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Thread: Most powerful solar array

  1. #1
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    Default Most powerful solar array

    on Mars!


    https://www.space.com/42607-insight-...er-record.html

    During its full first day on the Red Planet, the solar-powered lander generated more electrical power in one day than any previous Mars vehicle has, mission team members said.
    .
    .
    The 4,588 watt-hours InSight generated on its first sol, or Martian day, from solar power is well over the 2,806 watt-hours generated in a day by NASA's Curiosity rover, which runs on a nuclear system called a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. Coming in third was the solar-powered Phoenix lander, which generated around 1,800 watt-hours in a day, according to NASA officials.

    After sending back its first photo of the landing site and extending its two solar arrays, each of which is about 7 feet in diameter (2.2 meters), InSight got to work photographing its environment and unlatching its robotic arm, which it will eventually use to deploy seismometers and a heat probe to learn about Mars' interior.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Most powerful solar array

    Early panorama here.

    Dry and sunny!

    Andy
    "We were schooner-rigged and rakish, with a long and lissome hull ..."

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Most powerful solar array

    More about those solar panels.

    They convert 29.5% of the light energy into electricity.

    https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2018/12/...cy-solar-cell/

    Datasheet: https://solaerotech.com/wp-content/u...d-2018-v.1.pdf
    Will

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Most powerful solar array

    Thanks, guys.
    More info & photos HERE


    A partial view of the deck of NASA's InSight lander, where it stands on the Martian plains Elysium Planitia. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8).
    Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Most powerful solar array

    Looks like the cameras are 1024 by 1024 pixels. I’m not a camera guy; how does that translate to something like a new cell phone? I would think they would want ultra high def. But maybe radiation and longevity come into play.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Most powerful solar array


    Cameras
    The InSight lander carries two complementary engineering cameras that help with navigation and hazard avoidance. One of the cameras is mounted on the arm; the other on the front of the lander.

    Camera on Arm
    A camera on the arm is called the Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC). It is similar to the Navcam navigation cameras onboard the Opportunity and Curiosity rovers, with full color capability added. It has a 45-degree field of view, and provides a panoramic view of the terrain surrounding the landing site. This camera will image the workspace in detail to support the selection of the best spots to place down the instruments. This camera will take color images of the instruments on the lander's deck and a 3-D view of the region around the lander. Information received from the Navcam helps engineers and scientists guide the deployment of the seismometer and the heat flow probe. Scientists can point the camera in any direction, so it can take images to be combined into a 360-degree panorama of the lander's surroundings.

    Camera on Lander Body
    The lander's other camera, the Instrument Context Camera (ICC), is mounted just below the deck, on the edge of the lander facing the workspace, which is the area of ground within reach of the arm. The ICC has a "fisheye" field of view of 120 degrees. It will provide wide-angle views of the entire workspace.

    Like the Navcam, it is based on a similar camera on Opportunity and Curiosity. It is mounted under the edge of the lander's deck and provides a complementary view of the instrument deployment area.

    Both cameras have a square charge-coupled device (CCD) detector 1,024 pixels by 1,024 pixels.

    Tech Specs
    Number of Cameras 2 color cameras (one is a "fisheye")
    Main Function To help the lander find the best location for its instruments within the landing site
    Location One just below the rover deck, the other one at the end of the robotic arm.
    Image Size 1,024 pixels by 1,024 pixels

    (CONT'D AT LINK)
    InSight Lander (LINK)

    InSight Lander 'Hears' Martian Winds (JPL LINK)






    #include [ std-disclaimer ]

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Most powerful solar array

    The cameras are 'good enough' with regards to placing the primary instruments on the surface. The lander is static, the landing chosen to be boringly flat, so higher quality imagery absolutely isn't the driver. That said, by moving the camera head small angles, it's quite possible to generate higher res imagery by interpolating partial overlapping pixels and processing the results.

    What I wish was on this lander was a microphone. There's one flying on the 2020 rover (along with a helicopter!) but we've never heard the sounds of Mars since the first landing 47 years ago.

    Andy
    "We were schooner-rigged and rakish, with a long and lissome hull ..."

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Most powerful solar array

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyG

    {SNIP}

    What I wish was on this lander was a microphone. There's one flying on the 2020 rover (along with a helicopter!) but we've never heard the sounds of Mars since the first landing 47 years ago.

    Andy
    Read the second article.
    "Capturing this audio was an unplanned treat," said Bruce Banerdt, InSight principal investigator at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. "But one of the things our mission is dedicated to is measuring motion on Mars, and naturally that includes motion caused by sound waves."

    Teleconference audio and accompanying visuals will stream live on NASA's website. A follow-along page is available at:

    InSight Mars Wind (LINK).

    Two very sensitive sensors on the spacecraft detected these wind vibrations: an air pressure sensor inside the lander and a seismometer sitting on the lander's deck, awaiting deployment by InSight's robotic arm. The two instruments recorded the wind noise in different ways. The air pressure sensor, part of the Auxiliary Payload Sensor Subsystem (APSS), which will collect meteorological data, recorded these air vibrations directly. The seismometer recorded lander vibrations caused by the wind moving over the spacecraft's solar panels, which are each 7 feet (2.2 meters) in diameter and stick out from the sides of the lander like a giant pair of ears.

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

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