ones online have outriggers fitted to get oar lock spacing, which are costly relative to the cost of the boat. That's a decision for an individual to accept or avoid. There has never been so many good fixed seat rowers available. If your happy to pay for outriggers etc, then that's another kettle of fish.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 01-07-2019 at 07:09 AM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    Folding outriggers have never been cheap relative to the cost of the boat. As I recall, a Rushton pulling boat was about 100 dollars or less when the folding outriggers were 5. Say if that boat was 5000 now, the folding outriggers would be 250.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Anyone rowed a Gartside #179 (Coastal Rowboat)?

    I would love the chance to row all these boats and see how the differences turn out to affect speed in actual use. IMO sea state changes things a lot, the boats which are narrow at the waterline for flat water speed lose this advantage in waves. In local mixed races with categories for skinny plastic shells and classic wooden skiffs, the shells are far quicker on flat water but bog down to the same speed in waves. My own big skiff with a significantly wide beam and flat sole actually does well in a following sea, it can slide down the wave fronts and pick up speed by surfing. The shells do not do this, they dig in.

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