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Thread: Plywood Repairs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    West Chicago, IL, Dupage
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    Default Plywood Repairs

    Have a 14 plywood sloop with a leak in the transom and possible along dagger board tunnel, see pictures (tunnel and upside transom). Need advice on how to fix. Previous owner used what looks like epoxy. Im use to kayaks and composite hulls; plywood is all new to me. Can someone steer me in right right direction?
    5D23C82A-061E-4F8B-9E81-E53AE2BFDED0.jpg ABC02C55-4FFB-4F0B-A104-30FDAE568744.jpg

    Thanks,
    Phil

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Lakebay, WA
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    looks like may need a new transom.....
    remove paint to see what is going on there
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
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  3. #3
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    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    New transom is easier than repairs, cut a little oversize unless you are a better woodworker than me, and don't presume that it's absolutely symmetrical. I am refurbishing a 1961 sailing dinghy that is from the look of that, in better nick. I'd have a careful look at the framing in the area, and get rid of the paint if you can. There might be some ugly stuff under those patchings as it's an area where water is inclined to pool. I replaced the whole transom and rear deck framing as it was easier than a repair. It's a plank bottom I see? A new transom and framing will enable you to get a good look at the plank ends as well.

    I'm no expert I might add, it's just that I'm doing the same repair as you more or less.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2018
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    West Chicago, IL, Dupage
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    Quote Originally Posted by 2dogsnight View Post
    looks like may need a new transom.....
    remove paint to see what is going on there
    When I remove the blue paint (assuming you mean on the lower mount for the tiller), what should I be looking for? I can see that there has been some fill work done there. If the transom needs to be replaced, do I need to remove the screws on the transom or might I suspect there is there some additional added as well? After that do I cut a new piece of plywood a bit over size, seal and attach then trim to size. Any recommendations on special type/grade of plywood and sealant?

    thanks,
    Phil

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    As above, don't be timid. Just start chopping away at anything that's suspect. The bottom planking next to the transom needs to be examined, too. Tapping the wood with a plastic mallet and poking at it with an awl is also telling. If the mallet lands with a thud or the awl sinks in, you have wood that needs to come out.

    You want marine grade plywood if you can find it. I don't know what sources are available in your area.
    -Dave

  6. #6
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    Oct 2018
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    West Chicago, IL, Dupage
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    Wouls a picture of the inside help? I did notice a small soft spot (size of dime) in center rear of the cockpit where the transom attached to rest of hull. If the transom needs to be replaced, do I need to remove the screws on the transom or might I suspect there is there some additional added as well?

    After that do I cut a new piece of plywood a bit over size, seal and attach then trim to size. Any recommendations on special type/grade of plywood an d sealant?7BC9076A-B472-4806-8552-6C8E8C015AD9.jpg

    thanks,
    Phil

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    I think one step at a time.
    Everything seems hidden under paint, old varnish and goop. Start sanding/grinding/scraping that back to the wood so you can have a close look.
    It's probably worth doing this in any case so you can paint/varnish it back up properly - it won't be a wasted effort.
    Philip K. Dick 'Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away'.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    West Chicago, IL, Dupage
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    Will be a State XC meet this weekend but will work on the transom in this area this coming week and post what I find-thank you.

  9. #9
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    Oct 2018
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    Here’s a picture of the sanded transom. Wood looks good except for some delamination and a rough spot or two. Can I use CPES to penetrate then epoxy fill to fix? Or do you have further suggestions.
    C6ADA35A-B2C9-4C4B-A6CB-37DC60388F67.jpg

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Plywood Repairs

    I'm not sure that ply looks all that good. Is it delaminating?

    My thoughts without seeing the inside sanded back;

    Sand back the inside of the hull, to about 6 inches out from the transom.
    Sand back the outside of the hull about a foot back.
    Sand all transom inside and out, and anything attached to it (pic #1)
    And hour or so of work.

    Fill those cracks with thickened epoxy.
    Create a fillet of thickened epoxy around the inside join of the transom/hull - and if you're feeling keen, glass tape over that.
    Sand smooth-ish once set.

    Optional - run a small sheet of fiber glass on the underside of the hull where sanded, epoxied on. Add a couple of layers of epoxy as it goes off.
    Coat everything you've sanded in epoxy - twice.
    (Basically make an epoxy glove for the whole aft section about 6" to 12" from the transom).

    Paint.


    Small touches of epoxy won't last long. The timber will expand and contract and shake the epoxy off reasonably quickly.
    Philip K. Dick 'Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away'.

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