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Thread: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

  1. #71
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    The 57 year old brown glue in the boat I'm restoring continues to fail, even as I work on it. Just a fine powdery light brown residue left.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Very old 308 resin Jeff.
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  3. #73
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    The short open time of Titebond 3 doesn't make the cut for something like a mast lamination.

    Mark

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Think I mentioned this before a few years back...
    There is a yard in the SOF that built a sitka spar for a classic, all 160 odd feet of it. They used an industrial melamine glue after accelerated aging tests in Germany. It was covered in an issue of Classic Boat. Since I was about to build a mast (a bit smaller....) I gave them a ring and asked about the glue. As mentioned above, it was a modified UF type. It was only sold in large quantities and they had used it all up, otherwise he would have sent me what was left over..

  5. #75
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    The 57 year old brown glue in the boat I'm restoring continues to fail, even as I work on it. Just a fine powdery light brown residue left.
    So anyone over 40 has nothing to worry about?

    Someone here might know where to find your glue; http://fnqflyers.com/local-groups/
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  6. #76
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew2 View Post
    Think I mentioned this before a few years back...
    There is a yard in the SOF that built a sitka spar for a classic, all 160 odd feet of it. They used an industrial melamine glue after accelerated aging tests in Germany. It was covered in an issue of Classic Boat. Since I was about to build a mast (a bit smaller....) I gave them a ring and asked about the glue. As mentioned above, it was a modified UF type. It was only sold in large quantities and they had used it all up, otherwise he would have sent me what was left over..
    I reckon you'd need several issues of classic boat to cover a 160 foot mast. Kind of a decoupage effect. Kind of tacky, interesting in a Kath and Kim sort of a way, but it would keep the UV out.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    ive finally decided that I will move to using the epoxy glue.

    from my enquiries last week...

    I followed up on some batch numbers for the glue sold to me by Nightingale. The glue they sold was 'out of date' pure and simple. Their own TDS stipulated a shelf life of 12 months for both resin and hardener. The stock I got was past this date. Furthermore, I had no reassurance from them that it had been stored in optimal conditions. Who knows if they leave the bulk supply outside in the sun? This company is the worst to date to have dealt with. Its a wonder they are still in business.

    I got hold of Jowat Australia. They initially told us they would only sell in 1000kg lots. Their story changed last week when I called and revisited the notion of buying direct from them. The outcome: I would be able to buy any small quantity as needed.

    I was informed their glue (which is what they sell to Nightingale) "would be good for 4 years" and the manager continued to 'talk around' the subject of shelf life (... waffle... waffle...).
    Nothing in his statements compared with the shelf life in the Jowat TDS.
    I asked for a written guarantee or date of manufacture but this detail was left out of the email I received with the TDS and the per unit price (kg) for base and hardener. So, if these people can be so flippant, then Ive lost all interest in trying to drag information out of them. Quite frankly, I dont trust any of them to tell the truth about the shelf life let alone question how the product has been stored. I got the feeling, Jowat were keen to sell off their current (and quite possibly 'old') stock.
    Last edited by Bernadette; 11-11-2018 at 06:12 AM.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    so, which epoxy?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Stirring is necessary...
    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Thanks, Bernadette, for making us privy to your thought processes. I think it helps to keep the practice - as opposed to the theoretical 'best' - in mind.

    And especial thanks for reminding everyone how important it is to find good suppliers you can lean on.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

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  11. #81
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Thanks, Bernadette, for making us privy to your thought processes. I think it helps to keep the practice - as opposed to the theoretical 'best' - in mind.

    And especial thanks for reminding everyone how important it is to find good suppliers you can lean on.

    ...well I would have thought the manager from Jowat who was touted a being the person with all the knowledge, would not have made the statement that the resin and hardener is good for 4 years storage given the Jowat TDS says its only good for 12 months! He went on to say that it would be impossible to store enough product for 4 years supply (or words similar to that effect)...and I wasn't sure what he meant nor did I understand the point he was trying to get across. Needless to say, I didnt pursue it at the time because he wasn't spontaneously make all the right reassurances I needed to hear!

    Dad was privy to the conversation as I had my phone on speaker: his remark after the conversation had ended, "just another salesman trying to make another sale at any cost".
    I do so much enjoy the way Dad drops things down to the most fundamental element. He is too often correct (!) and we forget these days that all the nonsense in life is just that...nonsense.
    I had made up my mind though not to proceed with Jowat right about the time the manager said the glue was good for 4 years. Why would anyone say that when it contradicts the TDS?

    David, its been my pleasure to have so much help from forum members and im grateful to the interest my quest has generated.
    Im not a big fan of epoxy but Ive given the search for resorcinol my best and I really cant justify spending $2000 + on international shipping. If Doug at MZ3 in Perth had made some I would have bought it in a flash. Never mind though that he hasn't. He has however, been most generous and kind with his advice on the phone.

    As a health professional, doing the right thing and providing a good service is paramount to my work so I guess I often have high expectations. Beats me how other professions/industries don't deliver 'good' service.

    The question of shelf life is simple: is the product in date or not? Yes or no? Thats all that needed to be answered.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    so, which epoxy?
    well I'll be guided by what others suggest as I have no real experience with epoxies...
    the g flex seems to be a front runner at present...mix it up, slap it on, tighten down the jig and hey presto! a glued up mast!
    Last edited by Bernadette; 11-11-2018 at 04:42 PM.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    If you want a long working time, you might be better off with West 105 resin and 209 hardener than G-Flex. It is stronger, stiffer and has a longer pot life. Silver quandong is supposed to glue well, so you don't need anything fancy. (G/Flex is strong enough, so stronger is nice, but not critical. The working time might be a bigger deal.)

    G-Flex is toughened, which is nice for impact, but I don''t think you will see the difference here. When bonding small parts to metal, toughness is a major factor, but laminating wood, not so much. I don't know what you can find for fillers to thicken epoxy, but I would look for generic microfibers or wood flour. West fillers are fine, and contain a little fumed silica to make them handle nicely, but you pay through the nose for the brand name.

    System 3 has a slow hardener, as do most others.

    https://www.westsystem.com/wp-conten...anual-2015.pdf

    https://www.westsystem.com/wp-conten...xy-Resin-1.pdf

    http://www.highgaincomposites.com/img/2016722182028.pdf G/flex Epoxy

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/10...25522554198805 System 3
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  14. #84
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Thanks Dave, I will read up on the literature tonight. Tomorrow Im off to Cairns and will see what the costs are for the glue.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    WEST Systems technical support is top notch: https://www.westsystem.com/contact/
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    I like West System epoxy because for me it has not caused any sensitivity issues. (Some brands have made me pretty miserable) Milled cotton fibers is my go-to filler for strength. That is available from other providers, but West does sell it in 20 pound boxes.
    Good luck with your quest...
    I have found that West system epoxy is amazing. Their book is very good, and now free. https://www.westsystem.com/wp-conten...k-061205-1.pdf
    My first test was butting two 2x4's end to end. Painting them with a coat to soak in, then mixing cotton fibers into the pot, coating the butt ends and pushing them together and closing the doors for the day. No clamps, nothing. 24 hours later I could stand on the joint, had to bounce on it for a while before the stick split, but not at the glue joint!

  17. #87
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    West has always been good for me too.I think you've made the right decision regarding the resorcinol considering the use by prevaricating by the distributors.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    FYI, we used system 3 with milled cotton fibers for thickening. Had the longest pot life vs temp range for us and we easy to source. I had also looked at using Raka epoxy, I'm sure most will be ok.

    Mark

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernadette View Post
    well I'll be guided by what others suggest as I have no real experience with epoxies...
    the g flex seems to be a front runner at present...mix it up, slap it on, tighten down the jig and hey presto! a glued up mast!
    Dont tighten down the jig too much! Epoxy doesnt do so well in a starved glue joint. Leave your fraying surfaces a bit rough, if you have planed them lovely and smooth whack them with some really coarse sandpaper, like 24 grit, or a rasp, across the grain. I know, but do it. Paint both surfaces with unthickened epoxy first. You might even want to let that go off, and then wash with soapy water to remove any blush. Then you have a good non porous but rough surface to glue. Then go ahead and do your glueing. But it ain't resorcinol and does not want too much clamping.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Dont tighten down the jig too much! Epoxy doesnt do so well in a starved glue joint. Leave your fraying surfaces a bit rough, if you have planed them lovely and smooth whack them with some really coarse sandpaper, like 24 grit, or a rasp, across the grain. I know, but do it. Paint both surfaces with unthickened epoxy first. You might even want to let that go off, and then wash with soapy water to remove any blush. Then you have a good non porous but rough surface to glue. Then go ahead and do your glueing. But it ain't resorcinol and does not want too much clamping.

    thanks Phil.
    what I dont understand though is the need for thickened epoxy. I was just going to use the 'mixture' as it comes out of the can and not add any thickening to it. the mating surfaces will be close as close can be and no need for a filling agent. im not expecting any heavy glue lines...even with resorcinol...thats why I dont get bothered by seeing the dark glue line when using resorcinol.

    I take the point about not clamping down too hard. I wonder what would be considered ideal tension on the bolts of the jig? any thoughts/suggestions????

  21. #91
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    If you follow Phil's advice, you will still get a decent joint, BUT...
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Dont tighten down the jig too much! Epoxy doesnt do so well in a starved glue joint.
    <<This is why you add some filler. It helps maintain some thickness.>>
    Leave your fraying surfaces a bit rough, if you have planed them lovely and smooth whack them with some really coarse sandpaper, like 24 grit, or a rasp, across the grain. I know, but do it.
    <<Please read the FPL Handbook Chapter 10 Page 3 before you bruise the surface and weaken the bond.>>
    Paint both surfaces with unthickened epoxy first. You might even want to let that go off, and then wash with soapy water to remove any blush. Then you have a good non porous but rough surface to glue. Then go ahead and do your glueing.
    <<You won't get a good chemical bond to cured epoxy. It will be a decent bond, but not as strong. If you want to work harder, not smarter, Let it cure, wash the blush and THEN roughen the EPOXY surface as recommended above.>>
    But it ain't resorcinol and does not want too much clamping.
    <<No argument here>>
    Quote Originally Posted by Bernadette View Post
    thanks Phil.
    what I dont understand though is the need for thickened epoxy. I was just going to use the 'mixture' as it comes out of the can and not add any thickening to it. the mating surfaces will be close as close can be and no need for a filling agent. im not expecting any heavy glue lines...even with resorcinol...thats why I dont get bothered by seeing the dark glue line when using resorcinol.

    I take the point about not clamping down too hard. I wonder what would be considered ideal tension on the bolts of the jig? any thoughts/suggestions????
    Filler helps maintain some thickness, in part because the thin resin won't run out of a gap before it sets up. It also makes it harder to squeeze out too much epoxy, making the clamping force less important. You want about 0.005" (0.125mm) thickness. Unlike the shelf life issue, this isn't aerospace, and the thickness is a guideline, not an absolute. There some acrylics like 3M DP8005 where the thickness is important enough that they have glass beads in the adhesive to guarantee the bond thickness.
    You want some squeeze out. The air bubbles squeeze out more easily than the glop. Nice and snug, but don't try to crush it.

    Title: Wood Handbook, Chapter 10: Adhesives with Wood Materials- Bond Formation and Performance
    Publication: General Technical Report FPL-GTR-190. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory: 10-1 - 10-24. Chapter 10.
    Author(s) Frihart, Charles R.; Hunt, Christopher G.;
    Year: 2010
    View PDF https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/f...chapter_10.pdf » view abstract, download publication »

    Wood Handbook by chapter: https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/p...rouping_id=100
    Abrasive planing with grit sizes from 24 to 60 causes surface and subsurface crushing of wood cells. The adhesive industry typically recommends 60–80 grit sanding as acceptable for wood bonding as this equates to 24 to 30 knife marks per inch when planing. Generally, anything above 200 grit fuzzes the wood surface and is not recommended.
    Figure 10–2 shows bondlines of undamaged, knife-planed Douglas-fir lumber (A) compared with bondlines between surfaces damaged by abrasive planing (B). Such damaged surfaces are inherently weak and result in poor bond strength. If abrasive planing is to be used before bonding, belts must be kept clean and sharp, and sanding dust must be removed completely from the surface. However, abrasive planing is not recommended for structural joints that will be subjected to high swelling and shrinkage stresses from water soaking and drying.
    Capture a.JPG
    Last edited by MN Dave; 11-12-2018 at 05:33 PM. Reason: missing link
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  22. #92
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    As an alternative to letting it fully kick and then washing/roughing, allow it to cure to a "gel" state, add thickened epoxy and clamp or vacuum bag. This is the layup schedule typically used on high load items like helicopter rotor blades. If you choose G-Flex, check with West, however. I don't have any experience with that as yet and I don't know if that schedule works with it. Looking forward to seeing your final choice and process!

  23. #93
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    As an alternative to letting it fully kick and then washing/roughing, allow it to cure to a "gel" state, add thickened epoxy and clamp or vacuum bag. This is the layup schedule typically used on high load items like helicopter rotor blades. If you choose G-Flex, check with West, however. I don't have any experience with that as yet and I don't know if that schedule works with it. Looking forward to seeing your final choice and process!
    That sounds like an autoclave cured B-stage epoxy. Those epoxies don't fully cure at room temperature and will stay in the fairly solid half-cured B-stage for months if stored in a refrigerator. The B-stage prepreg (cloth wetted out and half cured) is laid up on a mold, all the air is vacuumed out and then cured with heat and pressure. When the prepreg is heated, the partially cured epoxy melts, so the prepreg can conform exactly to the mold and all the gaps fill with resin.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  24. #94
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernadette View Post
    thanks Phil.
    what I dont understand though is the need for thickened epoxy. I was just going to use the 'mixture' as it comes out of the can and not add any thickening to it. the mating surfaces will be close as close can be and no need for a filling agent. im not expecting any heavy glue lines...even with resorcinol...thats why I dont get bothered by seeing the dark glue line when using resorcinol.

    I take the point about not clamping down too hard. I wonder what would be considered ideal tension on the bolts of the jig? any thoughts/suggestions????
    The glue "needs" no pressure, only contact.
    The standard procedure is to wet down both surfaces of the glue joint with unthickened epoxy and let it absorb into the wood a bit. Then apply thickened epoxy and assemble. The filler (milled fibers in this instance) will prevent excess squeeze out and glue starvation. I learned this the hard way! Years of fitting and gluing techniques developed around glues that shrink and need significant clamping pressure to bond was in direct contradiction to epoxy techniques.
    Chapter 12 (on scarfing) explains this technique.

    (209 hardener is the slowest with almost twice the working time of the "slow" and should give a comfortable working time).

  25. #95
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    That sounds like an autoclave cured B-stage epoxy. .
    Basically it is. I did some experimentation with a friend working for Hexcel (on rotor blades among other things) and we tried it with regular West System epoxies at room temperatures and it worked out well. We bonded several different materials and couldn't get the bond to fail, but that was pretty short duration...no opportunity to test for creep or longevity tests. When I can I still use that for my bonding schedule (when I can) and have had no failures to date. I've busted the wooden bits, but haven't had a joint fail ... yet

  26. #96
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    If you follow Phil's advice, you will still get a decent joint, BUT...


    Filler helps maintain some thickness, in part because the thin resin won't run out of a gap before it sets up. It also makes it harder to squeeze out too much epoxy, making the clamping force less important. You want about 0.005" (0.125mm) thickness. Unlike the shelf life issue, this isn't aerospace, and the thickness is a guideline, not an absolute. There some acrylics like 3M DP8005 where the thickness is important enough that they have glass beads in the adhesive to guarantee the bond thickness.
    You want some squeeze out. The air bubbles squeeze out more easily than the glop. Nice and snug, but don't try to crush it.

    Title: Wood Handbook, Chapter 10: Adhesives with Wood Materials- Bond Formation and Performance
    Publication: General Technical Report FPL-GTR-190. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory: 10-1 - 10-24. Chapter 10.
    Author(s) Frihart, Charles R.; Hunt, Christopher G.;
    Year: 2010
    View PDF https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/f...chapter_10.pdf » view abstract, download publication »

    Wood Handbook by chapter: https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/p...rouping_id=100
    thank you very much Dave. I really do appreciate you taking the time and effort to help me out.
    Ive printed out the documents and will spend the time reading up before proceeding.

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    As an alternative to letting it fully kick and then washing/roughing, allow it to cure to a "gel" state, add thickened epoxy and clamp or vacuum bag. This is the layup schedule typically used on high load items like helicopter rotor blades. If you choose G-Flex, check with West, however. I don't have any experience with that as yet and I don't know if that schedule works with it. Looking forward to seeing your final choice and process!
    I went for the R105 resin because I couldn't see any real advantages in using Gflex.

    I purchased H206 slow hardener (needed for our climate coupled with the size of the job) and also the H209 super slow hardener...to trial and compare with the 206.

    My supplier is over 120 km away so its best to have available options on hand when starting out with a new product (for me). Its certainly more costly but I figure if Ive got the choice between the two I can get a feel for what I might want to continue with when starting on laminating the entire spar and not just the scraph joints which I will start with.

    I also purchased some 413 microfibre blend but Im not sure this is the correct stuff to use as a filler/thickening agent. Ive got to do more reading to figure this one out unless someone can advise otherwise? Incidentally thats 413 and not 403...as per the literature/not a typo.

    The glueing surfaces were run through the thickener and I wont be touching them again with a sander.

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    I don't want to be accused of complicating things, but when it's an issue a very good way to avoid glue starvation is to lay a layer of 2 oz. glass cloth between the laminations. That also adds stiffness in both directions and helps to prevent splitting perpendicular to the laminations.

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Its probably not worth repeating the same point but.....

    Epoxy glue is probably the way to go, its well understood, widely available, easily protected and is an excellent inexpensive all round adhesive. I've read all the arguments for and against it in typical boat building applications and to be frank 90% of people have an agenda that isn't based on reality, often it's just about trying to save money (I am talking structural work here). I regularly sail on a boat built in 1960 with epoxy and its as stiff, watertight and sound as the day it was launched. If you're careful with epoxy and clear finished spars you can pigment it, then it will look like resorcinol . UV degradation on the tiny exposed part of the joint is meh, just forget about it. UV is only really an issue on coated spars. For a true invisible glueline then one of the clear glues Aerolite? are required but what I find is that things like invisible glue line concerns or aesthetic considerations are rendered irrelevant as the spar becomes seasoned with use. Having built a few birdsmouths, there is so much glue area than you can afford a thin glue line that is virtually undetectable anyway. PVA's are also excellent adhesives but I would not be tempted on a larger project despite many advantages over epoxy in certain applications.
    whatever rocks your boat

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    I see youve already got epoxy, great! The trick in a hot climate is super slow hardener and doing the glue up first thing with helper(s). Dry fit, test run and get everything ready to rock and roll. Be sure to brush on a coat neat, then use a thin mix of resin and fibres. If your joints are good you wont need a thick brew.
    whatever rocks your boat

  31. #101
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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul G. View Post
    Its probably not worth repeating the same point but.....

    Epoxy glue is probably the way to go, its well understood, widely available, easily protected and is an excellent inexpensive all round adhesive. I've read all the arguments for and against it in typical boat building applications and to be frank 90% of people have an agenda that isn't based on reality, often it's just about trying to save money (I am talking structural work here). I regularly sail on a boat built in 1960 with epoxy and its as stiff, watertight and sound as the day it was launched. If you're careful with epoxy and clear finished spars you can pigment it, then it will look like resorcinol . UV degradation on the tiny exposed part of the joint is meh, just forget about it. UV is only really an issue on coated spars. For a true invisible glueline then one of the clear glues Aerolite? are required but what I find is that things like invisible glue line concerns or aesthetic considerations are rendered irrelevant as the spar becomes seasoned with use. Having built a few birdsmouths, there is so much glue area than you can afford a thin glue line that is virtually undetectable anyway. PVA's are also excellent adhesives but I would not be tempted on a larger project despite many advantages over epoxy in certain applications.
    Not as cheap as I thought it might be...Ive got 8 Lt resin, 2.1 Ltr hardener (206 & 209 inclusive), 4 Ltr microfibre, 3:1 dispensing pumps and plastic spreaders = $566.
    I will probably need more resin and hardener.

    So far, this glue is more expensive than what the cost for resorcinol would have been. BUT! I get to glue up knowing Im using good product and for that I get peace of mind. Plus I get to learn some more about epoxy glues!

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    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernadette View Post
    Not as cheap as I thought it might be...Ive got 8 Lt resin, 2.1 Ltr hardener (206 & 209 inclusive), 4 Ltr microfibre, 3:1 dispensing pumps and plastic spreaders = $566.
    I will probably need more resin and hardener.

    So far, this glue is more expensive than what the cost for resorcinol would have been. BUT! I get to glue up knowing Im using good product and for that I get peace of mind. Plus I get to learn some more about epoxy glues!
    The 209 is 3:1 Bern, but the 205 is 5:1, a different pump for the hardener.

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    2,276

    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    403 is 413. I had never heard of 413. When I looked it up, they said "WEST SYSTEM® 413 (previously called 403) is a mix of cotton microfibre and colloidal silica". Having previously recommended microfiber, I have to say that it was a good choice.

    As for strength, you have to try hard to go wrong. The neat resin has a tensile strength around 10,000psi. The weakest thickeners are glass or phenolic microballoons that reduce that by half and the strongest is some variant of carbon or glass fibers that will do no better than double the strength. The microballoon mix is strong enough, not that anyone would recommend it.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    11,777

    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I second the notion of epoxy. West's g-flex is the best sort for spars, but standard epoxy will work ok too. I bet MAS can recommend something.

    I am also a fan of g-flex for spars and some joint applications. West epoxy and thier fillers are exceptional off the shelf products. I am fastly becoming a West 6 ten epoxy adhesive fan due to caulk styled cartridge applications that come pre-thickened. No measuring, point, sneeze and trowel application.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 11-14-2018 at 12:43 AM.
    King Moonraiser:
    A toy is never truly happy until it is loved by a child.


  35. #105
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    north queensland
    Posts
    2,658

    Default Re: resorcinol glue...now desperatly seeking supplier

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    The 209 is 3:1 Bern, but the 205 is 5:1, a different pump for the hardener.
    yes, I couldn't buy a 5:1 pump...they had none in stock. so I'll measure it by weight
    the shop I bought from really didn't have a big range of west system products.

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