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Thread: Sooty Tern No. 93

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    OK. New page, which is a bit of a relief.

    1. Fore and aft perpendiculars, and Stations 1, 2, 6 and 7 marked in, with fore and aft sheer points


    Fore and aft perpendiculars, and Stations 1, 2, 6 and 7 marked in, with fore and aft sheer points by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. First forward stem line battened. This the middle line: the front of the apron and the rear of the actual stem. I am not convinced that it’s quite right...


    First forward stem line battened by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Drawn stem line - the one that delineates the apron and actual stem. Other elements drawn in before lofting included the vertical positions of the aft mast step, and the forward face of the mast box, both relative to the Station 2 perpendicular. The latter is at its new position, one inch aft of where it is indicated on the Sooty Tern lines plan (this also takes into account the extra half inch for forward perpendicular to Station 1 bay). This, along with an extra half inch at each of the other six stations, gives an exact 20’ distance between forward and aft perpendiculars, per an option given by Mr Oughtred on the Sooty sail plan sheet.


    Drawn stem line - the one that delineates the apron and actual stem by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. All three forward stem lines drawn in - but with the forward one rubbed out. The forward line was, on close inspection, out of position and a right mess in any case. The only line that is as close as I would like it is the last one drawn - the aft apron line. This cuts through all points on the curve as measure really carefully from the exact (and correct) points of the forward apron curve. The forward apron line, however, isn’t right yet.


    All three forward stem lines drawn in - but the forward one rubbed out by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Forward stem line redrawn. I also used a harder pencil (HB as opposed to 3B as used previously) to try and get a clearer, cleaner line. All points for this line were re-measured and re-positioned where necessary, before lofting the line again. It was rather hot in the shed when I did the first two lines, and that was contrbutory to my carelessness - to some extent at least.


    Forward stem line redrawn by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    That's the photos up to date. I rubbed out the middle line before doing the last couple of posts, and will get back to it now. Which includes a careful re-measuring of the points.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-04-2018 at 09:58 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  2. #107
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    The inner apron line - when laminating the stems - is the most one important since it is the one (usually) from where the rest of the structures are built up. I found that when redrawing the inner stem line, that both it and the inner apron line were severely out in spots, so I went back and checked the inner stem line for the problem.

    1. Here's the aft stem/apron lofting, apparently complete:


    Aft stem/apron lofting complete by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Upper portion of the outer stem line needs some attention. The board is unfortunately cupped badly at that end, which created gaps under the batten, under which then pencil slid, and also aloowed the batten to wobble and deflect. This was the first line drawn, so I hadn’t learnt to deal with it. The inner two lines are fine. Note that the aft keel is a lot lower than the forward part: a check of the Lines plan shows that the forward part of the keel keeps going in a longer, shallower descent whereas the aft keel’s descent is shorter and steeper.


    Overview of the almost-completed stem loftings by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I went looking for suitably weighty things to hold the board edges down after unscrewing them...

    3. Leaf-tailed gecko, sheltering inside a Besser block - until I took the lid off!


    Leaf-tailed gecko by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. A pair of Wobbly Weight Towers™ - and a flatter board. Quite a lot better, but still a bit of a high sport on the RH side. And the weight towers weren't at all wobbly this time (as opposed to the real thing during the 'Duck build, oh dear oh dear).


    A pair of Wobbly Weight Towers™ - and a flatter board by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Cluster of screws to get the board flatter at this spot. This made a slight difference, but nothing substantial. The board was flat enough to allow a nice smooth sharp-edged curve, anyway.


    Cluster of screws to get the board flatter at this spot by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. The actual problem, closer up: the inner two lines have pronounced flat spots. Oops. Better to find it out now than later, however. The nice smooth curve of the stem outer line threw the inner ones into sharp relief.


    Slight problem - inner two lines have pronounced flat spots by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    It appears that when I shifted an incorrect 8"-waterline outer stem offset, I forgot to fix the inner offset at the same time, then forgot about the whole thing - hence the inner stem line (and therefore the inner apron line) being in the wrong spot(s).

    I will deal with the unfortunately-moved inner points on the 12" waterline tomorrow, since I have a rehearsal this evening and have to head off now.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-05-2018 at 07:55 AM. Reason: Stupid forum Bowdleriser
    You can never have too many clamps

  3. #108
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hey Alex
    Cute little bastard that gecko!
    Considering the wharped plywood you have to deal with , have you thought about using particle board or osb (is it called that way in english?) for the molds?
    Easy to get, cheap, straight and ok to work on.
    Max

  4. #109
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Max,

    Yes, the gecko was even cuter in real life!

    OSB is incredibly hard to find here, and is mostly 6 mm width, for heavens’ sake. It’s ridiculous. Chipboard (particle board) is easier to obtain. I had intended to use 19 mm pine shelving for the moulds after finding - fortunately, because of the warpage - that the plywood sheets were too small to get more than one of the larger moulds out of a sheet. Have a look back on page 2, I think. Or page 1.

    Two of the three sheets of plywood that I had originally intended for the moulds was diverted into lofting boards, and the third will be cut up for finger clamps. And I have been having my doubts about the warped lofting boards recently, too.

    Australia has become a weird place, where obtaining materials is concerned - it wasn’t like this 20 to 30 years ago.
    You can never have too many clamps

  5. #110
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I liked using pine 1x6 (about 18mm) for the moulds on my Oughtred Whilly Boat. It's pleasant to work, and holds nails well.

    Good luck!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  6. #111
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    EHello Mike, welcome to my Sooty thread! I read through your Willy Boat thread a couple of months ago, and found it very interesting and useful! I've got a bit of pine shelving (up to 3/4" x 9-3/4 ", 19 mm x 250 mm) that I've allocated to the moulds, so it is encouraging to read yet another vote in favour of pine boards.

    1. Problem located - incorrect inner stem line offset. This was way too much for my obsessive nature. The correct point is in place, but that was double-checked. Since the inner apron line is taken directly off the inner stem line as a tangential offset, it was, of course, wrong too.


    Problem located - incorrect inner stem line offset by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Corrected inner and outer apron lines. You can see the difference between the older and newer pieces of line quite clearly here (at least in larger versions of the photo).


    Corrected inner and outer apron lines by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. There’s always a ‘but’...this looks distinctly not fair to my eye further up towards the sheer.


    There’s always a ‘but’... by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Aft stem loftings, overview of second attempt. Not being happy with this, I rubbed out all three lines and will start again.


    Aft stem loftings, second attempt by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Attempt to suggest the improved flatness of the lofting board after driving in a whole lot of screws into the board conernes while standing on the sheets. It's a bit better.


    Attempt to show the better flatness of the lofting board by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Cat decided to come and help. What a helpful Cat. Watch out, though, Cat: your tail is perilously close to some clamps...


    Cat decided to come and help by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I will ponder this a bit further before I do anything else. Then again, it's all useful practise, even - or especially - the mistakes, as long as they are corrected.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-06-2018 at 07:03 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  7. #112
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    What Mike said. I haven't used solid timber for moulds, so far, but I'm all in favour of it.

    That yellow clamp looks very fierce!

    Keep up the good work.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #113
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Good progress.

    You've got these lines drawn already but the process goes a whole lot easier if you put a coat or two of cheap white latex paint on your lofting ply before laying down the lines. Easier to see the the lines and easier to erase and re-draw if you have to:

    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  9. #114
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Ian and Alex,

    Thank you for your kind words and advice - as I seem to keep saying. That savage clamp seems to be a cannibal, having seized another spring clamp by the tail. Beware of the clamps!

    I nearly bought a tin of ceiling paint to slap on the plywood before starting the lofting, but I was 1., lazy; 2., in indecent haste; 3., was a bit worried about the paint further cupping the sheets. Regarding no. 3, in retrospect it would have probably helped let the cupped sides of the sheets relax and flatten a bit.

    I found that the pencil lines on the raw wood are perfectly legible: much more so than as appears in the photos here. I have rather gone into ponder mode at the moment, however, after some very good off-forum advice about lofting materials and their setup from Mr Milne, and Mr Zimm's advice directly above. If something doesn't go right, I will usually undo it and start again. Here's an example from one of many such...

    I have also paused in my lofting because, >drum-roll<:

    I have a cleared and clear workspace! Hooray! Now I can really get cracking on things. Well, on yet more preliminary things I should say, like re-assembling woodworking machines, moving the bandsaw, installing its table and generally setting it up, setting up the building frame and Manning benches, etc., etc. etc.,


    Cleared and clear workspace! by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I gave the workspace's floor a quick, long-needed sweep with a broom, and will finish tidying it up and moving stuff about this arvo. Whilst pondering the lofting issues (if in fact there are any ; ). The item on the floor under the crates, in the bottom LH corner of the photo, is a 0.2 HP 1044 cf/m (max.) 1-μm air cleaner. I will hoist this up somewhere convenient for dust removal and for avoidance of head-bumping, some time soon. I had this device suspended from the old Workswamp's ceiling (joists for the floor overhead) and running more-or-less happily. It remains to be seen what the damp did to it over the long term, both from the Workswamp and from being several years hermetically sealed in a shipping container.


    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-08-2018 at 06:06 AM. Reason: Various, but all very good, reasons
    You can never have too many clamps

  10. #115
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Ah, the wide open spaces. That looks good.
    The advantage I see in painting your lofting board (with quick-drying paint) is that you can paint over the lines you want to change. I had plenty of those. It's up to you, of course.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  11. #116
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Helo Ian,

    The wide open spaces are slightly less wide and less open, since I have started re-assembling the dismantled machine tools. I went shopping today apnd bought some paint...but I am getting ahead of myself.

    1. Cleared workspace viewed from the RH doorway.


    Cleared workspace viewed from the RH doorway by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Plywood and chipboard storage area. Note the hoop pine at the top of the photo - acquired for the 'Duck and the Goat Island Skiff. I also ordered some similar Paulownia by mistake - so I used that on the 'duck. The GIS has been deferred for the time being.


    Plywood and chipboard store by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. ‘Yellow-tongue’ 19 mm flooring chipboard (particle board) - edge view. Possible candidate for moulds.


    ‘Yellow-tongue’ 19 mm flooring chipboard (particle board) - edge view by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Various machine tool parts, awaiting their companions for reassembly. The cardboard box leaning up agains the RH middle mezzanine post is the very heavy cast iron table for the bandsaw. I ran the air filter for an hour or so to get it used to being awake again.


    Various machine tool parts, awaiting their companions for reassembly by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. A lot of tidying and sorting still to be done, part one.


    A lot of tidying and sorting still to be done, part one by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. A lot of tidying and sorting still to be done, part two. The cardboard box on the table, at least, contains the deluxe table fence for the bandsaw, so that will be dealt with fairly expeditiously - once the saw is on its little trolley (not the little trolly seen here). I'm intending to put up some pegboard behind the table, to hang up various tools. And deal with those protuberant nails!


    A lot of tidying and sorting still to be done, part two by Alex1N, on Flickr.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-10-2018 at 02:22 AM. Reason: Changed the last three photos to the correct order
    You can never have too many clamps

  12. #117
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    OK, there are the plane snaps again - I removed them from the post above since they were out of order.

    1. Bullnose plane box end aus Deutschland


    Bullnose plane box end by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. 9.7 x 2.7 cm bullnose plane, acquired from www.mytoolstore.com.au, recently. The blade is currently tucked up well up out of the way of the (albeit cardboard) box lid - and other things. I was always taught to leave planes on their sides when not in use - and I still do. We really had it hammered into us.


    9.7 x 2.7 cm bullnose plane by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Bullnose plane’s sole plate - Plane back on its side. It's is also very cute. And it *is* very sharp. This is intended to be used for cutting the plank gains.


    Bullnose plane’s sole plate by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Setting the Triton over to ‘crosscut’ mode - the table is removed and replace lower in the frame, one a pair of end supports which can be st at the desired height(s).


    Setting up the Triton for ‘crosscut’ mode by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Saw and chassis in crosscut mode. The saw is slid back and forth in the top channels of the Workcentre 2000 in this mode - in tablesaw mode the chassis is locked in place (and the other way up).


    Saw and chassis in crosscut mode by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Work fence added - it helps keeps the work square to the blade. Also prevents the saw from eating the centre slot at table's end. It can eat the fence instead...


    Work fence added by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    More anon.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-10-2018 at 02:35 AM. Reason: Kericktign tpyso nad splleing
    You can never have too many clamps

  13. #118
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    But wait, there's more (photos)...

    1. Crosscut mode table height adjusters, these adjusters are at both ends of the Triton. I still need to check that the saw blade is at 90° to the table and adjust if necessary.


    Crosscut mode table height adjusters by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Heavy duty mobile base, next to the bandsaw - the latter will end up on the base so that it can be wheeled about conveniently.


    Heavy duty mobile base by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Starting to re-assemble the 10” tablesaw: the trunnion assembly had come adrift from the blocks that it slides between. It took a lot of fiddling and jiggling to refit it properly.


    Re-assembling the 10” tablesaw by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Saw cabinet placed on two 2x4 LVLs and the table insert inserted. I previously had it resting on an old blanket to prevent the table from being damaged by the hhad(er) concrete floor.


    Saw cabinet placed on two 2x4 LVLs and the table insert inserted by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Blade installed to check trunnion assembly alignment with the table.


    Blade installed to check trunnion assembly alignment by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. This the blade with the large patch - blob - of rust on one side. I also tested the operation of the trunnipon unit to see if there was any blade-binding with bits of the trunnuin itself, ot the table insert. It seemed OK, even without the trunnion fastening bolts tightened up.


    This the blade with the large patch of rust on one side by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    More in a bit.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-10-2018 at 03:27 AM. Reason: Additions to captions for photos nos. 1 & 6
    You can never have too many clamps

  14. #119
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. Bent bolts from the 2 hp dust extractor's handle. The machine must have received a whacking great blow - most likely in transit - to have had this happen to it. Or it fell over at some point (I certainly don't remember that happening). No wonder the handle looked twisted! It isn't just a handle: it also secures one end of the fan assembly. The bolts have since been replaced!


    Bent bolts from the dust extractor handle by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Pipe clamps reassembled. This was part of my attempts yesterday to clean up the surface of a table. The clamp with the end at the top of the pipe needs some filing to get it to fit properly.


    Pipe clamps reassembled by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. State of things at ‘close of play’ on Sunday arvo. I went looking for my two sets of feeler gauges so that I could check the trunnion alignment when I went home - nowhere to be found. I had a similar look when I went back to WF the following day, Nowhere to be found. I know that I've seen both sets very recently.


    State of things at ‘close of play’ on Sunday arvo by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Today was mostly spent getting the bandsaw onto its mobile base, installing the saw's work table, and further tinkering with the tablesaw. First, I had to deal with the mobile base:


    4. Four corner plates of the mobile base all shifted around by 90°. I decided that the bandsaw might not be as stable the way round that it was, so made the change. Quite a lot of cussing and swearing ensued in the process.


    Four corner plates of the mobile base all shifted around by 90° by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Here it is, on its mobile base - and moved! It took three people to lift and place it (not including me - I had my foot on the base to stop it skating about - and the others were much fitter).


    Here it is, on its mobile base - and moved! by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Rear view of bandsaw on base. It moves about like anything. I am going to bolt it onto the base, however, as the saw shows an ominous tendency to slide about out on its new home...


    Rear view of bandsaw on base. by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I've run out of space to put up anymore bandsaw snaps for this post, so will perforce defer them to the next post, and maybe another day.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Plenty to do to get it all set up, isn't it. I hope Mr Snappy approves. My Triton is an older version of yours.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #121
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Mr snappy certainly does, although he has been keeping unusally quite of late. Probably because he's surrounded by dangerous clamps!

    I noticed your Triton a while back. The current version - yes, there is one - looks a lot more spindly than either of ours!\

    This post brings me up to date - for today, anyway.

    1. Upper cast-iron bandsaw wheel showing blade tension indicator. The pointer and scale are viewed through a small window in the upper door. The yellow object at the top RH corner of the photo is a microswitch which cuts power to the motor as soon as the front door is opened.


    Upper cast iron saw wheel showing blade tension indicator by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Lower cast iron bandsaw wheel. A pair of blade-and-tyre-cleaning brushes can be seen at the top of the wheel - if you look closely. You don't need to look so closely to see the 100 mm/4" dust-extraction port in the bottom right-hand corner.


    Lower cast iron bandsaw wheel by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. One of the pine shelves retrieved from the mezzanine wood-heap. This is also a comparison of chipboard and timber edges. Decisions, decisions.


    One of the pine shelves retrieved from the mezzanine wood-heap by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Overview of the pine shelf.


    Overview of the pine shelf by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Cabinet and trunnion secured firmly to the main table top. The right-hand table wing has been loosely bolted to the main table - I will align the table elements later.=, bofore I put the other wing on.


    Cabinet and trunnion secured firmly to the main table top by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. And now for something completely different, as the say in the classics: an expensive tin of white paint and two packets of cheap foam rollers. I wonder what they could be for? Yet Another Experiment(TM), perhaps?


    An expensive tin of white paint and two packets of cheap foam rollers by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I also got the rather heavy cast-iron table bolted onto the table support trunnion this afternoon, and added the fence support bracket, but forgot to take any photos. Mañana, as they also say in the classics. I still have to adjust and align the table properly yet.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-10-2018 at 08:16 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  17. #122
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hi Alex, That's a pretty high-class bandsaw. Lots of fun assembling stuff, eh!
    About the paint (for the lofting board is my guess), I can't quite read the label, but you need it flat (not gloss), water-based, and quick drying.
    Whatever you make the moulds out of, it's good to be able to put screws into the edges of it. When I was putting a plank on, I put a screw through the lap at each mould, with plywood clamps in between. I had about 40 of those clamps.
    I bought my Triton (an Aussie invention) in 1993. It does ripping and cross-cutting the same as yours, but I mostly use it as a router table. I have another table-saw now.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  18. #123
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Ian,

    Yes, more fun than you could poke a stick at. And it is a pretty good quality machine. Actually, one of the brushes is set on the bade, now two on the lower wheel. I would have preferred that they had stuck to their white cabinets (the lack of contart doesn't lend itself to quick trouble-shootong and cleaning, not that I am expecting problems with either), but I suppose they wanted to have a distinguishing feature from the competition (JET, and Hafco).

    As to Triton, don't get me started about the number that Hills Industries (who bought the business from George) and Bunnings did on Triton. The latter hoovered up the rights to sell Trotn stuff -0 then stuck them up the back of their tool departments, out oif the way of any competition with thier own rubbish 'Ozito' [shudder] brand. Fortunately, they seem to have survived, although they have moved their main markets to the US, UK and Europe, and their manufacturing to China. I get very, VERY cross about all this.

    I believe that the Triton made its first public appearance on the ABC show 'The Inventors', and I think that it might have won the Grand Prize, but I'm not sure.

    Anyway, like you, I will be converting the Triton over to a router table as soon as I have done the required crosscutting for the building frame - or maybe even sooner. And the table-sawing on the Carbatec machine, which is nearly ready to roll (actually, it is already rolling).

    And speaking of the paint, and bookending my last post:

    1. A slightly less expensive tin of white paint - matt acrylic this time. 30-minute touch-dry, 2 hour recoat at 25 ℃ and 50 % RH. I took the first one back to the shop back swapped it. I don’t know what possessed me to buy the gloss paint. I do know better, so there really isn’t an excuse. Amusingly, the lid of the tin says "NEW" - but there was a thick layer of dust on it. In hindsight, I probably ought to have got a tin of ceiling white, but I'm not going back to make yet another replacement: I have my 'treasured' vanity to consider, and this will do fine.


    A slightly less expensive tin of white paint by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. It's amazing what you find: these were staring me in right the face. Some better pine boards for making moulds out of! I found noticed them wil moving stuff about looking for my feeler gauges (both sets located, happily). Noting your advice about screwing things into moulds, the chipboard is right out. These boards are in.


    Staring me in the face by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Main body and table reassembled, and table wings back on. Wings are being adjusted for level with the main top at the moment. One of them has unfortunately developed a s small upwards bow which I don't seem to be able to do anything about.


    Starting work on getting the top as flat as possible by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Saw table back on its little trolley - more stable than the bandsaw-trolley setup on account of the wider area supported and the much lower centre of gravity. I will bolt the bandsaw to its trolley after sone careful drilling, etc.
    Saw table back on its little trolley by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Wrong-way-round blade removed, and tablesaw fence-rails and fence installed and adjusted. It took a lot of to-ing and fro-ing to get it right, and I still need to adjust the fence for parallel with the mitre slots and blade (and the fore-aft blade angle will probably need adjusting relate to the mitre slots as well).



    Tablesaw fence and rails installed and adjusted by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Mr Snappy joining in- he gets understandably upset if he's left out. It's OK Mr S, really it is.


    Mr Snappy joining in by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    But wait, there's more...
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-11-2018 at 07:18 PM. Reason: Sundry ongoing addtions and typo-corrections
    You can never have too many clamps

  19. #124
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. Bandsaw table in place, awaiting adjustment


    Bandsaw table in place, awaiting adjustment by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Bandsaw table securely fastened onto the trunnion assembly, and the table's across-slot parallel adjustment bolt added (ln the LH side of the photo). Some tinkering required here so that I can get the table set up at 90° to the blade.


    Bandsaw table securely fastened onto the trunnion assembly by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Dust extractor re-assembled, except for the dust bags. This was a lot more difficult and I was expecting. Not having the assembly instructions leaflet didn't help (I found it in the middle of a pile of novels last night), but not by much, I suspect. The fan/motor unit is not only very heavy, but unbalanced in a way that made handling it by myself extremely difficult, I managed in the end, by using various blocks of wood to prop the motor up. I am going to have to turn it upside down again to adjust the castors at the handle end.


    Dust extractor re-assembled by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I ran up the motors in the tablesaw and dust extractor to see if they had survived the Workswamp and subsequent storage in the sealed shipping container. They seem to have, in a no-load situation. The tablesaw's belt needs a link or two removing from it as it appears to have stretched a bit; I no doubt have the original belt in my collection of such things - it would be a simple matter of identifying it if need be. I won't try test-running the bandsaw until I've made the necessary adjustments.

    That's all for the moment. I'm taking a few days off form the boat preparations to do some things around the house and garden, and attempt to tidy up the shed at home, which is a dangerous disgrace.

    A next step, boat-wise, is to play about with that tin of paint that I've just acquired.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-11-2018 at 08:21 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

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