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Thread: Cruising the Sands

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    I love this thread! Thank you for posting your adventures. I love the boat -and especially sail- loving attitude in the Netherlands, and your Wizard catamaran is a great looking example of a great design from Richard Woods.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Thanks Alrotch, I will continue, and I am glad that such an anecdotical way, switching between boats and people, works.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Late to this thread but I am enjoying it.

    Looking forward to more.
    Alex

    "He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    My 'sands sailer' couldn't be more different, a canoe with a leeboard and now a lateen sail, but originally a balanced lug.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Thanks Alex, Skuthorp, I see, and I will find us a few cute little boats now. With leeboards.DSC_0093.jpgDSC_0150.jpgnieuwjaarskaart.jpg
    Here my sons are on expedition in the 'Barre Barentstochten' as we call them. In Harlingen a replica is built from the expeditionship from Heemskerk and Willen Barents, who set out to find a seaway around the north to India. The were shipwrecked and lost their ship. Built a house on shore, Spitsbergen, and left it next summer. Rowed and sailed 2000 km and found another Dutch trader who brought them back to Amsterdam. In A.D.1596. We are sailing replica boats to get the feeling and to get some attention to the replica of the big ship.
    These boats use only one leeboard, that just came in vogue then, probably from the Spanish with whom The Republic was engaged in what later was named 'The 80 year war'.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    20181113_150603.jpg20181113_150622.jpg20181113_150640.jpg This is a halfsize shipboat that Gerald de Weerd, builder of the big ship, made for his grandchildren, who were brought up with stories about the 'Barre Barentstochten'. He (Gerald ) told me last saturday how his kids were having fun and learned to sail that very day, sailing in kneedeep water, playing with sheets and leeboard. When they were near the edge of the shallow shelf he became a bit worried: 'Could they turn back'? Ofcourse they could.
    He made these drawings and will probably make them available to other grandfathers.
    Some stout oak, cheap 4 mm plywood, epoxy and paint. His wife sewed the sails from light cloth.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    More good stuff! Neat boats! Great history and good sailing!

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Quote Originally Posted by FF View Post
    20181113_150603.jpg20181113_150622.jpg20181113_150640.jpg This is a halfsize shipboat that Gerald de Weerd, builder of the big ship, made for his grandchildren, who were brought up with stories about the 'Barre Barentstochten'. He (Gerald ) told me last saturday how his kids were having fun and learned to sail that very day, sailing in kneedeep water, playing with sheets and leeboard. When they were near the edge of the shallow shelf he became a bit worried: 'Could they turn back'? Ofcourse they could.
    He made these drawings and will probably make them available to other grandfathers.
    Some stout oak, cheap 4 mm plywood, epoxy and paint. His wife sewed the sails from light cloth.
    If I just had a few numbers to fill in those drawings, I could totally find a kid to build one of those for. What a charming little boat!
    I even know where I might can get some oak in the right shapes for the stem profiles.

    Peace,
    Robert

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Thad, thanks for your comment.
    Rob, I will let Gerald know how you feel about the little boat. I also think she deserves to be built. I asked him to sent the plan to WoodenBoat.
    There a a few youtube films of the full size boats but I am not smart enough to post them. My kids very busy. But it will come . Frank

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Our first leg with the ship boats was with a very light southerly wind for three days and we went from Enkhuizen to Harlingen, mostly on the Ijsselmeer. The following year we decided it was about time to tackle a trip from Harlingen to Terschelling and back, to add tides to the adventure. This time I had a few old friends with me in one boat, all around 60 years, grizzled boatbuilders, and one sailmaker, me, and my oldest son with friends in the other boat, the beautiful young people. DSCN7036.jpgDSCN7035.jpgDSCN7083.jpgDSCN7133.jpgDSCN7136.jpg

    We arrived first on Terschelling and left the boat anchored just outside the dike. Later the byp arrived. I prepared a meal with beans, bacon and onions. Next morning I knocked on the door of the cabin where the young ones slept: 'Dad, go away'. 'But you wil miss the tide'. We arrived again first and they had to accept a tow.

    We found that by using incoming and outgoing tide you can go anywhere on the Waddenzee, but it helps to get out of bed on an unchristian hour sometimes.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Quote Originally Posted by FF View Post
    Our first leg with the ship boats was with a very light southerly wind for three days and we went from Enkhuizen to Harlingen, mostly on the Ijsselmeer. The following year we decided it was about time to tackle a trip from Harlingen to Terschelling and back, to add tides to the adventure. This time I had a few old friends with me in one boat, all around 60 years, grizzled boatbuilders, and one sailmaker, me, and my oldest son with friends in the other boat, the beautiful young people. DSCN7036.jpgDSCN7035.jpgDSCN7083.jpgDSCN7133.jpgDSCN7136.jpg

    We arrived first on Terschelling and left the boat anchored just outside the dike. Later the byp arrived. I prepared a meal with beans, bacon and onions. Next morning I knocked on the door of the cabin where the young ones slept: 'Dad, go away'. 'But you wil miss the tide'. We arrived again first and they had to accept a tow.

    We found that by using incoming and outgoing tide you can go anywhere on the Waddenzee, but it helps to get out of bed on an unchristian hour sometimes.
    Frank,
    Please feel free to post as many pictures of these boats as possible. I find these vessels very lovely. The shape, the rig, the single leeboard!

    Any good links to finding more info about the type?

    I love this thread.

    Peace,
    Robert

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Rob, they were generally shipboats in the 17th century, and Gerald de Weert designed this boat. I think the rig was more modern then the rig that was used in 1596 and will post a picture of a print of that time. I will also ask Gerald when his plans are ready. My friend Bert van Baar, the greybeard on the first picture, built several of them. We found the boats very good in thin waters, also towed them when it was to shallow to row, then we walked. Only fault was the clamp to kept them in place, it soon broke, and Bert growled the stupid client wanted clamps instead of rope.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Frank,

    Thank you. I find them lovely, and they look a fine boat for the water I live near. I like the shape, and the single tholes, and the oars, and...

    C287240C-FBC7-4AE8-AE37-5FAE387A12CA.jpg
    These are my duck punt oars, and my new favorite rowing oars. I made them based on some currach oars I saw. I could very much enjoy those long bladed strop hung oars on those shipboats.

    Anyway. I always enjoy learning about new things, and I really love building models, so if nothing else, I can build myself a model shipboat.
    Of course, if I build one of those child sized ones, Ill give it away to some kid. Why not ruin some other soul by luring them to the shoreside, and teaching them to hear the call of the water.

    Isn't it the water that calls?

    Peace,
    Robert

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    good idea Rob, and your oars look fine to me.
    I texted the designer to hurry with the plans and post more boaties. Frankhttp://forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.gifhttp://forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.gifhttp://forum.woodenboat.com/images/athttp://forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.giftach/jpg.gifhttp://forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.gif
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    I think its the big, rounded, bluff sheer forward I like so much. Something about the boat really strikes a chord. Lovely.

    Did I mention my affinity for sprit sails, too? Hahaha.

    There are some cycling related things Id have to do and see first, should I ever get over there, but mercy Id love to take a ride in one of these shipboats.
    Seeing them and learning about them is the next best thing, though. Thanks to technology!

    Peace,
    Robert

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    So cool. Thanks for posting. I've got an English twin keel and get a kick when drying out on the tide.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    The boatbuilding industry here was not so interested in bilgekeelers and centreboarders so these were imported. They preferred to build keelboats, cruiser/racers, and maybe that was a good thing for our shallow waters. De marina's around the Ijsselmeer are full with those boats and they stay west of the line Harlingen-Terschelling.
    The english were fortunate to have an influential designer like Maurice Griffiths but we had Ir. J. Loeff, editor of 'De Zeilsport', the dutch sail bible. Loeff felt that a 'proper yacht' was roundbilge with a deep ballast keel. When he reviewed a catboat from Charles Witholz he had nothing but contempt for the boat, that would have been perfect for our waters. If you wanted to sail the Waddenzee you needed a heavy traditional oak but preferably steel flatbottomed boat that could be registered in the 'Stamboek Rond and Platbodems'. Some types would have benefitted from plywood, like scows, but it was frowned upon. No crossovers but segregration, almost 'Apartheid'.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    The video of our trip from Harlingen to the island Terschelling, its mostly about the trip itself and you can see how the boats perform.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    I had to make 2 posts because I'm only allowed to submit 1 video per post.

    And from the year before from Enkhuizen to Harlingen via Hindeloopen

    Here my son gets interviewed in Dutch where he tells about how tough it must have been for the original crew. Also he talks about how "sad" it is that current generation barely knows anything about the Dutch hero that Willem Barentsz was.
    This tour also got a lot of attention in the media, from videos, radio interviews and articles in several news papers.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Quote Originally Posted by FF View Post
    I had to make 2 posts because I'm only allowed to submit 1 video per post.

    And from the year before from Enkhuizen to Harlingen via Hindeloopen

    Here my son gets interviewed in Dutch where he tells about how tough it must have been for the original crew. Also he talks about how "sad" it is that current generation barely knows anything about the Dutch hero that Willem Barentsz was.
    This tour also got a lot of attention in the media, from videos, radio interviews and articles in several news papers.
    Okay. Settled. I want to sail on that boat, and have your son narrate the voyage! What a charming young man.

    I particularly liked the turkshead stop for the snotter. Lovely, lovey boats.

    Thank you again, Frank, for sharing this with us all. This is, truly, the best use of this technology. I can see and hear and learn about boats Ill never see in person.

    Unless I build one...

    Peace,
    Just Totally Struck By These Boats

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Thanks Rob, am glad he posted the video's, I can't. Indeed proud of my boys.
    Later I will post more of the WillemBarentsz project, but for now I go back to the couch because the flu wears me out.
    Frank

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Btw, the intervieuwer speaks mostly the Frisian language, she is answered in Dutch. nice for Bobbys if he is around

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    I have a problem posting pictures. Hope to solve it end of the week when the expert returns.

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Thank FF, great thread.

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    http:/http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.gif/forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.gif This boat was rigged as a gaffschonner, with centreboard. Very good for these waters, and the owner asked me to make a junksail . PA190794.jpgPA190792.jpg
    The big boat is a replica from the WillemBarentsz expedition ship from 1596. The cut little leeboard spritrigged boats were her shipboats. The crew made a 2000km voyage in them from Nova Zembla to the Russian mainlan dand got back to Amsterdam the same year. We did 30 km to commemorate.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    the pictures do not end up where I want them.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Works anyway! Thanks. Be fun to see more of that build.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    I will show them,Thad, I saw her built iin stages, but pics came out upside or on side. I will have my son work it out if I cant fix it. Soon.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.gif Here the expeditionship of Willem Barentsz, the replica, is launched.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    The phrase "too shallow to row" struck a real note with me.

    Beautiful thread.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Great thread with great pictures!

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    What Jodie said , fabulous !

    Those little boats are really nice.

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    Thanks, Jodie and Beam reach. I will try some more. First big boat stuff.20181027_162114.jpg
    This is how the replica will look like. Still not very big.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    P8020539.jpgP8020538.jpg
    These foto's show the replica in the first stages. In the 16 century ships were built in Holland 'shell first', i.e. the keel was laid, stem and stern erected and a few frames were set up and the planking began. To keep the planks in line short pieces were added across the planking and when the bottom was complete the floors were added, while more planking was done. That way a ship could be built by a few specialized gangs in a few months. The hull was launched asap and the ship was finished in the water. This had several advantages: The fresh wood did not dry out, the ship would not capsize, and she damage was less likely with the lighter weight. In this replica the oak planks are fastened with wooden 'dowels', they got a small kerf at 90 degrees inside and out where a small wedge was hammered in to keep planks against frames. Iron ( I am not sure here what metal exactly ) was only used in stem and stern.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Cruising the Sands

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/attach/jpg.gif
    This is our favorite anchorage on Terschelling. There is a nearby pub from where we can oversee the approachhes to the harbour and often we find friends here drying out. When the water rises we find kitesurfers around us.
    On the background you can see the 'Brandaris', one of the oldest and most-loved lighthouses around the coast. We often plan to do a more ambitious cruise but the last two years we did not get farther then here. And ofcourse it is free.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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