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Thread: Sooty Tern No. 93

  1. #386
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Here’s a snap of the current driver bit:

    Standard square bit sold in Australia - looks like a Robertson screw bit.


    Standard square bit sold in Australia - looks like a Robertson screw bit by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    The ‘R2 S2’ suggests R for Robinson and S for square. Interestingly, the Wikipedia article linked above uses the term ‘square screw’ as an alternative to ‘Robinson screw’. I could of course be totally wrong, but that bit does look tapered to me! Of course, that doesn’t mean that that the screw sockets themselves have a tapered profile. I will check that eventually.

    While I was out in the shed, I was pondering how much the priming and glue layers will bulk out the apron: it’s currently 2+ mm inside the line. I dare say it will partly depend on how much glue filler I use, but it can’t be too viscous otherwise I’d never get it spread in time. On the other hand, with the cool early spring weather here currently, now would be a good time to do the glueing to reduce the likelihood of too-rapid setting. It can sit there curing as long as it likes, as I’m in no hurry. I can’t remember exactly what happened with the bow apron, but I think that it ended up right on the line - more by good luck than good management.

    At present I‘m planning on putting one more stave on the outside face. Better to have to remove stuff than muck about glueing another one on later - maybe.

    Having done that process once (not counting the stem, which is a different bucket of snakes entirely), I will be planning this one a lot more carefully. And that includes cleanup of unset glue from the lamination. That should be easier if the staves are all at the same height.

    From memory, I think that with the bow apron and stem I taped the outside stave faces. The main problem was the slippery leaping staves.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 08-18-2022 at 05:32 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  2. #387
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    On the issue of the laminations riding up, I found that the solution is to make up some plastic-covered blocks that span across the laminations a several points and screw them down to the board underneath, before you get the clamps drawn right in.
    You're already forcing the wood to do something it doesn't naturally want to do, so a little extra force along another axis is needed.
    I went back to look for evidence of masking tape on the apron, but found none. I suspect that I didn’t pre-mask the external staves as the inboard one would have crinkled and the outboard one would have pooped off as the surfaces bent. I did mask the outboard face of the apron before I made the stem over the top of it.

    I did, however, find your post from around the time that I did the bow apron. And I obviously didn’t take it on board because I didn't do it with the stem, either. That’ll teach me... I must have got distracted by the building frame or something. There is a lot to be said for doing all the work in one place. Reading your earlier post did reinforce something that I hadn’t taken in in your more recent advice, though, i.e., that the blocks are put down before the staves are closed up. That makes sense to me now.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 09-03-2022 at 08:56 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  3. #388
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I made a mould of a square screw socket, and yes, it is tapered. You'd be mad to sell tapered driver bits for straight-edged sockets. I decided to redo the mould as it could have been done better...

    1. Green Blu Tack(TM) mould of square drive screw socket


    Square screw socket 1 by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    So, technically it is a Robertson screw, even if it isn't explicitly labelled as such.

    The extra stave has brought the apron out over the line on the board, but I'll leave it where it is for the moment. A trip to the physio has sent me off to the GP to get a referral for an X-ray and ultrasound on my left elbow. I definitely won't be doing any glueing until I've had it looked at, and it's too painful to do anything of that sort until it has calmed down. This is very frustrating: one step forward, two steps back. I've got rehearsals next week, too.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 08-15-2022 at 10:14 PM. Reason: Replaced photo
    You can never have too many clamps

  4. #389
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Still no further work on the stern apron, sadly, so continuing in my default pencil-sharpening state.

    I have to say, though, that reading threads by Ian Milne - Kotik and Hvalsoe, Mike1902 - his 12' clinker dinghy thread, Andrew Donald's Grey Seal thread, and Max F's Bow Shed and Cape Henry 21 threads, have got me more into a building frame of mind. It is great to be able to look at and study work by Master Craftspeople! I’ve read through all of these right from their respective Page Ones, except for Max’s where I have just got past the exciting boat-turning event. I have also renewed my Wooden Boat and Off Center Harbor subscriptions as well. Which, while not actual work on the boat, makes me feel as though I am .

    1. One of my large trigger/ratchet clamps


    Large trigger/ratchet clamp by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    2. The other of my two large clamps, plus the multitool


    Second large trigger/ratchet clamp by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. Yet another gadget - the multitool is a Festool OSC Vecturo, seen here with vertical stand and 65 mm blade.


    Stand and 65 mm blade by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    4. Integrated dust extractor. Adjustable depth stop in top RH corner of photo.


    Integrated dust extractor by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    The big ratchet clamps will be useful for dealing with the bending of the staves, and will hopefully save my elbow a bit. Two of these are actually sufficient for the process, although a couple more might have been useful. I stopped buying Irwin products when a 'Record' vice started shedding large flakes of paint not long after I bought it. All available corners had obviously been cut to the bone and beyond for increased profits. Record, Marples and others had at that stage been bought out by Irwin and production off-shored for each 'brand'. So I only have two of these clamps - they were very useful on the Oz Racer Mk II and it's a shame that I wouldn't allow myself to get a few more. On the Duck I in fact inverted the clamps to make a large spreader to keep the hull sides straight at one stage.

    Speaking of the elbow, I have been taking some painkillers for it, which is allowing better movement of the joint while I wait for an X-ray and ultrasound (scheduled for tomorrow). Not that the scans will actually fix it, but hopefully they will show what's going on. I've taken to wearing the arm-strap that I was wearing when I had this problem when building Wood Duck, not sure if that's helping much yet. I have been able to practise for three days in a row so far this week, plus attend a 2-hour rehearsal last night, so I've got my fingers crossed.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 11-22-2022 at 10:17 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  5. #390
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I have a couple of those Irwins, must be around 17 years old now. They have been my go to cramps for all sorts of jobs, it's like having a third hand. The I beam is more robust than newer models and has very little flex.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  6. #391
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Mike, welcome aboard this wallowing thread! Hopefully more stability soon. The I-beams are one of the things that I really like about those clamps. The robust trigger mechanism is another. Shame to hear that the I-beam has fallen by the wayside, but not surprising.

    Cheers,
    Alex,
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:42 PM. Reason: Tweaks
    You can never have too many clamps

  7. #392
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    There's some good news, and some less-good news, in this post. First the good:

    1. I've got the shed at home a lot tidier, after flattening a whole stack of cardboard boxes, moving equipment about, and other assorted tasks:


    Tidier… by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    2. More of the same:


    Tidier 2 by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    3. I've been playing about with the long clamps - and I am REALLY going to need Mr Zimm's hold-down blocks! (But see also the less-good news below.) The excess length is going to be trimmed before glueing to make things a bit easier in some respects, and a bit harder in others.


    Long clamps test by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. Various template-loftings dragged out of storage, with a view to cutting 'em up. That's Max F's sooty Tern rudder blade on top, with Iain's rudder head and rudder under that, followed by the centreboard and other bits and pieces that I lofted last year or the year before that, before putting them away for safe keeping.


    Various template loftings dragged out of storage by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    5. Lower (forward) end of apron moved sternwards a bit. I'll move it back a bit so that I can clamp it back onto S14. I’m trying to maximise the use of the thinner staves. I'm going to remove bow apron clamping block B11 (under the long clamp), too.


    Lower (forward) end of apron moved sternwards a bit by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    The less-good news is that I went to see the GP today, to get the results of the scans that I had on my elbow on Friday. The x-rays showed now current or past breakages, but the ultrasound scans show that I have a torn ligament that I am going to have to be extremely patient and careful with and allow it to heal more or less by itself. This is going to take a few months, and also includes not putting any further undue stress on the joint. That means avoiding almost all boat-building.. Again.

    It's not a very serious health problem, but it certainly is a very frustrating one, just as I was starting to get back to boat construction. I see the Physio later this week, then a followup GP appointment, both of which are for planning a way forward with this. As I said a few posts back, one step forward, two steps back. Or maybe three... I'll just have to content myself with vicarious reading of other people's threads in the meantime. Having renewed my subscription to OCH, I'm rewatching Geoff Kerr's great Oughtred Caledonia Yawl kit-build series (42 videos), too.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:30 PM. Reason: Tweaks, additions, typos fixed
    You can never have too many clamps

  8. #393
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Just browsed your thread. You've assembled quite the workshop and gotten off to a good start. Lots of details here. Sorry about the ligament issue. I tore ligaments in my foot when teenage. Seems I was out of commission for 6 weeks or so. Worse than that was some tendonitis that I've had a couple times. We're talking a year or more to clear up. Wishing you a speedy recover and all the best!

  9. #394
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Alex, Sorry to hear about your injury. Take care and heal properly. I can kind of relate since I just tore my meniscus. Physical Therapy and lots of ice will be your friend.

    I too value the Geoff Kerr video series.

    Have you decided on which sail rig you are going to use? I bet the Gunter rig would be wicked fast.
    Last edited by timber_cruiser; 08-28-2022 at 06:12 PM.

  10. #395
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by dalekidd View Post
    Just browsed your thread. You've assembled quite the workshop and gotten off to a good start. Lots of details here. Sorry about the ligament issue. I tore ligaments in my foot when teenage. Seems I was out of commission for 6 weeks or so. Worse than that was some tendonitis that I've had a couple times. We're talking a year or more to clear up. Wishing you a speedy recover and all the best!
    Hello Dale, thank you do your kind remarks and welcome to this sporadic thread. Fingers crossed that I don't get tendonitis on top of the tear!


    Quote Originally Posted by timber_cruiser View Post
    Alex, Sorry to hear about your injury. Take care and heal properly. I can kind of relate since I just tore my meniscus. Physical Therapy and lots of ice will be your friend.

    I too value the Geoff Kerr video series.

    Have you decided on which sail rig you are going to use? I bet the Gunter rig would be wicked fast.
    Hello timber_cruiser, likewise, thank you for your kind remarks and welcome ot the thread. I hope that you get over the tear soon! I'm not a great fan of the ice treatment, but it is helping. As to the sail rig, definitely the lug yawl rig - the sloop rig would be way too frisky for me, and doesn't have the useful self-correcting advantages of the yawl rig. the sloop rig also has standing rigging and its associated maintenance problems, neither of which I'm very keen on. Plus I like the look of the yawl rig .

    Well, I have been slowly going over where I've got up to with the boat, and have realised that I have a number of somewhat interdependant sub-projects on the go at the moment. This means getting the least dependant things done first. I need to get the Manning benches sorted, plus the lathe on a couple of mobile bases, plus the building frame finished.

    I have also been reading the Gougeon Brothers' (2005 edition) epoxy manual finally, which has been very useful. A number of things that other epoxy workers no doubt take for granted have become a lot clearer to me. I've been bit of fiddling away at the moulding setup for the stern apron, as the moulding board is sitting on top of bits for the Manning benches, so that needs to be done as a matter of priority. That setup has been annoying me, the worst bit being that the nails that I used to hold the blocks down shifted under the pressure of the clamped staves, so are no longer square to the boar, and most of the blocks are also not in the right positions (not that they were to begin with). As a result, I've stripped it right back:

    1. First, the blocks were yanked off using a jemmy (pry-bar) -


    Stern apron blocks removed by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.




    2. The plastic sheet was then unhitched, and the nail (and former screw) craters smoothed off with the flush plane.


    Tabula semi-rasa - board cleared of blocks and plastic sheet by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    3. The blocks were denailed and the shims removed and generally cleaned up. I also re-checked the bottom and front faces of the blocks for squareness - some had to be turned 180°. Fortunately, I don't seem to need to cut any more. I'll screw these back down using pre-drilled holes in new positions for both holes and blocks.


    Blocks de-nailed and shims removed by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. I also got a couple of these clamp blocks for the rear end of the 10" tablesaw fence. I keep forgetting not to lift up the fence at the front, and break them on a regular basis. I am considering making some slightly less fragile versions out of a hard hardwood, epoxy-coated to reduce any moisture-induced size change and rusting tendencies. And with the grain suitably oriented so that they don't split quite so readily.


    Fence clamp block by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    So, baby steps still. I decided that since I haven't been and am not likely to be doing much of a significant nature for a bit, I might as well soothe my OCD and sort out the stem apron moulding setup. And it does make me feel - however deluded - that I am actually doing something. To that latter end, I have also been rechecking the measurements for the fore and aft stem support beam cutouts as given by the stems 'loftings',. To have been true loftings, I should have and lofted faired entire boat - which I now regret not having done, for the experience as well as other issues. I'll will mark various lines out on the bow apron soon, too.

    Another thing that I have been pondering is moving everything back here to the shed, rather than splitting the work over two fairly separate sites. It would be a lot more convenient and efficient, but I would have to do some radical rearrangement of the shed furniture to fit it all, or even part of it, in. And it would have its own significant logistical problems in terms of moving heavy machinery and large items such as the building frame (even disassembled). At present the convenience of ahving everything in one place is outweighed by the massive inconvenience of doing it. Best to let sleeping dogs lie, as it were.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:29 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  11. #396
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Good to see you back at it Alex.
    Even baby steps make a boat.
    I liked " tabula semi rasa" a lot!

    Cheers
    Max

  12. #397
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Vielen Dank, Max, es ist besser als nichts.

    Well, having gone through all the conniptions of finding out about square drives in Aus, here is what the local hardware store had:

    16G x 100 mm 8 TPI anti-corrosion-coated Torx-drive screws for the lamination hold-down blocks. No square-drive screws of that length to be found (out of stock). They look pretty robust:


    16G x 100 mm Torx drive screws for the lamination holddowns by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    The Wikipedia article on Torx drives goes into a bit of detail in the comparison of Torx and hex-drives, noting that Torx have greater cam-out resistance than hex drives, and much greater resistance than Philips heads. The improvements in driver clutch technology is also mentioned in as a reason for the rise in popularity of the Torx family. I’ve only known them previously from computers parts, but have been wondering recently why they haven’t been more mainstream - question partly answere..

    It remains to be seen how they work, but one thing in their favour is their heft. The T30 Torx spec is 5.6 mm point-to-point so I’m not anticipating problems, especially as I will be pre-drilling the blocks at 5mm. The screws are self-countersinking, so driving them down into the blocks as far as is necessary probably won’t be a problem, either. Happily, the packet includes a T30 driver bit, which will hopefully last the eight to twelve screws needed to complete the process. That 3/4 inch of steeper-pitched thread is interesting, maybe it’s to speed up the screwing process.

    I am still scratching around for more spare bits of 4x2 - I’ll have to bite the bullet soon and go up to the now-slightly-less-freezing-cold workshop/wood store soon and do some more digging (I do have some 4x2 meranti but that might be a bit of a waste).

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:28 PM. Reason: Tweaks, reduced photo size, more tweaks
    You can never have too many clamps

  13. #398
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I have just caught up on this thread, Alex. I don't get emails from WB any more for postings on subscribed threads. No idea why. Good on you for plugging on slowly, but take care!

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #399
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Ian, that's weird - I seem to be getting more than I used to. And I don't seem to be getting logged out at the drop of a hat, either. I'm not complaining about either of those, though. Maybe it's because I renewed my WB subscription, or maybe I've passed a certain number of forum posts (450?). No idea. Have the post notificsations gone into your email's spam folder on account of some unknown background change? That's where I tend to look if there's something that I know I should have got and haven't.

    Anyway, thank you very much for dropping by again. I was beginning to think in my usual paranoid way that the Antipodeans were avoiding me. I am taking care - doing my exercise and applying icepacks as directed by the Physio, and I have an appointment with a sports physician next week. The elbow is feeling slightly better, which is a warning to me to not start overdoing things again.


    I should have got this essential reference book decades ago:

    Bootle’s wood book (this is the 2nd, revised, edition)


    Bootle’s Wood Book (2nd Edition) by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    No doubt all the other Aust members of this forum have it except for me. Well, that's sorted.

    I tried out the new screws today - undrilled they split the wood, 6 mm is too big a pilot hole and I can't find my 5 mm bradpoint bit. So still not getting very far - which is probably just as well (see above).

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:25 PM. Reason: Style tweaks
    You can never have too many clamps

  15. #400
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1N View Post



    . I was beginning to think in my usual paranoid way that the Antipodeans were avoiding me .








    Just quietly observing from across the Tassie



    Keep up the good work.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  16. #401
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    That serves me right!
    You can never have too many clamps

  17. #402
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I haven’t been idle regarding the boat and related tasks (actually entirely the latter), but I have also been caught up with other things, namely concerts and rehearsals - and a lot more driving than I’m currently used to. It has got rather frustrating - again. I do have some snaps to put up, but 1. I’m still recovering from the above melee; and 2. I’m beginning to think that 95% of this thread would have been better off in a thread in the ‘Materials and Tools’ section of the forum.

    On a slightly related topic, after an unwonted burst of commenting on other people’s threads, I’ve decided to pull my head in again. Since what I know about boats and boat-building would get lost on the pointy end of a very sharp pin, my comments come across as arrogant and patronising - so I am desisting.

    Updates - such as they are - will be forthcoming once I’m less stressed, and can sit at the computer rather than the ing ipad.
    You can never have too many clamps

  18. #403
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1N View Post
    Vielen Dank, Max, es ist besser als nichts!

    Well, having gone through all the conniptions of finding out about square drives in Aus, here is what the local hardware store had:

    16G x 100 mm 8 TPI anti-corrosion-coated Torx-drive screws for the lamination hold-down blocks. No square-drive screws of that length to be found (out of stock). They look pretty robust:


    16G x 100 mm Torx drive screws for the lamination holddowns by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    The Wikipedia article on Torx drives goes into a bit of detail in the comparison of Torx and hex-drives, noting that Torx have greater cam-out resistance than hex drives, and much greater resistance than Philips heads. The improvements in driver clutch technology is also mentioned in as a reason for the rise in popularity of the Torx family (which I’ve only known previously from computers parts, but have been wondering recently why they haven’t been more mainstream - question partly answered ).

    It remains to be seen how they work, but one thing in their favour is their heft. The T30 Torx spec is 5.6 mm point-to-point so I’m not anticipating problems, especially as I will be pre-drilling the blocks at 5mm. The screws are self-countersinking, so driving them down into the blocks as far as is necessary probably won’t be a problem, either. Happily, the packet includes a T30 driver bit, which will hopefully last the eight to twelve screws needed to complete the process. That 3/4 inch of steeper-pitched thread is interesting, maybe it’s to speed up the screwing process.

    I am still scratching around for more spare bits of 4x2 - I’ll have to bite the bullet soon and go up to the now-slightly-less-freezing-cold workshop/wood store soon and do some more digging (I do have some 4x2 meranti but that might be a bit of a waste ).

    Cheers,
    Alex.

    Try online, or if you have an Aussie Fasteners nearby.
    https://aussiefasteners.com.au/
    without freedom of speech, we wouldn't know who the idiots are.

  19. #404
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Thanks WX. I had a look at their website, which only showed general product categories carried. A ninternet search showed up a large number of vendors. I had a look at one near the top of the list - Bolt and Nut Australia - and they not only had a (purportedly) larger range, but had stuff itemised in a very well-laid-out manner.

    I ordered 20 x 125 mm galvanised square drive 4.8 mm dia. wood screws with self-countersinking heads. No fancy ceramic coatings but they’re not going to be in place long enough to deteriorate. Or they shouldn’t be. The usual (local) place that I get SST and other fasteners from doesn’t have an online catalogue, so I cut to the chase. They were cheaper in quantity so I ordered 20 delivered via Startrack, shipping today apparently (albeit from Brisbane, I’m on the bushy outskirts o’ Sydney).

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 09-27-2022 at 01:56 AM. Reason: Splegnil, plus corrections
    You can never have too many clamps

  20. #405
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Yet more pencil sharpening. Or tool purchasing - much the same thing where I'm concerned.

    1. What's in the Big Box? What's a WBS-2200C and why does it apparently need a forklift to move it?


    Big box by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    2. Well, it's a Big Belt Sander. Support/cabinet parts on building frame in background. 2HP 15A motor, 2260 x 150 mm oscillating belt. There’s lots of instructions on how to adjust and fine tune the belt, in the manual.


    Heavy item by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.




    3. The rear side of the sander. The controls for changing the angle of the bed (0°- 90°), belt tension, etc., live here. The justification, I mean excuse, for such a big unit is that I intend to use it a lot in 90° mode, and this is actually the smallest/cheapest Carbatec model that offered this. Others had vertical belts, but I wanted one that had the sanding surface running laterally, not vertically. And I didn't want a disc sander.


    Big Belt Sander by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.




    4. Everything is more-or-less pre-assembled, there is just the flat-pack cabinet (and the drum-table and various handles) to make up and attach. The feet will be replaced with bolts


    Sander cabinet right way up on feet (temporarily) by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    5. The feet wil be replaced with this:


    Mobile machine base and others by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    6. Which will be fitted to the chipboard seen here (and an offcut from the moulds plywood, not seen here). The smaller pieces are 15 mm plywood for mounting the lathe on so that that can be moved about, too (same type of base parts as seen above). I glued all pairs together, clamped with screws. I'll need to tune the tablesaw's fence before I cut the glued blocks to size. I will definitely need help getting the cabinet/mobile base attached to the machine then the right way up...


    Plywood and chipboard parts for mobile machinery bases by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    As a side note, I may have recently discovered why I keep getting logged out of the forum - it could be Safari objecting to the security of the forum (Safari, Firefox and Duck-Duck-Go all warn that the site is insecure, i.e., it doesn't use https). After the recent really bad mega-hacking event of a major telco involving millions of people here in Aus, however, that's not a bad thing at all (the national and state governments and Federal Police have had to get involved, and the FBI has been brought in from the US 'to help with their enquiries', it's a shocker). The forum software moving to using https instead of http would be better, though.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 09-28-2022 at 06:30 PM. Reason: Added bit about the oscillating belt
    You can never have too many clamps

  21. #406
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    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    You will love that sander Alex.
    It would be one of the most used pieces of machinery in my workshop.
    The end plate on the left side could be removed on mine, so I made a table extension allowing the drum to be utilised for concave surfaces, a sort of bobbin sander equivalent.
    Great piece of kit.
    Enjoy.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  22. #407
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. Clamps used to fix the boards' alignment, screws added, then clamps removed. A few extra screws added during the glueing; I did the same with the lathe blocks


    Clamping screws on the sander board by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    2. I epoxied the three board sets together...


    All three board sets glued up by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    3.There's a 'but', of course - I got the hardener:resin ratio wrong using 60ml syringes and the glue didn't set properly. The two boards levered apart with the greatest of ease, using a broad chisel that needs a new bevel ground on it. A glue failure is most unusual for me, and hasn't happen since a WEST pump failed on me (out of the box) and metered only a third of what it should have. That was a much more 'fun' experience that this, which previous amusing event involved 6oz glass cloth on a very carefully shaped foil. I laughed my head off.


    Here’s the but - I got the hardener amount wrong by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. The unset glue came off easily enough, using a heavy blunt instrument. Note the dry patches on the plywood; I couldn't find the squeegees, and what I really needed is one of those WEST cards with little teeth/notches machined in them around the edges (I don't have one)


    Sticky glue removed using a broad chisel that needed sharpening by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    5. The blob of removed glue was still soft after four days - even five... I could have just left the boards screwed together rather than glue them, but decided that I needed some practise with epoxy again. Just as well, as it turned out.


    Glue still not hard after four days… by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    6. Test placement of the (as-yet-wheel-less) BORA mobile base parts before glueing. The bit missing from the plywood will be replaced with a glue/resin-saturated glass rovings mixture - this was the largest piece of thick-ish plywood that I have at the moment.


    Test fit of the Bora mobile base corner parts by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    A bit more in a bit. So many pencils, so little time available...
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:23 PM. Reason: Lpegnisl
    You can never have too many clamps

  23. #408
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    511

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    You will love that sander Alex.
    It would be one of the most used pieces of machinery in my workshop.
    The end plate on the left side could be removed on mine, so I made a table extension allowing the drum to be utilised for concave surfaces, a sort of bobbin sander equivalent.
    Great piece of kit.
    Enjoy.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Hello Mike,

    Thanks . I'm going to have to be cautious using this wee beastie, it's a bit intimidating. Over and above the usual machine tool caution(s), I hasten to add.

    The left-hand endplate (and dust collector) on this hinges back to allow the heavy cast-iron table for the drum (with special cutout) to be installed - it's a removable item. It's a very well thought-out piece of kit - at 141 kg (350-ish lbs).

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:22 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  24. #409
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    511

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. I roughed up the edge of the plywood sheet with a square coarse Perma-Grit file, to give the intended glue-fill at least something to key into. Not really necessary, but, well, you know...


    Roughing up plywood edge to key in some filler a bit better by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    2. Having acquired such a big sander, I found that I needed to beef up my dust extraction, which meant replacing the concertina-type ducting with smooth-walled stuff. I'll be using the clear sections at key points, but intend to replace all the slinky-coil ducts with 100mm PVC stormwater pipe, eventually. It's cheaper - but only by a bit, surprisingly. Note the temporary vice made using two clamps and one of the moulding blocks.


    Dust extraction kit with clear ducting by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    3. I got a w i d e roll o' duct tape to make sure that the (unglueable) ducting joins are as air-tight as possible...


    Wide duct tape by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. I replaced the broken rear tablesaw fence clamp with one of the new ones:


    New rear fence clamp by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    5. I collect interesting bits of wood for use at a later date - here's some sections of Protea sp. tree (and privacy screen) that came down in our front yard recently, after months and months and months of heavy, relentless rain


    Some Protea sp. trunk sections by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    6. Cross-sections of the waxed trunk pieces. The wax couldn't cope with strain release (nor is it meant to), see the radial crack on the RH side of the front log. The crack hasn't got much bigger since I first noticed it, but I don't know how far down it goes.


    Waxed Protea trunk ends by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    I have another new toy as well, which I'll put up later.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 09-28-2022 at 04:33 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  25. #410
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. The lazy person's spirit level:


    New toy part 1 by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    2. I tried the thing out using the shed as a reference - the shed company did a pretty good job.


    New toy part 2 by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    3. And here it actually is - it's a Makita 3-line 360° green laser level - they claim that the green laser is more visible than the red one. As a result it uses a bit more juice being a shorter (therefore higher-energy) wavelength, but it's not as though I'm going to be using it 8 hours a day


    New toy part 3a by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. It's surprisingly small, and quite light as well: 133 x 104 x 153 mm (5.24 x 4.09 x 6.02 in), weight with 2.0 Ah Li-ion battery 1155 g (2.55 lbs). It can mount on a tripod using a 1/4" thread, and comes with its own little flat stand


    New toy part 3b by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    This is going to be used to help set up the moulds on the building frame, as well as re-checking the level of the latter. And if I have to move the BF back home for any reason (I'm not intending to, I hasten to add), it will be useful there, too.


    5. And 20 x 125 mm square-drive woodscrews, just arrived in the post:


    Hold-down screws by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    The screws actually give some sense of scale to the level.


    What I really need to do now is get a wriggle on and build the jolly boat. The mobile bases need to get sorted first, however, followed by assembling the sander and hooking it up to the extraction system, then on to the stern apron and stem after tweaking the many wonky (unsquare) moulding blocks on the new sander, and get the Manning benches done, and...
    Last edited by Alex1N; 09-28-2022 at 06:15 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  26. #411
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I still haven't been idle, but still not back at the actual boat:

    1. I did some preliminary checking of the building frame using the laser level: the frame at this point (stern-apron bearer) is at least plumb in this plane, but the bow-apron support bearer isn’t square with the reference (stbd) frame bearer. It's actually much further out than the 'somewhat tweaked 'for the camera' photo indicates - by about 25 mm/1" - some adjusting to do there at the very least...


    Frame is plumb on this axis, but the bow support bearer isn’t square with the reference (stbd) frame bearer… by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    2. Two lathe pad parts squared up, ready for glueing together, then edge- and corner-rounding. Note the template for the lathe foot bolt holes. The centrelines for the pad will be drawn in at some point to line the template up. In the end, it turned out that the pad corners were far closer to 90° than the (relatively expensive) mobile base corner units are. Good cutting discipline on the tablesaw, if nothing else.


    Two lathe pad parts squared up by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    3. Sander pad likewise squared up, with a quick check to see if I left enough room for the cabinet.


    Sander support squared up by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. It seems that I did: quite a bit of room on the opposite corner.


    Quite a bit of room on the opposite corner, too by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    5. The idea for using filler and glass cloth to fill in the corner was abandoned in favour of simply shaping a plywood offcut to fit and glueing it in place, as that seemed a cleaner and generally more satisfactory - and obvious - solution. This isn't quite as load-bearing as the area directly around the bolt hole, and the whole corner will be constrained not only by the 10 mm SST cabinet bolt, but three 6 mm bolts securing that corner's mobile-base plate. The addition of the plywood involved some removal of set epoxy glue - interestingly, the thin remaining original layer of glue that hadn't set was still tacky, meaning that the extra small amount of hardener that I added to the second glueing attempt hadn't migrated into the old glue as I was hoping it would. If it did, it only went maybe a molecule or so deep. That little task took a surprising amount bit of cleaning up, sanding and scraping, and clogged up my flat Perma-grit file (easy to clean up - carefully - with, e.g., a nail point, however). At this stage I've already rounded over the corner uprights and edges (in that order) of the three pads, using a 3 mm (1/8") roundover bit in the palm router.


    Plywood insert clamped while the glue sets by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    6. I overestimated the amount of glue needed so I had quite a bit of excess - so I filled in the screw holes on all three pads and still had some left over. I was originally going to use the Bote-Cote lightweight sanding filler powder for this, but that didn't quite happen as I intended it to...


    Screw holes filled with excess glue by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    More shortly.
    You can never have too many clamps

  27. #412
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    511

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. One of the hole-filled lathe pads. I sliced off the excess resin using the then-still-quite-sharp flush plane the day after filling, while it was still reasonably elastic/rubbery - but it it was getting close ot being not sliceable. The flush plane now needs sharpening.


    Lathe pad with glue-filled screw holes 1 by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    2. The wood that I cut these Manning bench legs from was full of knots, which made neat freehand cutting on the tablesaw rather 'difficult', shall we say. You can see a jag in the cut-line on the top left leg, which is fairly indicative of the lack of quality of all cuts, excepting the board-slimming ones made against the fence. I've grouped the legs in three sets according to width, here. My lining out was also a bit wonky and I had forgotten that the boards needed one side trimming by about an inch (25-ish mm), which meant some juggling with the tablesaw fence. Even so, the widths are all different, hence the three 'nearest-neighbour' groupings. I'm not terribly fussed as the benches, while they certainly need to be functionally fit-for-purpose (square), don't need to be heirloom-class joinery projects. I will do some measuring, lining and careful cutting against the fence to get the legs as close to each other as possible so that I don't have to thrash around getting the notches in the bench tops custom-fitted to each leg - well, as little as possible, anyway.


    Eight Manning bench legs by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. I had a bit of a fun time when I started marking out the location of the cabinet and its bolt holes: when I went to check the mobile-base plate diagonals, looked as though they were colliding with the cabinet corners. I retreated to the phone and looked up the snaps that I took of two opposite cabinet corners after I'd squared off the sander pad. I concluded happily that I had got one or more measurements wrong, so went back to the workshop to check. I had in fact made an error in the long cabinet dimension measurement. All fixed now and the bolt locations drawn in. Note also the pool of filler over the sander pad insert join line - that will will require care in removing it as it is now quite hard.


    Sander cabinet bolt location by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. Overview of patched corner.


    Patched corner awaiting sanding by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    5. The corner adjacent to the one in the snap above, with centre-popped bolt centre-mark and the outermost position of the cabinet corner's radius: there's plenty of room for the sander's cabinet on the pad, without encroaching anywhere near the top angle plate of the mobile-base units. The radius is marked by the little tick-mark. You can also see where I've sliced off the original filler resin - unfortunately, I'd failed to remember that the clamping screws had come out through the bottom of the board, leaving bottomless holes. The filler naturally flowed out somewhat, leaving a number of (thankfully not-too-deep) dimples to fill. This is the lightweight sanding filler finally being employed for the first time since I've had the substance (over 12.5 years), and even though it his a bit less than 24 hours old, it is quite hard by this point. More care required in removal so as not to gouge the surrounding soft birch plywood and necessitating even more filling (and leading to a table/chair-with-no-legs situation). Original cabinet-side marking still visible to the right of the new klineafter rubbing out with an 'art gum' rubber/eraser/whatever.


    Adjacent corner with bolt and cabinet corner marks by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    6. The belt sander's pad marked up for sander cabinet and centre-popped for 12 mm bolt holes. Bolts will be 10 mm (3/8”), 12 mm allows for some wiggle room ‘just in case’... The bolt holes for the four mobile-base units will be marked and centre-punched once the filled chipboard (and plywood) pad edges have been sanded flat again. Why the piece of (flooring) chipboard? I'd run out of suitably-sized pieces of mould offcuts (hence also the need for the insert - this was the largest leftover piece of close to the right dimensions for the pad). Note the radically altered cabinet width value towards the bottom of the photo 485 down from 585 mm...


    Belt sander pad marked up for sander cabinet and centre-popped for 12 mm bolt holes by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    And that brings me up to date - still busy sharpening away at the pencils, but I'm hoping that the pencil lengths will reach vanishingly-small dimensions soon. Once the belt sander is operational, I will be able the get on with laminating the stern stem parts and reclaim three out of the four Manning bench anvil parts that I dragooned into becoming the supports for the laminating table.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-05-2022 at 03:02 AM. Reason: Pstoys, tweaks, etc.
    You can never have too many clamps

  28. #413
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    511

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I recently discovered Bernadette’s great cutter thread on the forum, wherein she also mentions her boat-building diary. That gave me a bit of a prod, because I had started one for the Sooty only for it to falter and get forgotten in late 2020. Thanks to Bernadette’s thread, I went digging for it and found it after not too much effort, restarting it in late September (‘22). That’s now being updated on a more-or-less daily basis at the moment, reflecting my current burst of activity - at least on getting the two separate workspaces up to speed, if nothing else.

    I’ve finally taken note of some friendly off-forum advice, and am backing off on the workshop/tools side of things on this thread. That can stay safely shifted out of harm’s way with my return to ‘diarising’ on pen and paper, for my own consumption only. One of Bernadette’s posts on her cutter thread also alerted me to a ‘Materials and Tools’ section of the forum, where 99.9% of this thread would have been placed much more appropriately, but I’ll now clamp (ahem) down on that completely. The less that I fixate on tools and their acquisition (and the more that I stay on my own thread), the better for me and everyone else.

    Having said that, I still have a mountain of chisels and plane blades to restore and sharpen (two years spent stored in a damp shipping container after our moving house did terrible things to the various steel objects trapped inside) - a task that I have been assiduously avoiding. I won’t be giving an account of that either though, you’ll be relieved to hear. That set of tasks is going to lenghten the amount of time before I have anything boatish to report (I truly loathe sharpening, because I’ve never been able to do it). I’m also going to be de-sensationalising my posts in future, with much less use of exclamation marks and emoji. There may even be a retrospective cull thereof: I’ve got rather annoyed with my teenage writing style.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-18-2022 at 08:19 PM. Reason: Addition about writing style
    You can never have too many clamps

  29. #414
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    Mar 2010
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I’m going to ‘celebrate’ my 500th WBF post by announcing that I’m discontinuing this thread.

    I have been reading a number of the Ilur threads on here lately, plus others, and I am embarrassed and humiliated by the fantastic signal-to-noise ratios of all of them - my own is 99.99999% noise. I had lined up some posts about electric outboards, acquisitions of wood for battens and spars, the building frame, and my recent decision to start uploading photos to the forum after discovering exactly how much my Flickr ‘Pro’ account is costing me. These won’t be posted.

    This doesn’t mean that I’m stopping work on the boat (or whatever it is that I think I’m doing in relation to the boat), it’s just that I have decided to relieve myself of the mental burden of feeling compelled to post here, as I have done in the past. I continue with my paper diary, for my own uses.

    Here’s a bit of doggerel that I tapped out last week, which should make my decision to stop this nonsense clearer:

    I have a bit of a problem, in that I am - or like to think of myself as - a perfectionist. This makes things take a lot longer, and if I’m dissatisfied, what I’m working on either gets dismantled if possible, or if not, junked and put in the spare bits pile. This is often a rather impractical use of time and resources, and leads to a lot of frustration. If things get too bad I’ll simply stop, which has happened a number of times on this project (I can’t really call it a build yet, as the only thing that I’ve actually built is the building frame). I go looking for problems too late, and having found them, react badly. I have been getting some professional help with this, but as it’s a lifelong problem and somewhat genetic/biochemical, it’s taking quite a lot of time and effort to change things.

    So rather than continuing to inflict my ‘lifelong problems’ on the innocent, I’m calling this thread quits. You never know, doing this might even speed up my building - stranger things have happened.

    I should say in fairness to myself that my boatbuilding is not quite as bad as I make it out to be. One of the things that I have done habitually in the past is deliberately bagging myself in order to put people off, and give them a false idea of my abilities. I’m not swinging to the other extreme either. If you’re interested or curious, you can find examples of my work on my first boat here.

    Finally, my heartfelt thank to those who have contributed to this thread - your comments and advice were always greatly appreciated, even if I didn’t actually take any notice, or appear to take any notice. I’ll be staying on the forum reason, but no longer posting. The final thing will be clicking the ‘Close this thread’ button below.

    Best regards and au revoir,
    Dr Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 11-07-2022 at 11:24 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

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