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Thread: Changing motorcycles again

  1. #1
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    Default Changing motorcycles again

    Yup, I'm trading in the Honda Stateline, for a new bike.

    The Stateline was a BIG mistake... at least, for me. My old Honda Magna, which I rode for nearly 16 years, was near-perfect in terms of size, weight, and power, for the sort of riding I have always done. It was big enough to feel like a stable platform running down the highway at speed.... but light enough to feel nimble in local riding. I enjoy more of a cruiser seating style, and had equipped the Magna with forward foot controls, which made it really comfortable. The broad torque curve of the V-4 engine eliminated the need to constantly upshift or downshift to match the peak of the curve.

    However, after 16 years, I was sick of all the carburetor problems. The four carburetors, one for each cylinder, were buried deep below the tank and air filter, making service a very expensive process... and it seemed like every other spring, the bike wouldn't run properly, and needed a pricey 'carburetor clean-out'. I owned the service manual.... but not all the specialized tools... nor the required patience... to do it myself.

    So, I went shopping for a new bike... and got seduced by the 'look' of a leftover 2016 Stateline. With fuel injection and a shaft drive, it seemed like a good choice, in terms of reliability and minimal required service.

    Unfortunately, I didn't factor in the size and weight, nor the vibration of the narrow angle V-twin. It seemed like taking it out of the garage for a short ride was more work than it was worth. The handling was good (largely owing to the low center of gravity), but it took a lot of effort to muscle the bike around at low speeds or when parking. In short, it was really the wrong kind of bike, for me.

    So, I went 'shopping' for the right sort of bike, and settled on a Kawasaki Vulcan S. It's a 'cruiser' of sorts, but not really a cruiser under the skin. The engine is a version of the well-known 650 cc 'Ninja' engine, but with a heavier flywheel, and ported and tuned for a much broader torque curve, despite it's over-square bore and stroke. The weight is 498 lbs, wet (slightly lower than the Magna's 525 lbs), and the engine produces 61 bhp in it's 'de-tuned' configuration. It features a six speed tranny. I would have preferred a shaft drive, but I can live with a chain... but the programmed fuel injection was an absolute 'must have'.



    In short, it's about as close to my old Magna, in terms of size and weight, as I could find in the marketplace. I considered BMW, Moto Guzzi, and a few others... even Harley, which has a new 'sport bike' line that is unlike the traditional HD sort of bike... but wanted to stay away from narrow angle v-twins, preferring a smooth engine.

    I took a bit of a beating on the trade-in value of the Stateline... but since it was MY mistake in the first place, I suppose I deserve to get hosed, a bit.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  2. #2
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Dude.

    That looks better, too. Im sad for you, but happy.

    Wish you were closer. I just met a dude who does seats. He has a little deal that forms to your posterior he uses to carve the seat foam.

    Keep us updated on whether you like it.

    What ARE you doing with yourself, Mr. Retired?

    Peace,
    Robert

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post

    Keep us updated on whether you like it.
    Will do.

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    What ARE you doing with yourself, Mr. Retired?
    Not a great deal... still trying to figure out just what to do in retirement. I come to my office every morning, read the news, check in on my investments (yesterday was NOT a good day), and then think about what I'm making for dinner (I took over the cooking about two years ago, so it's my responsibility).

    Tonight, I'm thinking of making cioppino.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  4. #4
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Sounds like a lovely retirement.

    Peace,
    Robert

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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    check in on my investments (yesterday was NOT a good day)
    the fed has gone crazy
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    the fed has gone crazy
    I presume you know this because Trump told you it was true, right?
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  7. #7
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    sign me michigan rick
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    the fed has gone crazy
    <snort>
    David G
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Nice bike. Hope the check clears.

    What amenities did you add? Inquiring minds want to know!
    King Moonraiser:
    A toy is never truly happy until it is loved by a child.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    What amenities did you add? Inquiring minds want to know!
    Nothing so far, but I'll be ordering the luggage rack. That's one thing the Stateline didn't have.... not even in the aftermarket. Thankfully, it's a bolt-on, using the same anchor points as a pillion seat would use (I never carry anyone else, so the passenger seat isn't needed).

    I had added a Memphis Shades windshield to the Stateline, but I think I'll wait and see about adding one to this bike... not sure it's all that necessary.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  11. #11
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Good for you. Seems like it can be a challenge to find the bike that is just right, and each person is different. It sucks you had to buy one and ride it a while first to find out it wasn't the one, but test rides usually don't show you everything that is good or bad.

    I hope one day to upgrade my Triumph Sprint to a Triumph Speed Triple. I love my Sprint but the Speed does a few things a little bit different and more user friendly for me.

    Chad
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by cs View Post
    Good for you. Seems like it can be a challenge to find the bike that is just right, and each person is different. It sucks you had to buy one and ride it a while first to find out it wasn't the one, but test rides usually don't show you everything that is good or bad.
    Actually, trading in the bike for a new one wasn't my idea.... I had pretty much resigned myself to just living with the Stateline. It was SWMBO who, out of the blue, told me that I should do it. She was aware that the Stateline didn't suit my preferences. Not many wives would be that perceptive!

    Quote Originally Posted by cs View Post
    I hope one day to upgrade my Triumph Sprint to a Triumph Speed Triple. I love my Sprint but the Speed does a few things a little bit different and more user friendly for me.
    My nephew rides a Speed Triple... and loves it. He commutes to Boston on it every day. The only downside is that he seems to be going through tires at an alarming rate... but maybe that's a function of his riding style, more than the bike itself.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  13. #13
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    ...
    So, I went 'shopping' for the right sort of bike, and settled on a Kawasaki Vulcan S. It's a 'cruiser' of sorts, but not really a cruiser under the skin. The engine is a version of the well-known 650 cc 'Ninja' engine, but with a heavier flywheel, and ported and tuned for a much broader torque curve, despite it's over-square bore and stroke. The weight is 498 lbs, wet (slightly lower than the Magna's 525 lbs), and the engine produces 61 bhp in it's 'de-tuned' configuration. It features a six speed tranny. I would have preferred a shaft drive, but I can live with a chain... but the programmed fuel injection was an absolute 'must have'.



    .
    Was talking to a young guy last week - he bought one of those in early summer as his first "full size" bike - bought it day one and day two set off from Cardiff to Budapest.

    He was very pleased with the bike.
    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Was talking to a young guy last week - he bought one of those in early summer as his first "full size" bike - bought it day one and day two set off from Cardiff to Budapest.

    He was very pleased with the bike.
    I'm not sure the Vulcan is the kind of bike I'd want for THAT trip.... but, to each, his own. Not much carrying capacity, and I'm not aware of any panniers available for it.... the Vulcan 900cc series, however, does have options for saddlebags. The 900cc engine is a narrow angle V-twin, however.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  15. #15
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    My nephew rides a Speed Triple... and loves it. He commutes to Boston on it every day. The only downside is that he seems to be going through tires at an alarming rate... but maybe that's a function of his riding style, more than the bike itself.[/QUOTE]

    Dont forget the tyre compound can play a huge part. I had some super soft Avon Venoms that only lasted 1500 miles, but super sticky. I ended up with using Pirelli Phantoms as they were better, more predictable in the wet, and i could get 10,000 out of a rear and 15,000 on a front......makes a huge difference to the tyre budget if you clocking over 100,000 a year.

    Nice bike Norm. I think im close to a deal on an old 650 Honda revere, think you called it a hawk over there, but we have shaft instead of chain drive. I found riding the XL250 on the highway with the trucks up my backside a bit unerving.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    .

    Nice bike Norm. I think im close to a deal on an old 650 Honda revere, think you called it a hawk over there, but we have shaft instead of chain drive...
    Perhaps you're referring to the Honda Nighthawk, which lasted a number of years and was made in a number of different displacements... the one I'm most familiar with, which a friend owned, was a 750cc, 4 cyl vertical, air-cooled. They were good reliable bikes... but I wasn't fond of the rather peaky torque curve of that engine... one needed a lot of shifting to keep it at the peak of the power curve.

    The CB650SC (also called the Nighthawk 650) was a Hondastandardmotorcycle sold in the US from 19821985.

    In 1982 the Nighthawk replaced the Custom of the previous years and featured a re-designed tank and side covers. In 1983-1985 a new DOHC engine replaced the SOHC engine used from 1979-1982. The new engine had hydraulic valve lash adjusters and was rubber mounted. This year also saw the move from chain drive to shaft-drive for this model.


    Full specs on this motorcycle can be found at http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/mod...thawk%2082.htm
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  17. #17
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    That works. A lot.

    And yet ....



    Still says 'me!'

    Andy
    "We were schooner-rigged and rakish, with a long and lissome hull ..."

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    Actually, trading in the bike for a new one wasn't my idea.... I had pretty much resigned myself to just living with the Stateline. It was SWMBO who, out of the blue, told me that I should do it. She was aware that the Stateline didn't suit my preferences. Not many wives would be that perceptive!



    My nephew rides a Speed Triple... and loves it. He commutes to Boston on it every day. The only downside is that he seems to be going through tires at an alarming rate... but maybe that's a function of his riding style, more than the bike itself.
    Your wife suggested it? Wow. That would be like my wife saying, "Honey, why don't your build another boat?".
    Enjoy!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    Perhaps you're referring to the Honda Nighthawk, which lasted a number of years and was made in a number of different displacements... the one I'm most familiar with, which a friend owned, was a 750cc, 4 cyl vertical, air-cooled. They were good reliable bikes... but I wasn't fond of the rather peaky torque curve of that engine... one needed a lot of shifting to keep it at the peak of the power curve.
    Ah, Honda have called more than one model a Hawk....i was referring to this one...



    But Europeans got this.....




    Boringly reliable. Im not getting any younger.....

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    That NTV comes tantalisingly close to my idea of perfect.
    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    Will do.



    Not a great deal... still trying to figure out just what to do in retirement. I come to my office every morning, read the news, check in on my investments (yesterday was NOT a good day), and then think about what I'm making for dinner (I took over the cooking about two years ago, so it's my responsibility).

    Tonight, I'm thinking of making cioppino.
    Hmm, you need more than that. Retirement with no plans is not the best idea. But on cooking, ain't that a thing? My wife has gone and got herself a full time job, while I happily run a couple of part time businesses from home. So I'm taking over the cooking duties. Actual cooking is the easy part, find a recipe, anyone can do that. It's the shopping, thinking ahead about provisions for the next week or two, coming up with some regular staples everyone is happy with, and spicing it up with some variation, that's the hard part. And with 2 teenage kids still at home, who may or may not be in for any given meal, and who can clean out the fridge with a single deep breath, it's a freaking nightmare isn't it?

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Hmm, you need more than that. Retirement with no plans is not the best idea.
    Long before I 'retired', I had ideas... but by the time I got to 'retirement', none of them appealed to me, any longer. I put 'retirement' in quotes because it wasn't really voluntary... I just finished off some small projects for a client, and nothing new appeared on the horizon. If there were projects available that were suitable for me, I'd be better off working.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    But on cooking, ain't that a thing? My wife has gone and got herself a full time job, while I happily run a couple of part time businesses from home. So I'm taking over the cooking duties. Actual cooking is the easy part, find a recipe, anyone can do that. It's the shopping, thinking ahead about provisions for the next week or two, coming up with some regular staples everyone is happy with, and spicing it up with some variation, that's the hard part. And with 2 teenage kids still at home, who may or may not be in for any given meal, and who can clean out the fridge with a single deep breath, it's a freaking nightmare isn't it?
    Well, I'm only cooking for SWMBO and myself, and I don't plan a week ahead... I just drop into the nearby supermarket every afternoon, and decide what to make. Tonight, it was cioppino... so I picked up some onions, celery, garlic, a couple of cans of diced tomatoes, some parsley, and some cod, shrimp, and scallops.

    It's sometimes hard. My wife has Celiac, so that's one restriction on what I can cook. As for me, I'm doing a more or less ketogenic diet, so that's yet another restriction. Usually, it's a protein of some sort (chicken, fish, beef or pork) along with a vegetable (asparagus, broccoli, green beans, all fresh), and a potato for her (but not for me). Most of the meals are VERY healthy, if somewhat boring... but she prefers simple food, anyhow. The cioppino was a rare treat.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  23. #23
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyG View Post
    That works. A lot.

    And yet ....



    Still says 'me!'

    Andy
    I considered this bike.... VERY appealing.

    However, there's no Moto Guzzi dealer reasonably close to me.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  24. #24
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    The guzzi looks like burned shins.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Ah, Honda have called more than one model a Hawk....i was referring to this one...



    But Europeans got this.....




    Boringly reliable. Im not getting any younger.....
    All day long, please!

    Peace,
    Robert

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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    I loved my Concours, but the Seattle traffic was too much. Very comfortable.
    Have a Holly Jolly Christmas🎅

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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    Long before I 'retired', I had ideas... but by the time I got to 'retirement', none of them appealed to me, any longer. I put 'retirement' in quotes because it wasn't really voluntary... I just finished off some small projects for a client, and nothing new appeared on the horizon. If there were projects available that were suitable for me, I'd be better off working.



    Well, I'm only cooking for SWMBO and myself, and I don't plan a week ahead... I just drop into the nearby supermarket every afternoon, and decide what to make. Tonight, it was cioppino... so I picked up some onions, celery, garlic, a couple of cans of diced tomatoes, some parsley, and some cod, shrimp, and scallops.

    It's sometimes hard. My wife has Celiac, so that's one restriction on what I can cook. As for me, I'm doing a more or less ketogenic diet, so that's yet another restriction. Usually, it's a protein of some sort (chicken, fish, beef or pork) along with a vegetable (asparagus, broccoli, green beans, all fresh), and a potato for her (but not for me). Most of the meals are VERY healthy, if somewhat boring... but she prefers simple food, anyhow. The cioppino was a rare treat.
    Ahhh, meat and 3 veg. I could do that for maybe a week before there was a riot

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    Yup, I'm trading in the Honda Stateline, for a new bike.



    In short, it's about as close to my old Magna, in terms of size and weight, as I could find in the marketplace. .
    I like the look of it. Post a review here after you've had it for a while.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by Stiletto View Post
    I like the look of it. Post a review here after you've had it for a while.
    Well, I've had it for exactly 25 miles (picked it up yesterday). For a VERY short term impression, here goes:

    The 25 mile ride back from the dealer was a delight... like a heavy load had been lifted off my back... not surprising, since the Honda Stateline I traded in tips the scales at 750+ lbs, while the Vulcan S is 498 lbs, wet.

    Seriously, the handling was light and very responsive... comfortable in the turns, as I had expected. While the manual recommends a 'break in' schedule, including limiting revs to 4,000 RPM for the first few hundred miles, there was still quite surprising acceleration, even with that limitation. The six speed transmission shifted smoothly, although the downshift to first gear seems like a long throw... but it's not something worthy of complaint.

    The seating position was nearly perfect, except for the height of the handlebars, which seems to put the grips about 2-3 inches higher than I'd like... but it wasn't all that objectionable. This bike features something Kawasaki calls 'Ergo-Fit', which is the ability to adjust seating position, leg extension, and handlebar reach, for three different heights of rider; as delivered, it was set for the middle position, suitable for riders from 5'7" to 6'1"... I'm a bit less than 6', so it was right, for me. The seating position is 'moderate cruiser', i.e., with legs somewhat extended, but not severely, which is how I like it.

    The bike has ABS braking, although in a few attempts, I was unable to trigger it.... didn't want to overdo it, with the bike being so new.

    The 650cc vertical twin is fairly smooth, and reasonably quiet, which is what I was looking for. The instrument cluster contains an 'analog' tachometer, and a digital panel for speed, fuel level, odometer, trip odometer, and even a full set of fuel consumption stats, like MPG estimate, range, instantaneous fuel consumption, and so on... stuff which strikes me as pretty ridiculous, on a bike... but it's easy to ignore, and the digits for that stuff are small and hard to read while riding, anyhow. The panel also contains a numerical gear indicator... something which eventually, I'll probably ignore... but was useful yesterday, in figuring out appropriate shift points, especially since I want to keep the RPM down during break-in.

    The idle was set too low.... after reading the manual, I realized it. Fortunately, there's an easily reached idle adjustment knob, so I'll be able to bring it up from 1,000 RPM, to the factory spec 1,250-1,350 RPM. It idled smoothly, but it was definitely too low.

    So, for the 25 mile instant impression:

    PROS: light, responsive handling... smooth, quiet engine... comfortable seating position... very close to exactly what I want in a bike, with respect to power, comfort, quietness, weight

    CONS: handlebar height seems a few inches too high... downshifting into first at a light feels a bit 'mushy'... idle set too low
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  30. #30
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Sounds like a win

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    The guzzi looks like burned shins.
    Not in my experience with them - lovely warm gloves when stopped at traffic lights though!

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    It's all about choices

    HipstamaticPhoto-560726538.587987.jpg

    I'm partial to Italians
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Thanks Norman. You will probably be able to have some other handlebars fitted without too much difficulty.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    I dont recall the term used, but do the pistons in that twin travel together,on the same stroke, ie, both hit top dead centre at the same time? I am not sure if it was Honda who first used this on some twins in the 70s, but others have used it since, seems to save having balancer weights put in, apparently.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Changing motorcycles again

    Edward Turner did that with the speed twin in 1937 the vibratory results are all too well known.
    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

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