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Thread: Yankee Tender build

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Madison, WI, US
    Posts
    3

    Default Yankee Tender build

    Greetings Wooden Boat community! I'm brand new to the forum and fairly new to boat building.

    I'm building the Yankee Tender using WB plans inspired by the Asa Tompson skiff. I've found a few threads about this boat and related topics that have been helpful in getting started.

    However, I do have a quick question related to the construction of the transom. The plans reference splining and gluing the transom per WB No. 26, but I don't have access right now to this article. From other threads it seems the spline is for two purposes: it helps align the boards during the glue up and it acts like a stopwater. A few posts have said that using a waterproof glue such as titebond III would eliminate the need for splines because the glue lines between the three planks sit above the water line. Is there another reason for splining the boards that make up the transom? Would edgegluing with titebond III be sufficient for the transom?

    I'm planning to use douglas fir for the bottom, cedar for the rest of the planks, and mahogany for the transom.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    1,916

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    Splining will keep the transom boards aligned and watertight through the many moisture cycles of the boat's life. It is a much more robust construction. I would use cedar splines, snug fitting, and glue the transom up with epoxy.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,912

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    Putting splines in also increases the gluing area, which will improve the strength of the joint.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    651

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    If you are gluing long grain to long grain in the same orientation ( parallel, not perpendicular) the joint will be as strong as the wood, as long as the joint is properly prepared and constructed. Splining will not add to the strength and using differing species for the spline may cause telegraphing. If the adhesive used is subject to deterioration then a spline may be useful as a mechanical backup.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Hoffman Estates IL
    Posts
    2,380

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    I splined. Probably thirty years ago. The thought at the time was that by the time I got the boat done, there would be a lot of stuff that needed to be removed if I ever had to repair the transom, rails, planks, knees.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,146

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    Given what I have seen over the years I would spline with the same wood as the transom, and cut the spline with the grain running at an angle.
    just my .002

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    vancouver, british columbia
    Posts
    1,116

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    Welcome to the Forum.

    A stopwater is a different animal than a spline. You don't want your splines to get wet.
    Since I splined a similar 7/8" mahogany transom I'll venture a description of the process. I used epoxy. Can't vouch for any other stuff but others may.
    Lay out your planks in a blank to fit the pattern. I used 4" planks (by 7/8"). The splines ended up being about 1/4" by about 1". Cut the rabbet dead centre by first aligning the plank about 1/8" off centre on the tablesaw, make the cut, reverse the plank and cut again. You're left with a cut perfectly centred. Remove the bit in the centre and clean up with a chisel.
    Now cut the spline and plane it to fit so it moves freely in the channel.
    Paint all surfaces with clear epoxy then thicken up the remainder with cabosil and paste the channel with it.
    Clamp to dry. Cut on the bandsaw.

    SPLINES.jpg

    This is the only pic I can put my hands on at the moment, but you get the idea.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Madison, WI, US
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    All - Thanks for all the suggestions. Based on your comments I'm planning to use splines and epoxy.

    darroch - thanks for the details about the assembly process-very helpful.


    Thanks!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    98

    Default Re: Yankee Tender build

    I tend to agree with Dusty (post #4); general consensus among woodworkers I know (not necessarily boatbuilders) is that a properly "jointed" edge that is properly "wetted" with an appropriate glue is stronger than other methods- and almost always stronger than the wood itself. Also, by its very nature epoxy will leave a more visible glue line than a "wood glue" like TBIII. However, the differences may be so negligible as to be moot...
    Also, on the Yankee Tender you have the frames on the inside where the the planking meets the transom and the sternpost on the outside that mates with the skeg; these give lots of additional support to the transom.
    Have fun with the build!
    pvg

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