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Thread: Fixing up a Folkboat

  1. #1
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    Default Fixing up a Folkboat

    A couple of years ago I bought a 1961 English Folkboat. When I first saw the boat it was in a fairly poor state but there was something about it that I liked so I did a deal and towed it 500 miles from the south of England to a yard near my home in Scotland.


    I fixed a few of the most pressing problems, did some painting and went sailing. The boat goes very nicely but lets in water around the forward bilges and has a couple of deck leaks.


    Itís back out of the water now and Iíve started to pull it apart in an attempt to fix some of the problems.


    Iíve been stripping paint from inside and removing blocks that had been screwed over some wide seams. The forward floors are a little loose and I think I need to find a way to improve the structure of the forward bilges rather than just packing in more cotton etcÖ


    Iíve started making some videos about the work and I would really appreciate any words of encouragement or tips about the best way to go about the work.


    Hereís a link to the latest episode.

    https://youtu.be/VUhEFts__ck


    All the bestÖ.. Steve


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Hi, and welcome to the forum.

    Those leaks are caused by mast compression pushing the keel down and the shroud loads pulling the garboards up.
    Are the floors under the mast step degraded as well as being loose? They obviously need to be refastened.
    Get rid of the compression/ tension forces pulling apart and reef out all of the seams in that area. Then may be put a spanish windlass round her to see if the seams close up.

    Consider laminating in a couple of heavy ring frames to feed the shroud loads straight down to the mast step. A pair of tie rods would do it, but will intrude into the accommodation access forward of the mast.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Exactly as Nick says - the mast compression and shroud tension is overcoming the structure and the garboard seam are opening.

    Unstep the mast and clean up the whole area internally – which you have done. The garboard seams are a bit open but they don't look really horrible - they probably leak when you are beating to windward, specially in a heavy sea.

    Rake out the caulking from the garboard seam and probably a couple of seams above (to the tops of the floors), for the whole length where the seams are open and a bit beyond.

    Remove the floors in the affected area and check if they are sound. They will probably have bolts up through the wood keel and copper clenches through the planking. So you have to drive the clenches out and lift the floors off the bolts – as they are already loose this may not be too bad a job.

    Though it would be nice to close up the garboard seams and you can try with a spanish windlass around the hull as Nick suggests, this may not be possible.

    The main thing to do now is to refit or renew the floors, which are the structural elements that are linking the centreline structure to the planking so the loads can be transferred into the hull structure generally. If the bolts through the wood keel are good, they can be re-used, but if they are corroded then alternative fastenings will have to be arranged and you probably can't fit new bolts because of the exterior centreline structure. So you will have to rely on heavy coachscrew type fastenings down into the wood keel, which are not as effective as through bolts. Because of this it would be worth considering fitting some additional floors intermediate to the existing ones.

    Also check the plank to frame fastenings in the whole area and harden up the clenches if necessary - though the whole area does look pretty good in the video.

    Once the structure in the area is sound and the fastening are all good and tight, the garboard and the other seams can be re-caulked. Oakum would be preferable to cotton if you can get it. If the garboard seam is still open, it can be caulked OK with care provided there is still a seam bevel - that is the seam is wider on the outside than the inside – so the caulking can be driven in tight without spilling through on the inside. Bunch the caulking closely as you make it into the seam, so there is plenty there. As long as the structure and fastenings are sound it's not likely that you will over-caulk her.

    There are two other solutions to an open seam - seam battens on the inside, which are not generally very successful; and fitting a spline in the seam, which is successful, but is quite a tricky job to get done right.

    The black jeffries could simply be pitch – it is not unusual to run pitch in areas like this to ensure a good water flow in the bilge. In any case putting stuff on the inside isn't going to fix any problems, so apart from ensuring a clear run of water, there's no point in it. If the caulking does show on the inside, give the area several good coats of paint.

    Again, as Nick suggests, you could beef up the structure in the area with a couple of laminated ring frames, which would help contain the compression/tension couple. This should be in addition to the work described above, not in place of it.

    Welcome to the forum!!

    Cheers -- George
    To be truly free to live, one must be free to think and speak.

    A C Grayling

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    What Nick and George said. I had a similar issue on my Nordic if the rigging was too tight, or prolonged bashing upwind, actually a common problem. Over caulking and attempts to inject polyurethane between the planks usually makes things worse down the line, so offer only temporary relief.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Enjoyed your video. Please keep on making them when you can.

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat





    Thanks for getting back to me. I’ve been working on the boat today…. lots more scraping of paint and extreme discomfort. There’s possibly a limit to the amount of time a full sized and slightly worn out human can spend in the forepeak of a small boat… I feel I may have exceeded that today….


    I’ve taken the mast step out. The coach screws holding it in place were extremely corroded ( they all snapped off, leaving stubs of rusty steel in the knee). Directly under the mast step is a keelboat which goes through the after-end of the knee, on through the timber keel and into the ballast. It’s clearly absolutely rotten. That said… the area around the mast step seems to give an impression of being fairly sound, the wide seam problems are further forward. The most forward two floors are not connected to the stem at all, they are only riveted to the planking. Also I’ve continued digging out the tarry stuff. The rabbet in the stem seems to be bigger than I would have expected. The tar stuff seems to be a kind of semi-structural filler… I wonder if it was put in because things were getting bit loose… a previous person working on the boat may have gone down the route of filling gaps rather than trying to properly close them. Maybe this was the correct course to take. Sometimes it's better to work with what you have rather than trying to torture a structure into being what you want it to be.


    I’m getting a little bit of a sinking feeling about all of this but I’ve started now…….. I think you’re right that I have to reef out all the wide seems, remove the forward floors and generally remove all the stuff that’s been bunged into the gaps. I may need to pry out the nails holding the forward ends of the planking to the stem… Then I can see if I can pull things together. I may try using some ratchet-straps for this.


    Thanks again… I’ll put another Youtube video up when things have progressed a bit further.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Traditional boatbuilding is hard work!! It's hard on the knees and hard on the back. Boatbuilders worked at it 5Ĺ days a week 48 to 50 weeks a year ...

    If one keel bolt is suspect it's likely the rest are and you will have to deal with that. Though sometimes keel bolts get renewed where they can be got at and the more inaccessible ones (under the engine, mast step etc) get left. But whatever you need to find that out Ė the only realistic way is to drive a couple of them out. At one time you could get the bolts x-rayed in situ but I don't think that's an option any more.

    The mast step doesn't need a lot of fastening, not like the floors do. As long as it is secured from moving it will be fine, which is likely why it was fastened with coach screws in the first place. It's the floors that do most of the work.

    I wouldn't pull the hood end and garboard plank fastenings into the stem and/or keel unless you really have to, or unless you are reasonably convinced they are no longer doing their job. From what it is possible to see on your video, the planking basically looked in pretty good shape. And the garboard seam internally didn't look that bad either.

    Don't quite understand what you mean by
    The rabbet in the stem seems to be bigger than I would have expected
    Ė do you mean that the planking appears not to be fastened hard down into it? Or that externally the seam between the garboard/hood ends is wider than you would expect?

    It was quite normal on a new build to run pitch all the way down the sides of the stem up forward to ensure that pockets of water didn't get trapped behind the frames and so on. There is no structural purpose served by this however and the idea that it might stop the hull working and leaking is fanciful.

    You may not be able to pull things together - that doesn't mean that you can't refasten and re-caulk with things as they are. Obviously it's desirable to get everything back to near original, but it's not essential as long as you can fasten everything together OK.

    What is essential is that the caulking is raked out of the seams in the planking in the area before you try to refasten anything. It's a waste of time otherwise.

    The video is nice but some photos would be helpful also.

    Cheers -- George
    To be truly free to live, one must be free to think and speak.

    A C Grayling

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Hello again... I've done a bit more work on the Folkboat and posted another video on Youtube. Paint scraping, seam raking and keel bolt bashing. Also I've given a description of how the boat is built. Hopefully this will give you a clearer idea of the issues that need to be looked at.

    What I meant in a previous post about the planking in the rabbet is that the planks seem to be a good fit when viewed from outside but when seen from inside there seems to be a gap between the inner face of the planking and the outer face of the rabbet. I've carefully removed the pitch from these joints (it was in generally poor shape and was sucking water into the joins by capillary action). I wondered if this would enable the planks to be fastened down harder onto the backbone but they all feel fairly sound.

    The gaps in the lower planks around the forefoot are quite wide. I think that the forestay has probably deformed the front end of the hull and pulled the planking away from the backbone. The first two floors are loose and were never bolted to the stem. I think replacing these and adding bolts may be worth while, although drilling new holes through the forefoot may weaken it a bit?
    I expect that closing the gaps by pulling them together will be difficult so the question is, how to get them to be caulkable. I think I may try routing them out so they have nice flat and parallel sides then gluing in a spline to one plank and cotton caulking the remaining smaller seam. I guess I could redo the blocks that I removed with better fitting and better fixed replacements but this doesn't feel like the right way forward.

    All the planking etc... is very wet... too wet for epoxy I think... any thoughts on using PU glue for this? And what size and shape caulking seam should I end up with? Should the planks be tight on the inside and V shaped towards the outside or maybe they should have a step in them. Any thoughts?


    https://youtu.be/mCZPE5M8ty0

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    You should not have been able to simply pull that bolt out by hand. It should be a driving fit like the others. Surely she is not on concrete or tarmac, can you not dig a hole to drive that bolt out?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    That's an interesting comment. As I said on the film, the previous owner told me that two of the bolts had been replaced about twenty years ago but couldn't remember which ones. The one that came out easily was definitely a replacement as it had a nut on both ends rather than a welded on head at the bottom.

    I'll get the bolts and holes cleaned up. Then I'll measure them with a calliper. I guess I need to find out if the replacement bolts are thinner than the originals or if the holes have been opened up during replacement.

    The one that lifted upwards was covered in a sticky grease type goo. The others are coated in a heavy oily tar.

    What would you say is the consequences of the bolts not being a very tight fit?

    About getting the other ones driven down. I asked the yard owner if I could dig a hole but he said no. The yard has a concrete floor. I think it was previously a factory floor. I'll ask him again or try to figure out how much higher I need to lift the boat. It would be a shame to cut a bolt in half only to find out there was nothing wrong with it.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Hi Paul, excellent video and summary of the structure of a wood boat. You are right about keelbolts and how important they are in the structure. I put off replacing the ones on an old Nordic Folkboat for years. How do you know if they are good or bad?

    What we found is that once the keel to keel timber seal opens up the structure degrades in a couple ways. The first and most obvious is the keelboats rust and corrode. The thing I didn't know about is that the oak floors can develop iron sickness. It is as if they turn to charcoal. On my boat, the first keelboat was changed but the floor wasn't and when I unbolted the iron mast step, the floor holding it just crumbled.

    I was very fortunate to have a friend who knew how to change Folkboat keelboats. My boat, Shanty US #56, was one of the very old ones, built in 1949 so she had a keel where the bolts went straight through the iron keel, rather that to pockets higher up like on newer Folkboats. I was surprised how fast we were able to replace the keelbolts and more important it was a total success, the boat has been raced extensively ever since and doesn't leak. Here is how he did it, hope it helps.

    http://www.sfbayfolkboats.org/archiv...keelbolts.html

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Thanks for this... interesting to read your comment about iron sickness. When I knocked out keel bolt 3 the floor cracked and a chunk fell out of the bottom. Very much, as you say, like charcoal. I didn't put it on the video because I was a bit dispirited about it but it will definitely need to be replaced.

    I'm not planning to drop the keel off altogether as shown in the link you sent even though it would be great to re apply the seal between the ballast and timber keel.

    I'd love to take keelboat 6 out. Its the one closest to the lowest part of the bilge and is under the engine so will probably never have been checked. But in the real world, it'll have to wait until next winter. I think that if I know that 5 out of the 7 bolts are good then I'll feel reasonably confident that the boat isn't going to fall apart.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Steve, I think you should pull the garboards and maybe two or three more planks off on each side. It will allow you to examine the backbone and determine what problems exist and how to approach the repair. There are some issues along the garboard towards the stern that can be addressed as well. Installing new planking will allow you to close up the seams properly reducing the likelihood of a failure in the future.

    The fact that the floor bolts are loose makes me believe the backbone members in that area are soft and probably require repair

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Yes, cutting the iron keel is a pretty radical approach, but it really worked well and was fast and gentle to the structure. We drove out the forward two keelboats, they were short, and had been replaced before. The remaining bolts went all the way through the iron keel. Most the corrosion on the bolts was centered right where the iron keel and keel timber meet. The bottom of the floors were blown up from the rust expanding so it would have been difficult to drive the bolts through. The keel timber would have suffered too, The cutting the iron keel off approach worked because the keelboats were in much worse shape than yours.

    I found it interesting that this boat had two piece oak floors. The bottom was a separate piece that went about as high as the garboards. The upper part was made of grown oak so the grain followed the curve of the hull. It was as if the builder knew the bottom sections would be destroyed when the keelbolts rusted and made them sacrificial. We didn't have to even disturb the top part of the floors and the bottom pieces were easy to remove.

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Hi, I have a Nordic Folkboat too and I'll be doing some more restoration work on it fairly soon. It's built quite differently to yours and with quite different materials so I don't see much relevance to you in what I'll be doing. My problem is essentially corroding copper plank fastenings. But I'd like to encourage you in what you're doing, they're classic, beautiful and wonderful little boats that are well worth the considerable effort it takes to keep these old ones going. Good luck!

    Rick

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Steve, I think you should pull the garboards and maybe two or three more planks off on each side. It will allow you to examine the backbone and determine what problems exist and how to approach the repair. There are some issues along the garboard towards the stern that can be addressed as well. Installing new planking will allow you to close up the seams properly reducing the likelihood of a failure in the future.

    The fact that the floor bolts are loose makes me believe the backbone members in that area are soft and probably require repair

    Hi Navydog

    I think that replacing the bottom few planks could well be a good idea... There is a good argument to say that having come this far with the work that it seems like a good opportunity to investigate further and do a really solid repair job. I think that there is a very good chance that some of the centreline timbers have lost some of their capacity to hold a fixing. It would be a fascinating project to replace these. But... on the other hand... There would be a really big danger that the project would grow to a scale that I can't achieve within the time available. As I mentioned in one of my previous videos, just about every boatyard you could ever visit will have a bunch of decaying projects where time and money have run out.

    I've posted another video in which I've put a shelter over the boat which I hope will enable it to dry out enough that I can do some meaningful fixes to a couple of deck leaks, glue some splines into the big open seams and get some paint onto the interior with a chance of getting it to stick. I'm wondering also if it would be a good idea to soak the timber keel etc... in raw linseed and if it would be a good idea to re apply the red lead primer in the bilges.

    I removed the forward two floors which were loose and a bit rotten. When I looked back at the video I noticed that the hull flexed quite a lot as I pulled out the nails. Hopefully the new floors will firm it all up again.

    Thanks also to all other woodenboatist who have offered advice and encouragement.


    Here's a link to the most recent video...

    https://youtu.be/IgbzBuvV_5w

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Steve,


    I understand your delema. I suggest at least pulling the garboard so you can examine the frame ends and fasteners. You want the hull connection to the keel to be as strong as possible. Depending on the garboard planks and floors alone could turn out be an error.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    I've done more work on the Folkboat and... as expected, have made some horrible discoveries. In particular that the bronze screws holding on the garboard are almost certainly all rotten. A massive part of me wants to take the lower planking off but if I find problems with the centreline timbers am I really going to refit the planking on without fixing that too? This is just too big a job for this winter... so for this year I'm going to put my faith in the copper rivets holding the garboard to the ribs and add a bunch of new screws to the lower edge.

    I've posted another video of the work... as well as digging up trouble I've been making new floor timbers and various keel bolts. The old floors at the forward end weren't bolted down. I've been in touch with a couple of other Folkboaters who told me that the floors on their boats were bolted through. Drilling new holes through the bottom of a boat feels pretty weird!

    https://youtu.be/LBkwH92iuXA

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Its only weird if you don't put anything in the holes.I suspect those rotten screws may have been brass rather than bronze.Were they pinkish?

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    They were a bit pink. I'm certain that the bottom three planks have been off at some time. The roves holding the bottom planks to the ribs are bigger than all the others but maybe they were re-fixed to the keel with sub standard screws. The big floor I took out had square nail holes beside the remains of the screws so I guess that the original planks are nailed rather than screwed anyway.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Quote Originally Posted by roundandsquare View Post
    I've done more work on the Folkboat and... as expected, have made some horrible discoveries. In particular that the bronze screws holding on the garboard are almost certainly all rotten. A massive part of me wants to take the lower planking off but if I find problems with the centreline timbers am I really going to refit the planking on without fixing that too? This is just too big a job for this winter... so for this year I'm going to put my faith in the copper rivets holding the garboard to the ribs and add a bunch of new screws to the lower edge.

    I've posted another video of the work... as well as digging up trouble I've been making new floor timbers and various keel bolts. The old floors at the forward end weren't bolted down. I've been in touch with a couple of other Folkboaters who told me that the floors on their boats were bolted through. Drilling new holes through the bottom of a boat feels pretty weird!

    https://youtu.be/LBkwH92iuXA
    The keel bolts run through the floors into the ballast so the floors are held in primarily by those bolts. The wings of the floors are normally held by screws running through the planking into the floors. I've seen Stellas built differently to that but not Folkboats.

    Rick

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    If you need a grown floor, send me a cardboard template..pm me.

    I would scrape her hull as far as necessary and get some rot killer onto her plank seams once the wood has dried out a bit later in the year. Don't trap moisture into her, then re-caulk as was original, pretty traditionally by the looks of her. Don't over caulk.

    Do as many keel bolts as you can, peace of mind is a wonderful thing. If galve off the shelf they cannot be cut, but fab shops can make welded head and tapped bolts to order, then hot galve them. Bronze rod tapped at either end is another way and is comparable in price if you take fabbing, blasting and galving of high carbon steel into the equation. Best practice is like for like.

    She will be a cracker when you're done with the drudgery. Some people take decades on them, but they are worth it. Keep a small part of your mind on the wind and spray. She is glad you found her, that's for sure.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Just watched the video ... Your boat is quite different to a classic Nordic Folkboat. It has a long cabin and a carvel hull. It looks like you're doing a great job! I can't understand why you're having trouble with the bronze fittings, unless as John suggests, they're brass. I wondered if the screws through the planking might have broken if the planking's been working, through fatigue, but that wouldn't explain that wasted nut.

    I'm not sure if you have worked out a way of sealing the chainplates through the deck but I can tell you how i did it, and it's worked very well.
    1. Sand a little bevel right around the upper edge of the hole in the deck.
    2. Make up a little plate from Tufnol (or similar) and cut a slot in it so that it fits quite neatly over the chainplate. Sand a little bevel right around the lower face of the slot.
    3. Fit the plate over the chainplate with Sikaflex (or similar) as a sealant. The sealant will form an o-ring where you've sanded the bevels.
    4. Fasten the plate to the deck. Use a West-style system so that the screws do not allow water to penetrate your deck sheathing (I don't know what sheathing you intend to put on the deck but I'd strongly recommend sheathing with glass).

    Rick

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    De zincified brass does go pink.I would be surprised if they were from the original build,is it possible that the garboards might have been replaced?Not that it matters too much if you fought them out.I don't doubt that you will replace them with something better.

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    I've been getting on with Folkboat work and put another video on Youtube... I've decided to put a bunch of new screws into the garboard... It would probably have been best to take it off but that would mean no sailing this year. I've also started replacing keel bolts and fitting new bolts to fix the new, forward floors to the forefoot. I'm a woodworker in my day job but most of the processes on the boat are new to me so as before your comments and advice would be really welcome.

    The next big task will be fitting splines to the seams in the forward part of the boat. The new floors and bolts have closed them up to some extent but some are still far too wide to caulk and have edges which are very rough, presumably from previous attempts to fix them.

    I'm planning to use a router to open up the seams to wider but cleaner openings. Then I'm thinking that I'll glue in splines. I have a couple of sapele boards to get these from. So... the question I have is... should I glue the splines to both boards or only to one?

    https://youtu.be/VOuisodLvuY

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Good to see so much progress, great video Steve.

    You seem to know what you're up to, just keep at it!

    Get some red lead in yer sarnies... A proper breakfast.

    Cheers,

    Martin.

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Quote Originally Posted by roundandsquare View Post
    I've been getting on with Folkboat work and put another video on Youtube... I've decided to put a bunch of new screws into the garboard... It would probably have been best to take it off but that would mean no sailing this year. I've also started replacing keel bolts and fitting new bolts to fix the new, forward floors to the forefoot. I'm a woodworker in my day job but most of the processes on the boat are new to me so as before your comments and advice would be really welcome.

    The next big task will be fitting splines to the seams in the forward part of the boat. The new floors and bolts have closed them up to some extent but some are still far too wide to caulk and have edges which are very rough, presumably from previous attempts to fix them.

    I'm planning to use a router to open up the seams to wider but cleaner openings. Then I'm thinking that I'll glue in splines. I have a couple of sapele boards to get these from. So... the question I have is... should I glue the splines to both boards or only to one?

    https://youtu.be/VOuisodLvuY
    If you're going to persevere with carvel and not sheathe then I think it's pretty obvious that you should clean up both seam edges but only glue in one side of the spline and caulk the other.

    Rick

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Just a thought on those screws: I own a boat fastened with bronze screws that show some pink when pulled, mine also has an iron keel. I can tell brass from bronze by the hardness.

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    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    The backbone timber on my Nordic from 1947 was completely rotten on the inside from iron. Looked fine from outside and had no leaks. It was a alarming thought that a hard grounding could easily have snapped he back, 3 of the keel bolts had wasted away to around a 1/4 of the original size. Perhaps being dropped in a crane accident was a blessing in disguise......

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
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    12,382

    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Splining those seams can be a real nasty job! You may find that a small 41/2" circular hand saw might work better. Of course you will need to take care not to cut too deep and damage a rib. Incidentally, running a bronze strap down the inside of the planking might be less work than building in ring frames and will help take up some of the mast load. Bronze rod compression bar just a bit ahead of the mast that is attached to the deck beam at the fwd side of the partners and through the mast step will transfer the mast thrust to the deck and spread the load a bit. I am a fan of Jefferie's marine glue but I have been known to use bee's wax to fill in the pockets along the garboards and keel that tend to get funky.

    Jay

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Broxburn, Scotland
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Thanks for your replies…


    About splining… I’m pretty sure that I’m going to glue one side only. I think that a 6mm cutter should do the trick for cleaning up the edges. I’m not sure how tightly the splines should fit. I imagine that it will be best if they are around 5.5mm thick so they are nearly tight on the inside with some sort of caulking bevel on the outside. Any thoughts on whether the splines should have a bevel or a rebate? As for the best tool to use to cut the wider seams… I agree that a nice little circular saw may be good… but I only have a large or very large one in my toolkit so I think that a router will have to do, although it will be a bit nerve-wracking. Does anyone have recommendations for fixing a fence to the hull to run the tool against? I’m thinking of using a thin hardwood batten pinned on with copper panel pins but in some ways making holes in the hull seems like a shame. Would double sided tape work I wonder.


    About decaying metal on boats… this seems to be a very complicated. It seems that the close proximity of ferrous and non-ferrous metals along with soggy wood creates problems both for the metals and the surrounding wood. I think it’s quite interesting that of all the old fixings that I’ve taken out of the boat the best preserved have been copper nails.


    About timbers that appear to be sound on the outside but turn out to be rotten inside… Probably best not to think about that sort of thing too much although I was quite encouraged when I cut the pocket for the graving piece in the keel timber that I didn’t have to go too deep to find sounds wood to bond to.


  32. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,418

    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Use your circular saw, the size of the saw is immaterial. A saw will not cut sideways normally and will be much easier to control. Set up a batten to maintain a uniform width from the edge. Your plank thickness may not be uniform due to various reasons so don't try to go the full thickness, leave an 1/8th or so and clean it up with a slick.
    Last edited by navydog; 04-04-2019 at 05:32 PM.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toodyay, Western Australia
    Posts
    793

    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Crap internet at my place, but finally got to watch your video since I am visiting the big smoke for the weekend. You've done a good job on the filming. I was expecting to hear a Scottish accent, I guess that isn't where you're originally from. Nothing to add, but learning plenty from this interesting thread. Good luck with the splining.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    10,019

    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Quote Originally Posted by roundandsquare View Post


    About timbers that appear to be sound on the outside but turn out to be rotten inside… Probably best not to think about that sort of thing too much although I was quite encouraged when I cut the pocket for the graving piece in the keel timber that I didn’t have to go too deep to find sounds wood to bond to.

    I did think twice about posting that, but, if your backbone timbers are hollow on the inside, then its a bit like putting lipstick on a pig. Im glad yours seems fine. I would however drill a small hole that could be plugged with a dowl, only needs to be 6mm or so, but you will know for sure if the inside is solid wood or something else. For a site chippie doing a great job! (not meant as an insult)

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valnesfjord, Norway
    Posts
    961

    Default Re: Fixing up a Folkboat

    Subscribing to your youtube channel so best subscribing here too. Dreaming about a folkboat!

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