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Thread: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

  1. #1
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    Default Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    -Dave

  2. #2
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    No brains.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    So he's a coconut?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    applied masochism .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    I think it's great. I hope he produces an interesting book.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    Or at least a rhyme: Rub-a-dub-dub, one man in a tub.
    -Dave

  7. #7
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    I'm all for adventure and risk taking. Up to a point. Some adventures I think the rescue costs should be paid up front. If he has no EPIRB, all power to him, hope the wine is most excellent.

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    I hope he enjoys smacking his head against 6000 years of craft evolution.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    Hope he has a lot to read.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    According to some the Chinese, some thousands of years ago, used the currents and winds to do most of the work to get to America………….

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    Thinking of gavin Menzies? We did some study on a 1421 expedition by an Admiral Huang He (I think) who was sent out on a global exploratory expedition with several fleets. Fun book, if Menzies' delivery was a bit stilted.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    How many months will this guy spend in a sauna? It's winter now, but that thing will warm up something fierce by the time he drifts into the tropics.
    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    According to some the Chinese, some thousands of years ago, used the currents and winds to do most of the work to get to America………….
    Winds? As in sails? All early explorers used winds and some got lucky with currents.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  13. #13

    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    Thanks for posting! I googled the guys name and it looks like he's just wanting to demonstrate how ocean currents work solely as a means of getting from one place to another. He's also dropping markers for some other people doing scientific research on currents in the Atlantic. It's still no Kon-Tiki expedition but its interesting. I wonder if he chose the dates to launch because they were closer to Winter Solstice?

  14. #14
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    That is a seasickness machine, if ever there was one.

    That said, I say, "fair winds!"

    Kevin


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    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    My guess is that his little boat will roll so much
    that his brain will not be able to make any useful decisions.
    UGH!

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    And I hope he has a seatbelt.
    -Dave

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    I'd want a ladder back up so if I rolled off lolling about on top I'd have a way back.

    I'd also want a dorade box with a tall funnel for those stormy days when all is battened down.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    J've done that route 6 times always with sail or motor. I'd say his journey is perfectly feasible. Steve Callaghan did most of it in a liferaft.

    I'm surprised he did not leave from Cape Verde, he'd have already been in the trades.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    He might gain great publicity as well by going over Niagra Falls in that barrel!

    Forty plus years ago there was a pair of Nimrods who envisioned traveling to distant tropic isles in a vessel made of an up ended gas station fuel tank. This pair of Nut Balls constructed a false bow and a square rig plus a poop deck on the outlandish contrivance! It had three decks connected by water tight hatches and the Thingy drew about twenty five feet from the water line down The bottom/bilge space contained sand and gravel for ballast.

    A great party was held at Hans Dickman's boat yard next to the Cannery on the Rhine in Newport Harbor CA. The would be voyagers were dressed as pirates and one had a live parrot on his shoulder. Yo Ho Ho music blasted over a P. A. system and every one got gloriously drunk!

    The contrivance was launched by a crane and later the "H.M.S Nutball" was towed out to sea. It proved to be so unstable with the sand ballest that a heavy ball was attached to it with a long chain, making the thingy into a drifting bell bouy with no bell aboard! Again they were towed out to sea. This time they were towed past Catalina Island before being set adrift. Drift they did, right into a Chubasco off of the coast of Baja CA. The storm raged and they were driven ashore, some where below Ensenada.
    The ball and chain saved them from being tossed on the rocks and they abandoned ship by swimming ashore.

    However, they were still not done with their quest of Notoriety by Nautical Insanity! During the storm they noted that fish, that could be seen though an underwater viewing port, were swimming at ease beneath the storm waves in relatively calm water. So, they returned to Costa Mesa and proceeded to start building another boat from a larger tank. This tank was to be turned into a submarine! This one was located in the driveway in front of the Alta Dena Dairy just off of 17th St. in Costa Mesa CA.

    It had a conning tower and a superstructure made of galvanized sheet iron roofing panels. This hare brained project sat for many years in front of the Dairy store and never went to sea! It was a source of speculation and humor for many years. We never heard what happended to that pair of nut balls!
    Jay

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Transatlantic -- no sail, no motor, no problem

    Good grief! With a windmill sail no less.

    Image source: https://outlet.historicimages.com/products/aci463 there is one left, so if you are looking at this thread a year from now, the image might be gone. Not to worry, a lower resolution image and a newspaper story is here: https://newspaperarchive.com/anderso...c-10-1972-p-4/ The newspaper turned the storage tank into a disabled lifeboat, but when did a newspaper ever get the details straight?
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  21. #21
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    That's nice of a newspaper, to take an old storage tank and turn it into a lifeboat for disabled folk.

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