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Thread: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

  1. #36
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    I don’t know how I missed this but it sure looks like it’d be a great trip. We need to organize something like this here in Maine.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Charts? We need charts? I was just gonna follow the crowd....

  3. #38
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Thanks! Funny, I was actually just on Amazon, looking at charts. That's like 15 charts, at $20 each, that's going to rack up. You could buy a GPS unit for that...

  4. #39
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    This waterproof maptech chart is what you'll need for the Salish 100 ... $25 or so.

    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Or navionics . 50 bux. Cell phone /I pad.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Etdbob View Post
    Charts? We need charts? I was just gonna follow the crowd....
    My thoughts exactly! How can you miss 100 boats all going to the same place? It even gives you an incentive not to be first! I'll probably be at the back of the pack, which just means the BBQ will be ready when I pull in. I'm looking forward to seeing the list of boats. I'm already thinking about what to pack and provision.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    I like the chart book that has different size arrows for currents and tides on different pages for the same location, and you use an index to determine what page to use at a certain time and date. The annual index is "Captain Jacks" and isn't cheap but worth every penny.
    That said, following all the other boats will probably work. I've also got Mueller's great book, and while it is good for an overview of the South Sound it's too general for actual navigation.

    I'm guessing that the limitations of shore access and camping spots may be a big issue for the S-100, and am planning on sleeping aboard my CY whenever possible. Not sure what I'll do for a dinghy, possibly a cheap inflatable yak or raft ... we shall see.
    Last edited by Thorne; 01-15-2019 at 12:09 AM.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
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  8. #43
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Thorne, you’re thinking of a current atlas, which is also an extremely
    valuable tool in the Salish Sea, but more so for the San Juans.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

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  9. #44
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    100 boats is quite a crowd, the question is how many interested parties will actually show up?

    June weather 'round these parts: https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...er-in-june.php will be a consideration. "Normal" floats between 50f and 70f and not a lot of rain but a cold wet spring could easily cut the numbers significantly.

    Enough pessimism. This has the potential to be a very fun week of cruising with a lot of great stories to be told after.
    Steve

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  10. #45
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    I don’t know how I missed this but it sure looks like it’d be a great trip. We need to organize something like this here in Maine.
    The Pen Bay circumnavigation could be the equivalent, even organized as a stage event. Launch Rockland, up to Warren, Warren over to a Eggemoggin Reach destination, then back to a Fox Islands destination. Then home. Could swing down to Isle au Haut for more distance. Could do it with people finding their own spots for the night, using MITA islands, but if we wanted to have any safety a stage event would be better. I have i mind some places that could work for stages but they need to be asked... hence not publishing same. What we need is infrastructure, someone or organization to handle entries and deal with CG and insurance implications.
    Ben Fuller
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    I'm guessing that the limitations of shore access and camping spots may be a big issue for the S-100, and am planning on sleeping aboard my CY whenever possible. Not sure what I'll do for a dinghy, possibly a cheap inflatable yak or raft ... we shall see.
    I have the same concern. Planning on sleeping aboard our Kurylko Myst, but wondering about getting to shore for various activities, including of course access to restroom facilities. According to Marty's Salish 100 Update "Tent campers who wish to anchor out will be shuttled to shore, and back, by volunteers in our fleet." which is all well and good until my crew (that would be my wife) wants to get to shore now! and a shuttle volunteer is not immediately available. I plan to use a clothesline system where I can, but I understand that that will not always be possible. So . . . what does one do for a dinghy when the dinghy you are sailing is anchored out? Suggestions?

  12. #47
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    One answer to large fleets anchoring is to raft up. One largish boat with a big anchor, and a bunch of smaller boats tied up. Add some anchors as needed.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

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  13. #48
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    My 12' Passagemaker is not designed to sleep aboard, but I was thinking of trying to come up with some sort of roll-top desk tambour to lay across the thwarts that would roll up and stow out of the way during the day. Then I'd have to rig up some sort of boom tent. I don't have a topping lift or mast crutch, so this project is rapidly spinning out of control. That tent ashore is looking better and better.

    Did everyone get Marty's epic update? I spent some time last night trying to copy paste it into a post here only to realize there's apparently a 2000 character limit. Looks like there's a ton of amazing sponsors, people are being extremely generous with letting us crash on their lawns and apparently I will be gaining weight during the trip thanks to several BBQ's. Even though the t-shirts, hats, etc. are very cool, I'll probably be making a commemorative t-shirt for the event (it's a hobby/sickness). I have a vinyl cutter that I use to make stencils. Might even slap some decals on the boat.

    Like I said earlier, I can't wait to see the boat roster. I'm wondering how many CLC boats there will be. They would make a great sponsor.

    I'm also starting to think about gear and provisioning. I think I'll make a spreadsheet with approximate weights. The Everglades Challenge has a Packing Lite PDF, but it doesn't seem very applicable to the S-100.

    Because I'm at under 12' water line with a slower theoretical hull speed, I've thought about bringing a battery and trolling motor, just in case. That's a lot of weight and room. What do you folks think about that?

    Because of the amount of gear that I'll have to carry, it looks like I'll need to install a hatch near the bow to turn my buoyancy tank into storage for light stuff. Wonder if my tent will fit through a 6" deck plate...

  14. #49
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    CaptainS -

    Do you mean Update #2? I haven't had any email from him since that one on Dec 9.


    Jim M -

    I'm looking at one of the cheap inflatable 2-3 person kayaks or rafts for that "get to shore now" transport. It can either be un/re-inflated on demand, or left inflated and towed if not interfering with sailing speed too much. I'd use a battery-powered inflator pump, having had FAR too much of my life stolen by manual pumps for larger inflatable dinghies in the past... ;-)

    I'm sure rowing the raft would be miserable for long distances, but it should work for short shore runs. Paddling a kayak would be easier but they might be harder to enter & exit alongside our little boats.





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  15. #50
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Hey Thorne,

    I received Update #3 the other day. You might want to ping Marty to make sure you're on the mailing list.

    I think any of those light inflatables will be fine for towing inflated. Any drag will be worth it once you have access to shore each night. With each leg being only 10-15 miles per day, even at 3 knots VMG, you'll still only need about 5 hours to get to the next stop. Intex makes pretty decent stuff so even if you only use it once, you're probably ahead of the game, value-proposition-wise.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post



    I had an earlier model of this raft a few years ago that I used to access my moored out boat. It worked quite well for that and wasn't at all difficult to row. It wasn't a great performer, of course, but I'd not hesitate to use it for a beach dinghy on a cruise. Mine was good for about 2 and a half years of seasonal work. Even then it didn't fail all at once. It finally developed enough tiny leaks to make using it a bother.

    Jeff

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Thanks, Cap’nS! Marty was having some issues with bulk emailing.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    I'm sure rowing the raft would be miserable for long distances, but it should work for short shore runs. Paddling a kayak would be easier but they might be harder to enter & exit alongside our little boats.


    When I was a kid I had a 1970s version of this, ugly green rubber but the same plastic oars. I rowed it on nearly every fishing lake in WA state, down most of the rivers, even across Neah Bay one time. When my dad passed away we found the thing still stored in his basement, that was hard to throw out.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Anders Bjorklund View Post
    Right, isn't that the first rule of Seamanship? Follow other boats?

    "There is no safety in numbers, or in anything else." -- James Thurber
    Well gee wiz, I was gonna take a compass and my trusty battered copy of the Washington Atlas and Gazeteer along with me....
    Honestly, I don't think a fella can get lost on this trip. I mean, I don't think I'll misplace Seattle or anything...

    Captain Skully, just pack like your going backpacking, only add a few trash bags to line yer pack for waterproof-ness. Travel light!

    My boat is even smaller than yours but I know I'll fit everything just fine. I do indeed plan to tent on shore when I can, but as long as it doesn't rain cats and dogs I can sleep in my skiff just fine...Motor boat wakes notwithstanding...

    I'll need a little extra padding around that center frame is all. I made my rowing thwart removable in the first place. I'll likely leave it at home and make a little storage box to sit on when rowing anyway. Can you remove the center thwart in your boat for space to lay down? Slide in under it?

    Eh, just bring oars and sail, no need for a motor. I'll probably be in the back of the pack right along with ye! It doesn't sound like it's to far to row if need be, and sooner or later there is always some wind. My little boat ghosts along pretty good in light airs, and reefs down for the stronger stuff. - I'm surprised I haven't heard of any sea kayaks going yet.

    I do need to make a new tarp sail, I should make a new set of oars and I guess I should buy an anchor? Never had one of those things before. I think my father in law has an old mushroom anchor laying around.
    Better turn some extra thole pins to, just to be safe.

    what does one do for a dinghy when the dinghy you are sailing is anchored out? Suggestions?
    I don't really get this - If you're in a dingy, why not simply beach the thing? Towing a tiny boat behind a small beachable boat seems silly to me.

    I must confess, I have decades experience canoe tripping, white water and flat water both, but so far only two years experience with a sail/oar skiff. I kinda just operate like I'm still in a canoe, only now I don't get to see where I'm going when I paddle, and I get to use the wind for propulsion much of the time.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Etdbob View Post

    I don't really get this - If you're in a dingy, why not simply beach the thing? Towing a tiny boat behind a small beachable boat seems silly to me.
    With over a hundred boats gathering in places intended to support a few dozen at most, its likely to get a bit crowded. And Thorne's Caledonia Yawl isn't on the small end of the spectrum in this fleet.


    I think that if he puts on a real nice hat and asks for a ride he could get one when needed.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Etdbob View Post
    ... I don't really get this - If you're in a dingy, why not simply beach the thing? Towing a tiny boat behind a small beachable boat seems silly to me.
    I must confess, I have decades experience canoe tripping, white water and flat water both, but so far only two years experience with a sail/oar skiff.
    Two words: 15' tides

    Unless you can skate over knee-deep mud and levitate your boat across tidal flats, you'll want to anchor out.

    I learned about PNW tides in the Sound when singlehanding from Anacortes to Nainamo in the early 90's. Used to SF Bay Area tides, I tied my San Juan 21 up at a mooring ball and rowed my inflatable to the shore at Jones Island State Park, where I ran the long bowline under a log on the beach and up to another tree. After a lovely hike in the woods I returned to find just the stern tubes showing on the inflatable, the rest underwater. I released the line and the boat shot up into the air like a whale sounding. DOH!

    Here's the tidal flats at Blake Island park near where we'll be anchoring -


    I really like the Anchor Buddy system, but you'll need two good anchors and a fair amount of anchor line. It uses a poly-covered heavy 50' bungee to allow shore access but then will pull the boat back out to the stern anchor.
    Like this but under oars - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7D4Tu_aEQ4
    Last edited by Thorne; 01-16-2019 at 06:34 PM.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    I tried that way under oars, pretty amusing for people onshore as you are scrambling to put the oars away and the boat is heading back out again. Easier to add a line on the anchor buddy, beach the boat and step ashore, pull in on the line to stretch the anchor buddy, then tie off to the boat and let it out under control.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    That Caledonia Yawl is just big enough to consider messing with a dink, especially with 100 boats in the mix. (Is it really that many? If so, wow.) Cruising alone it's probably not really necessary. I couldn't see using one with Haverchuck. As a mulleted fool I once knew often said: to each cat his own rat.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    I tried that way under oars, pretty amusing for people onshore as you are scrambling to put the oars away and the boat is heading back out again. Easier to add a line on the anchor buddy, beach the boat and step ashore, pull in on the line to stretch the anchor buddy, then tie off to the boat and let it out under control.
    Yep, I've provided more than my share of entertainment trying to get the length of the Anchor Buddy system set correctly. Rowing like hell for shore only to be snatched back out into the cove! Trying to drop oars and hop over the bow before the boat zooms aft! Having the shore anchor pull out and the boat drift downwind on the stern anchor!



    It can be fun to surprise folks that don't know about it. With the boat pulled up on shore with everyone else's, you just lean on the bow and -- hey presto! -- the boat goes shooting backwards. ;-)

    Yes, adding a bit of line to the stern cleat where the Anchor Buddy attaches can save a lot of excitement.
    Last edited by Thorne; 01-16-2019 at 06:54 PM.
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Anchor buddy probably works best in a lunch hook situation, or on a lake or river without any tidal action. No way a guy could set up a clothesline with a large group of boats around.

    I've been in situations where a bunch of us sail into a small cove for lunch and then everyone suddenly starts milling about while waiting for someone else to be first to drop a hook, then we all row over and say "uh, do you mind if I raft alongside?" People with slow boats might get there last, but they rarely have to be the lunchtime mothership.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Anchor buddy probably works best in a lunch hook situation, or on a lake or river without any tidal action. No way a guy could set up a clothesline with a large group of boats around. ...
    Well you **can** set up either a standard rope trolley or Anchor Buddy in a crowded anchorage -- and sit back and watch as others find the lines with daggerboards, rudders and centerboards... Fun for the entire family!
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    Yep, I've provided more than my share of entertainment trying to get the length of the Anchor Buddy system set correctly. Rowing like hell for shore only to be snatched back out into the cove! Trying to drop oars and hop over the bow before the boat zooms aft! Having the shore anchor pull out and the boat drift downwind on the stern anchor!
    Been there done that. I found that running the Anchor Buddy in parallel with the first fifty feet of anchor line after the chain (tied off to alpine butterfly loops in the anchor line either end) works best for me. Lots of flexibility as to where to drop the anchor as long as I can reach shore. Jump out, pull as hard as I can to stretch the buddy to its full length and set the anchor, tie off the line to the shore with 35 or so feet of slack, and jump on the bow of the boat holding the line. Let the buddy pull me and the boat out to its max, tie in another alpine butterfly loop in the anchor line at that point, and hook my mooring float to that.

    Even so, the Anchor Buddy is not the end all solution. At max, it can only provide about 35 feet of stretch. With the bow of the boat pulled 35 feet off shore, the stern is only about 15-20 feet out. Which leads to situations like this in an onshore wind.



    Rumsey was pushed toward shore and bottoming out on the rocks - had to wade out and move the attachment farther out.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    I deal with that issue by dropping the anchor quite a ways offshore, and hooking that end of the Anchor Buddy to a ring and small fender tied to a loop in that anchor line -- said loop being capable of being retied closer to the anchor if needed. So in certain situations like the above, I can get into the boat and pull myself out further and tie to the anchor line at that point.

    Biggest problem I've had with the stretching line is in crowded anchorages, where the Anchor Buddy lets the boat wander around with wind and current.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    ....I've been in situations where a bunch of us sail into a small cove for lunch and then everyone suddenly starts milling about while waiting for someone else to be first to drop a hook, then we all row over and say "uh, do you mind if I raft alongside?"
    Weird. I’ve been in that exact same situation too, but somehow always in the role of the sucker instead of the leech. The struggle is real, folks. <sigh>

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Anchor buddy probably works best in a lunch hook situation, or on a lake or river without any tidal action. No way a guy could set up a clothesline with a large group of boats around.

    I've been in situations where a bunch of us sail into a small cove for lunch and then everyone suddenly starts milling about while waiting for someone else to be first to drop a hook, then we all row over and say "uh, do you mind if I raft alongside?" People with slow boats might get there last, but they rarely have to be the lunchtime mothership.
    What's this about "everyone" and "we all" and "a bunch of us?" I can't remember the last time I wasn't alone out there in a small sail & oar boat. No such thing as a crowded anchorage that I've managed to find. Well, there are crowded anchorages. But I just avoid them, or pass through as quickly as possible. Usually just stop long enough for the people on the big boats to give me food and cold beers before heading out to my own little corner of the Great Lakes for the night.

    It really is a nice way to cruise. I think the last "people" who came close to where I was anchored were otters.

    Tom
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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    What's this about "everyone" and "we all" and "a bunch of us?" I can't remember the last time I wasn't alone out there in a small sail & oar boat. No such thing as a crowded anchorage that I've managed to find...
    Tom
    Tom -- re-read the title of this thread. ;-) As I said earlier, "I'm guessing that the limitations of shore access and camping spots may be a big issue for the S-100, and am planning on sleeping aboard my CY whenever possible." Some of these parks and other locations are set up for a fraction of the Salish 100 fleet, so we can expect some logistical issues. The organizers and sponsors are doing their best, so I'm sure it will be a wonderful event!
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    Ha! Lots of good info. The S-100 should be sponsored by Greenfield Products, the manufacturer of the Anchor Buddy. My only experience with cruising the PNW is on big boats, where you factor in the tidal range when paying out your scope. I'm trying not to have to buy a whole bunch of gear to participate, but I want to be prepared. I have a little grapnel anchor kit, which probably isn't sufficient. I like small Danforth style anchors for these kind of applications. They store pretty flat. Once again, probably will install hatch in foredeck for this kind of storage.

    One thing I've seen in pics of the Everglades Challenge and the Texas 200 (which have much less of a tidal range) are those yellow, inflatable beach rollers. They allow relatively large boats to be rolled up onto the beach by a couple of guys. I'm sure that we can all count on someone giving us a hand if needed. The high tide lines are pretty visible in the PNW, as there's usually literally tons of driftwood.

    Speaking of inflatable things, after being swamped at Duck Dodge in my Eastport pram, I bought two of those Holt buoyancy bags the kids tuck into their Optis. They fit perfectly right under the center thwart in the CLC prams. Unfortunately, that would also take up a considerable amount of room for gear and provisions.

    Also, I have almost no rowing experience. I tried one afternoon in the Passagemaker and the mast/boom were in the way. I was also in the middle of Saratoga Passage, so had no visual to determine how much way I was making. Stowing the oars along the gunwales also takes up a bit of room and possibly interferes with the jibsheets. I'll have to do some practice runs before the event and decide if the trolling motor makes more sense.

    So here's a short list on the top of my head of the mods that I have to make to the boat. One is the hatch in the foredeck to allow access to that storage space. Another is I have to add a reef to the mainsail. I'm also going to either build a poor man's roller furler or a downhaul on the jib for quick dousing. What, if anything, do you guys need to do to your boats to be better prepped for a 100 mile cruise?

    Things I'm looking at buying are possibly one of those beach rollers $70, a small Danforth anchor $20 and the big ticket item is the hatch, unless I figure out how to make one of those okoume flush-mount style hatches like they do on kayaks. Hmmm, I just thought of that. My deck is painted, so that would be pretty easy to do. Also, I wouldn't be constrained by the size/shape the plastic hatches come in. Reminds me of a job interview question I once was asked "Why are manhole covers round?"

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Newport, OR
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    This would be interesting with a portage set up from Allyn to Belfair and going up the Hood Canal to PT. Tahuya, Dewatto, Holly, Pleasant Harbor would all be great places to stop and duck out of the wind. A lot less big boat traffic to worry about.
    1973 Grand Banks 42

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Shoreline, Washington
    Posts
    2,345

    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    This is not shaping up to be a secluded cruising event. It looks like a big road rally.
    Clothesline mooring is an important tool for small boat cruising. Particularly if you appreciate sleeping aboard. It is also the most complex solution for tending the boat. I have been in anchorages where 4, 5, or 6 clotheslines have been a CF. There is a bit of a learning curve. If you are serious about this kind of recreation, by all means develop your clothesline system. But possible congestion at this event with this many boats may not be the best opportunity to practice.

    Be open to the alternatives. Many have been mentioned. Raft up. Pull 'em up on the beach, assuming adequate tent sites or alternate bunks - plenty of extra hands. Understand the hi and lo tidelines, and general timing.

    Anchor Buddies - a quick look at the tide tables will tell you what the overnight exchange will be. It may be quite small, in which case an anchor buddy will keep your boat off the beach overnight no problem. You can then choose to sleep on or off the boat. In conjunction with the tide tables, carry a lead line. And a timepiece.

    Anchor out. Know thyself. Scamper off the beach towards dusk. Scamper in first thing in the morning.

    Or just mimic someone who seems to know what they are doing and hope for the best.

    As Yeadon pointed out, the Puget Sound MAPTECH waterproof chart does the job, along with basic tide tables. To understand tidal currents in more detail, TIDAL CURRENTS OF PUGET SOUND, coupled with Captain Jacks.
    Eric

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    16,001

    Default Re: The Salish 100 - Olympia to Port Townsend, June 22-28, 2019

    CaptainS -

    Considering the extreme space limitations you have, I suspect they'll be others with beach rollers. You'll want either very tall rubber boots or waders to do that sort of thing -- which you may want anyway. I'd spend the money on good rubber boots and rely on others to help roll or carry your craft.

    The Holt bags are great ( I also have two) but as above you don't have room. With all the others in the fleet and motherships, any swamping should be handled by other boats coming to your assistance. With a wooden boat and sealed gear bags you'll have plenty of flotation.

    Learn to row and practice it! The whole trolling motor thing is a Newbie move -- made it myself when just starting in small boats -- but not really all that handy in a very small boat. Unless you tote that heavy heavy battery around the docks and carry a charger, you'll run out of juice just when you need it most.

    You'll need to strike your rig to row efficiently and comfortably, as you're right that the mast position gets seriously in the way -- so practice that also. It will probably tie alongside you but might have to hang over the bow or stern -=- hard to say. If you rig a topping lift you should be able to raise the boom and row short distances and only be limited by the mast position.

    Use a commercial screw-in plastic hatch. Otherwise you'll lose the flotation capabilities if the boat goes more than 1' underwater and the ply hatch blows off -- which you're worried about, right?

    Pick up a decent Danforth knock-off, 15' of chain and at least 50' of anchor line. Carry more anchor line (100' is nice) and your grapnel to run to the beach if you ever anchor off.


    Eric -

    Yes, yours is great advice from someone who's been there. ;-) The mess of anchor and boat trolley lines is another reason why I'm considering an inflatable raft or yak as a tender -- lets me anchor or moor further out or in non-trolley locations.
    Last edited by Thorne; 01-17-2019 at 12:00 PM.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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