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Thread: Sooty Tern No. 93

  1. #141
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    I had about 40 plywood planking clamps, but I daresay more is better. I put a temporary screw through the lap at each mould and clamps between.
    Ian
    Hello Ian,

    You got the jump on me between posts, too! Thank you for your advice - I’ll start cutting ‘em up and see where I end up. Probably with 80+ clamps if I use the wider last strip too. The latter would be good for plank holders per your Kotik thread.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  2. #142
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hi Alex,
    I can't remember if you're doing the lofting just for the exercise of doing it (and of course learning lots about the boat you're building in the process) or because it's necessary for the Sooty Tern.

    My Whilly Boat plans came with full-sized patterns for the stems and the molds. The molds were faceted for the planks, so spiling was easy. No lining off needed.

    Is the Sooty just a stretched Arctic Tern or are there other differences too?

    I ask because while I would definitely enjoy learning to loft, I could also see it being a block of sorts, whereas with the actual parts in front of me, things are apt to make more sense.

    Do you have your plans yet? That's an exciting day!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  3. #143
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Mike,

    I bought the plans for No.93 three years ago for Stray Dog Boatworks in Adelaide, South Australia (well, Mt Barker, Sth Aust.). And yes, it was an exciting day when the plans arrived in the post! I did a lot of reading of various ST builds here on WBF, and have discussed a number of things with Mr Oughtred over the last three years. I am only now in a position where I can think about starting to build the thing - I still have the workshop to complete, and having built a (small) boat in cramped, damp and dangerously cluttered conditions, I’m never doing that again. So nothing apart from the lofting actually gets started until the workspace is ready. I am getting closer to that day, though.

    As to lofting, it probably isn’t strictly necessary for the Sooty moulds, but it is ESSENTIAL for the stems, which are quite different from those of the Arctic. A separate set of offsets for the stems is supplied on the Sooty Lines Plan. I am, however, lofting the moulds (twice) for the experience hand practise), as that’s the way that my mind ticks (i.e., I do everything the hard way!). I won’t be faceting the moulds before cutting out, per advice from Ian Milne and Alex Zimm, which also means that I will need to find - and cut - some decent batten material.

    As to the ST vs the AT, my understanding is that James McMullen did more or less stretch the AT LOA, but you would reaaly need to ask him directly. There are refinements that I believe Ian added to James' initial work. There is also the matter of the 'Jeannie II', or 'J2', which, I think, sits in between the Arctic and the Sooty Terns, but that is really just speculation on my part: I don’t really know. Others such as Ian (as well as James) will no doubt know.

    I’m not sure if I’ve answered your questions, or made any sense, but I have typed far too long on the iPad* for one evening!

    Cheers,
    Alex.

    * Note to self: really, REALLY stop trying to make forum posts on the iPad! Aaaargh!
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-10-2019 at 07:36 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  4. #144
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by pvg View Post
    Sure looks like you're well equipped to "dabble around" in boat-building; and boats love the attention to detail you seem to be willing to put in. But you'd better be careful, the damn things have a way of becoming a compulsion... ;-)
    Looking forward to the construction!
    pvg
    Hello pvg,

    My apologies for leaving replying to your post until now - I kept meaning to reply, then getting distracted. Anyway, I am replying now.

    I am certainly better equipped for boatbuilding both in terms of technique and tools than when I built the ‘Duck but that was a very simple craft. This one is a different bucket of snakes entirely. One thing though, as I said to Mike above, I am determined to be much better organised.

    Speaking of getting organised, I remembered that I had a small Bluetooth keyboard lying about, bought specifically for use with the iPad. I’m not sure why I have been overlooking that, but it makes typing text in iPad text files SO much easier. There are even working cursor and ctrl/alt/cmd keys. And less typing errors. Hooray!

    This is my first real use of this little gem, and also my first - but definitely not my last - post with it.

    I have some updates, but they will have to wait for another day - soon, though.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-10-2019 at 07:37 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  5. #145
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Things are proceeding slowly but surely. I have been working mostly on the toolboard - which has become two toolboards - and working away at preparing the area that the main board will go up on. I have also been playing about with a newly-acquired chalk-line.

    1. Razor plane’s sole and blade: as used to trim off paint runs from the lofting boards' edges - possibly a bit too enthusiastically.


    Razor plane’s blade by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Upper part of razor plane.


    Razor plane’s top by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Chalk-line from the device-end. The resultant line reveals that the floor has many dips and hollows. The two slab sections are at different heights, too, which I already knew. I have a strategy already planned for getting the frame straight and level. I wasn't terribly pleased with the dark blue of the line, I have to say.


    Chalk-line from the device-end by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. I changed to yellow chalk - strangely, white doesn't seem to be available in my neck of the woods, at least. The mould stations and beam half-offsets on the port side have been marked in - the bow, of course is at the far end. You might have to view the image at a larger size to see them, but in real life they really stood out. The stations and offsets were taken directly from the Sooty Tern Lines plan, and I added the extra 1/2” between each station this time to make the LOA up to 20’ (6.10 m). An early iteration of the toolboard can be see to the right, but it didn't stay like that for long.


    Mould stations and beam offsets marked by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Meanwhile, back home: marking the lofting verticals in - in ink. This is best done when you know that your lines are going to be correct. A bit of a Heath Robinson setup, but I wanted a continuous edge the move the straight-edge along...


    Marking the lofting verticals in - in ink by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. I blithely drew in all five verticals, thinking that I had everthing strapped down. Were they accurate? Hah! I think that one out of the five was close, and that was more by good luck than good management. Despite carefully and repeatedly checking that the T-square was square to the board’s lower edge, and that the aluminium billet was hard up against it, and the straight-edge likewise against the billet, either somethimg was out, or something must have shifted at some point. I got a cloth and some water and rubbed all the lines out. Even more annoyingly, the same thing happened AGAIN this evening, without the billet. The board at this point is flat.


    Were they accurate? Hah! by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I have been giving this some considerable though over the week or two since I did the lines set on the moulds lofting board. As a result, the approach has been revised, and I have acquired a German-made carpenter's square (and a new set of engineer's squares with a good set of specifications, in a not-wooden case). The bottom edge of the board appears to be slightly curved inwards, which was no doubt contributing to the problems. This may have been a result of the paint planing. Anyway, my new approach will become clear in due course.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-11-2019 at 02:41 AM. Reason: Lots of tpsoy fidex
    You can never have too many clamps

  6. #146
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Back to the drawing board, ha ha.

    1. Possible source of problems with perpendicularity: iIt looks as though the bottom edge of the board has in inward curve to it: enough to throw the T-square out.


    Possible source of problems with perpendicularity by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Closer-up view of (part of) curve in plywood sheet edge.


    Closer-up view of curve in plywood sheet edge by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. I had some feathery visitors at Wentworth Falls the other day: a family of wood ducks (actually a small species of gooe) waddled up to say "Hello". These are the birds after which my previous boat is named. Some of the goslings - and Dad, I think - can be seen here (there were seven plus Mum and Dad, all told).


    I had some feathery visitors today by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. A more recent toolboard arrangement. This is just about it: I made a few minor adjustments after I took this, but nothing major was changed.


    Latest toolboard arrangement by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. You might be wondering why there is a large piece of empy board at the bottom. Because of the overall arrangement of the workspoace - there are two large cupboards of my father-in-law's that I can't abolish - the area below the pencil marks will be covered by a bench, for most of the width of the board.


    The area below the pencil lines will be covered by a bench by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Another toolboard on the way. This one is half the width of the first one, and is seen here at a very early stage. It will go behind the wood lathe.


    Another toolboard on the way by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    There are, of course, some more photos (and commentary) lurking about, but that's enough for the present.

    Oh, and I haven't forgotten that I'm supposed to be building a boat, but first things first.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  7. #147
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    [QUOTE=Alex1N;5778249] "Hello Mike, ....
    As to lofting, it probably isn’t strictly necessary for the Sooty moulds, but it is ESSENTIAL for the stems, which are quite different from those of the Arctic. A separate set of offsets for the stems is supplied on the Sooty Lines Plan. I am, however, lofting the moulds (twice) for the experience hand practise), as that’s the way that my mind ticks (i.e., I do everything the hard way!). I won’t be faceting the moulds before cutting out, per advice from Ian Milne and Alex Zimm, which also means that I will need to find - and cut - some decent batten material.
    As to the ST vs the AT, my understanding is that James McMullen did more or less stretch the AT LOA, but you would reaaly need to ask him directly. There are refinements that I believe Ian added to James' initial work. There is also the matter of the 'Jeannie II', or 'J2', which, I think, sits in between the Arctic and the Sooty Terns, but that is really just speculation on my part: I don’t really know. Others such as Ian (as well as James) will no doubt know. "

    Hi Alex, and Mike,
    I see my name mentioned. No, you don't have to loft the Sooty Tern design, but you can if you want to, or as much of it as you want to, like I did, just as you can loft any of Iain's designs, or not. It's a good learning experience. James did stretch the Arctic Tern design, and I expect he increased the station spacings by equal percentages, giving slightly more rake in the stems. As you say, Iain gives offsets for the stem profiles. You do have to draw ("loft") those. Iain's full-sized mould patterns for the Arctic Tern also fit the Sooty Tern, but for the ST Iain made small additions to the sheer height at each mould, as just stretching the existing design would have the visual effect of flattening the sheer. The design was named Sooty Tern after Iain had redrawn it.
    My 1998 edition of Iain's design catalogue shows his range of Shetland-style boats as the Whilly Boat at 14' 6" x 4' 7 1/2", the Ness Boat at 16' 6" x 5' 2", the Ness Yawl at 19' 2" x 5' 3"and the Caledonia Yawl at 19' 6" x 6' 2". A note on the Ness Yawl page says,"95% version now available:- 18' 1" x 5' 2". The Arctic Tern page from the current catalogue says, "... this elegant little vessel began as a 95% scaled-down Ness Yawl." Now, according to Nic Compton's book, "Iain Oughtred, A Life in Wooden Boats", this first scaled down Ness Yawl was the Jeanie II. This design became the Arctic Tern (18' 2" x 5' 4 1/2"). The book has a detailed description of the development of Iain's designs.

    Good to see you getting organised, Alex. That's a fine array of hand-tools. Nice photo of the wood-ducks, too.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #148
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Ian,

    Thank you very much for the time-line of the Oughtred Shetland Yawls - that sorts out where Jeannie II fits in very nicely. One of my wife's aunt's friends brought around the Compton book for me to have a look at when I was in Sandbank on the Holy Loch a couple of years ago, but we unfortunately didn't have the time there for me to do it justice.

    And thank you for your kind words about the organising, etc. There is quite a bit more to do, but I am also working on the lofting process again, see below.

    1. A new carpenter’s square, and a new set of engineer’s squares.


    New set of engineer’s squares - and a carpenter’s square by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Engineer’s squares - 2”, 4” and 6” set. Non-water-absorbing (or releasing) case, with anti-tarnish strips. Not being in a wooden case is really important for me: I have had all my previous steel squares rust when left in their cases, to the point that I left them out and at the mercy of various knocks, bumps and accidents. The anti-tarnish cover paper and strips underneath the squares are a real bonus, too.


    Engineer’s squares - 2”, 4” and 6” set by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Next set-up for drawing lofting verticals: boards up on blocks to allow clamping of the long aluminium bar ‘straight-edge’. It's not quite Mr Milne's use of a building frame table, but perhaps it is a little bit better than nothing.


    Next set-up for drawing lofting verticals by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Bar clamped to prevent it wandering about the place. It has been offset over the edge of the board to produce a baseline at about 50 mm/2” from the edge of the sheet. Verticals and waterlines will be struck from this straight reference edge.


    Bar clamped to prevent it wandering about the place by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. A recent (pre-baseline bar) vertical appears to be out. This in itself doesn't mean anything, since the baseline probably has little parallelism with the sheet's bottom edge, over the width of the sheet. The new carpenter’s square is sitting against the aluminium reference bar; the bar won’t be removed until the lofting grid - verticals and waterlines - is completed.


    A recent (pre-baseline) vertical appears to be out by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Fully-populated second toolboard: some measuring tools plus the Nova chuck for the lathe added. I have also run a rough pencil line around each item, before removing the tools to put the pegboard up on the wall. I will add the final filled-in outlines once the board is up - the same for the first toolboard, of course. I also have all these photos as references, too..


    Fully-populated second toolboard by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    After finally completing a gardening task that I have been avoiding for around three years or so, I decided that I would stay at home rather than slog up to Wentworth Falls today. I contented my self by sticking the finger-clamp-strip cutting-frame LVLs under the lofting board(s) and clamping the straight-edge to the board. I will draw in the grid - ultra-carefully - when the weather has cooled down a bit. It's heading for 42℃ again shortly, so the window is rather narrow. The shed at home gets really hot.

    I am also working on another little sub-project, which is to put wheels on a small table so that I can trundle the thicknesser about on it. More on that a little later, perhaps.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-12-2019 at 02:57 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  9. #149
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Wow! 42 degrees C. You'll need slow hardener in that!
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #150
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Well, I'll see if I can try to set the record straight about this J-II/Arctic/Sooty thing, though I'm a pretty unreliable witness. For me it all started with my old Ness Yawl Dragonfly, which I loved for performance, but didn't think was pretty enough. I later built another Ness Yawl variation, an umiak skin-on-frame boat using substantially the same sections as the Ness Yawl. That boat Angyapik was also a great performing boat, but was a little too minimalist in terms of furniture and stowage to meet my long term satisfaction. When I built Rowan, I again wanted something very much of a muchness with the Ness Yawl in size and shape, but with more strakes to approximate a more rounded hullform, both for looks and for hydrodynamic sophistication.

    By then, Iain had built Jeanie II with the six-strake sides and narrower section. I wrote to him for plans, and he suggested a somewhat fuller section he was working out for a more cruising oriented version of the J-II--which I then stretched out to the length of the Ness Yawl using a spacing confirmed by Iain. I wanted the extra length for stowage for the longer and more involved touring I enjoy. I had already built at least forty boats by then, so I was pretty comfortable with lofting these changes on the fly, including the stems, and fairing the final line-off right on the molds. As I recall, I had to tweak the sheer again after the roll over, but I had expected this and had left it fat.

    This boat turned out to be a success, and I soon realized that I'd never had a boat that suited me better. I've added some tweaks and customization to personalize the details that I prefer, and now all these many years later it's the only boat I've built out of five dozen that I'd do all over again, exactly the same.

    The Sooty Tern plans that Iain drew a bit later are based off of the Arctic Tern plans that are the wider, more cruising- oriented version of the J-II. They are very much the same as Rowan, with perhaps some minor details to sort out.

    Still satisfied. Best boat I ever built.


  11. #151
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Wow! 42 degrees C. You'll need slow hardener in that!
    Ian
    Hello Ian,

    Yes indeed! It's going to be a warm week! Luckily, I haven't planned on doing any boat-related epoxy work . It'll be a good time to do fast-setting epoxy work on the cockatoo-mauled doors, though!

    Here's the temperature forecast for the next seven days:


    A warm week ahead by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Well, I'll see if I can try to set the record straight about this J-II/Arctic/Sooty thing, though I'm a pretty unreliable witness. For me it all started with my old Ness Yawl Dragonfly, which I loved for performance, but didn't think was pretty enough. I later built another Ness Yawl variation, an umiak skin-on-frame boat using substantially the same sections as the Ness Yawl. That boat Angyapik was also a great performing boat, but was a little too minimalist in terms of furniture and stowage to meet my long term satisfaction. When I built Rowan, I again wanted something very much of a muchness with the Ness Yawl in size and shape, but with more strakes to approximate a more rounded hullform, both for looks and for hydrodynamic sophistication.

    By then, Iain had built Jeanie II with the six-strake sides and narrower section. I wrote to him for plans, and he suggested a somewhat fuller section he was working out for a more cruising oriented version of the J-II--which I then stretched out to the length of the Ness Yawl using a spacing confirmed by Iain. I wanted the extra length for stowage for the longer and more involved touring I enjoy. I had already built at least forty boats by then, so I was pretty comfortable with lofting these changes on the fly, including the stems, and fairing the final line-off right on the molds. As I recall, I had to tweak the sheer again after the roll over, but I had expected this and had left it fat.

    This boat turned out to be a success, and I soon realized that I'd never had a boat that suited me better. I've added some tweaks and customization to personalize the details that I prefer, and now all these many years later it's the only boat I've built out of five dozen that I'd do all over again, exactly the same.

    The Sooty Tern plans that Iain drew a bit later are based off of the Arctic Tern plans that are the wider, more cruising- oriented version of the J-II. They are very much the same as Rowan, with perhaps some minor details to sort out.

    Still satisfied. Best boat I ever built.
    Hello James,

    Thank you very much for the details of the Sooty's pedigree, and for the great picture! Great to hear of your continuing high opinion of the boat.

    I have made a little bit of progress towards starting, which will appear in the next post.

    Cheers,
    Alex,
    You can never have too many clamps

  12. #152
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I have reached a milestone with the first of the pegboards.

    1. Main toolboard site - note the severely-pruned shelving unit. I cleared the stuff from under the bench and moved the bench and shelves out of the way so that I could work on the wall unimpeded.


    Main toolboard site - note the severely-pruned shelving unit by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. First pegboard batten in place.


    First pegboard batten in place by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Closeup of batten showing notch filed to avoid the fibreboard connector.


    Closeup of batten showing notch filed to avoid the fibreboard connector by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Filed notch in batten no. 3: 10 mm round wood rasp used - on all five battens.


    Filed notch in batten by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Four more battens cut to length, notches filed and screws added using the second screwed batten as a template (more or less).


    Screws added using the second screwed batten as a template by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Fibreboard pre-drilled for screws. The 'treated pine' wood screws objected to the tough fibreboard (not asbestos, by the way!) as well as the painted radiata battens.


    Fibreboard pre-drilled for screws by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    More in a little bit, I have some other stuff to attend to, suddenly.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-14-2019 at 12:12 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  13. #153
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    You're certain that's fibreboard right?

  14. #154
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Shifu, yes: it has the layered texture of fibreboard instead of the old asbestos sheet's random orientation, and is much softer than asbestos sheet, despite the lack of 'This is not Asbestos' printed all over it.

    1. I should have been pre-drilled: the paint hid the grain. I'm not happy about this, but it's probably structurally OK (I may put another screw in) and it will be hidden in any case. I will have to avoid this spot with the pegboard-fastening screws. At least it's the only bit that split like this.


    Should have been pre-drilled by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Five battens in place.


    Five battens in place by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Pegboard parts lined up


    Pegboard parts lined up by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Pegboards temporarily in place, held up with a few silicon bronze ring-nails that were conveniently to hand. The screws refused to bite into the paint on the battens, and I really need an extra arm or two. The boards will be adjusted to fit snugly up against the lower edge of the mezzanine support above - with some help!


    Pegboards temporarily in place by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. The tools were, of course, removed from the pegboard before putting it up, more or less in the array-order that they were on the board. I ran pencil lines around the tools when they were still on the board, but a little extra order doesn't hurt.


    Tools were removed from pegboard before putting it up by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Faintly-pencilled tool outlines. You may have to squint to see these - 'faintly' is the operative word. These rough sketches will be redrawn properly after the boards are up and I have the final pegged hanging positions of the tools, and will then fill in the outlines in gloss black enamel paint.


    Faintly-pencilled tool outlines by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Well, I was going to show the thicknesser-table idea, but in my enthusiasm the pegboard distracted me somewhat. The toolboards are, for me, a ground-breaking innovation, since, as I have said, I have never had my tools nearly as well organised as this. Drawers really just don't cut it, as it were.
    You can never have too many clamps

  15. #155
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    OK, the 'thicknesser table':

    1. To support the relatively heavy machine - heavy for this structure at any rate - and be reasonably useful, it will have four castors added, plus a new top, and be beefed up with some 19 mm (3/4”) meranti diagonals (when I have been able to dig the meranti out of the wood heap). You may wonder why I just didn't make a new table from scratch...


    Table about to have castors added by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. I'm going to use this item, which appears to be made from Australian white cypress (Callitris spp., I think) as a new, somewhat stronger table top.


    Tabletop to be replaced with this one by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Four castors with brakes. These are good quality units, which should cope with trundling the thicknesser about.


    Four castors with brakes by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Close-up of castor.


    Close-up of castor by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. 'Castor attachment unit’, a piece of form-ply from my concreting works in the Workswamp back in Wahroonga. Waste not, want not. It will be cleaned up before cutting to size and rounding off the corners.


    'Castor attachment unit’ by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. The table minus its top. The old top can be seen pining away in the background.


    Table minus its top by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    That's about as far as I've got with this little project: the toolboards were a higher priority as they were lying about on the workshop floor. The thicknesser is lying about on the workshop floor now, of course, having been evicted from the larger table which I had to move to put the first pegboard(s) up. The thicknesser is also much less in the way (of the returning painters, who started again this morning), where I put it.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-14-2019 at 12:28 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  16. #156
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    That is a hell of a workshop Mate :-)
    Good to see you back at the drawing board. I like your approach with the aluminium bar.
    Max

  17. #157
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    200

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Max,

    Thank you very much for your kind comments. The aluminium bar and its twin are very useful, although neither has been used for what I bought them (one bar cut in half to fit in the car!) for, which was a small piece to use as a heat sink for CNC stepper motor drivers. One day...

    I got the main pegboard(s) installed yesterday, but first, a snaps of the 'new' 'thicknesser table':

    1. New top resting on table. I will need to make rebates in the top of the table frame, shorten the legs, and also brace three sides to beef it upo. While a small unit, the thicknesser is quire heavy, and the whole item is going to be moved about.


    New top resting on table by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Clamp-overflow storage. Well, only 'overflow' because I have used up all the available spots. I can either put this up somewhere or leave it as it is and move it about as necessary. The clamps usually live in drawers when at home. I have since added some black and yellow clamps.


    Clamp-overflow storage by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. First toolboard installed on its battens. There are quite a few screws (62) holding the two panels up.


    First toolboard installed on battens by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. First cluster of tools added to the board


    First cluster of tools added to the board by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Close-up of saw and outline, the saw having been shifted a few holes to the left.


    Close-up of saw and outline by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Clamps and marking tools closer-up. The clamps have shifted a hole or so to the left from the original positions - which is why the original outlines were faint.


    Clamps and marking tools closer-up by Alex1N, on Flickr.

    The next couple of days are going to be very low-key as the heat really begins to bite. I'm also back on call for the Rural Fire Service, so any activity on that front will see none here.


    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-16-2019 at 06:22 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

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