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Thread: Sooty Tern No. 93

  1. #176
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    You an never have too many powerpoints (or clamps)

  2. #177
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Hugh,

    Yes, indeed .

    I finally got the mould station loftings done:

    1. Points-plotting for moulds complete


    Points-plotting for moulds complete by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Station 7 - almost ‘perfect’: Matches all plotted points, and to less than 0.5 mm in the one worst case. The hard work on the grid paid off!


    Station 7 - almost ‘perfect’ by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. All forward stations lofted, including ‘2A’ for sloop version, for completeness.


    All forward stations lofted, including ‘2A’ for sloop version by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Flat-head nails for transferring the line onto the S7 mould, per Alex J Zimm’s advice, here. Thank you, Alex! Nail heads are all tangent to the curve. The corresponding nail slots on the mould timber will be used to run a batten to draw the shape against.


    Flat-head nails for transferring the line onto the S7 mould by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Building Frame line added: I forgot to draw this in along with the waterlines (unlike in the first version of the mould lines). It’s an essential element as it vertically aligns all moulds on the building frame.


    Building Frame line added by Alex1N, on Flickr.

    More in a bit.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-05-2019 at 08:37 PM. Reason: Added Alex Zimm references, tidied up formatting.
    You can never have too many clamps

  3. #178
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    A week ago I acquired 75 kg of lead in the form of three 25 kg ingots.

    1. Three lead ingots, 25 kg each, sitting on the car floor between the front and rear seats.


    Three lead ingots, 25 kg each by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Lead on trolley. It was quite heavy dragging it up the short hill to the shed.


    Lead on the trolley by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I also got busy and finished off the remaining toolboards this last weekend:

    3. Toolboard for lathe, fixed in position.


    Toolboard for lathe, fixed in position by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Drill press/bandsaw pegboard installed.


    Closer view of drill press pegboard by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. All hooks and most tools in place on the lathe toolboard. The remaining ones are at home while I work on the lofting.


    All hooks and most tools in place by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Drill press toolboard complete. The respirator was something of an afterthought and I may find a better spot for it - or maybe not.


    Drill press toolboard ‘complete’ by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    That's a couple of tasks out of the way. I had such a terrible time misplacing tools when building the 'Duck that I vowed that that wouldn't ever happen again; so now I have little excuse.

    I got stuck into installing the blade guard/upper dust extractor for the tablesaw today, and it now only needs some minor adjustments and connecting up to the dust extractor. And I need to install the antistatic wires in the ducting. After that, it's the turn of the thicknesser trolley - which I am needing a functioning tablesaw for. There's some snaps of the blade dust-extraction gantry conniptions, but they have yet to be sifted through and the selected ones uploaded to Flickr, so that's something for another day. I'm still not absolutely convinced as to how useful it will be in its current table-mounted configuration. The alternative ceiling arrangement would be my preference, but one of the garage doors would be in the way when lifted.

    Attempts to transfer the curve tangents of Station 7 still haven't been made yet: I appear to be trying to avoid that.

    That's enough for now.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  4. #179
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    This is the penultimate post of the penultimate workshop section in this thread: at least, that is my current intention, and these things can change.

    1. Second attempt at a scrap spacer for the dust-extraction hood gantry’s column. Top piece is 17 mm form-ply, bottom piece is an offcut of 19 mm Turpentine floorboard from the old house.


    2nd attempt at a scrap spacer for the dust-extraction hood gantry’s column by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Spacer has passed its first test: its predecessor's holes were all over the place. I over-drilled all the holes at 8 mm for 6 mm bolts.


    Spacer passed its first test by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Spacer in place on the tablesaw.


    Spacer in place on the tablesaw by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Second turnbuckle stay installed, after a bit of drilling through the rear fence support and table edge.


    Second turnbuckle stay installed by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Gantry mostly assembled: a bit of adjustment needed here and there.


    Gantry mostly assembled by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Dust hood installed, perched in raised position.


    Dust hood installed, in raised position by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I am going to make a start on the patterns transfers shortly, once I've sorted out the bits of pine shelving and worked out if I need any more.

    And the tablesaw needs connecting fully to the dust extractor with antistatic lines put in place, too.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-05-2019 at 11:13 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  5. #180
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I got the tablesaw cranked up yesterday arvo, and it made an excellent cut across the piece of 17-mm to be used as the castor base for the thicknesser trolley. Not so good - and somewhat expected - was the lack of performance by the dust extraction system. This would have largely been the result of a number of very large holes in the tablesaw cabinet (per its design) reducing the pressure; and the 4-metre length of hose used to hook up the overhead suction guard would not have helped matters either. Where I am expecting a significant improvement in the hoovering is with the bandsaw and jointer, which have both been designed for (and require) dust extraction.

    1. Spaghetti loops


    Spaghetti loops by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Reasonably clean cut from the brand-new CMT tablesaw blade; pity about the out-of-alignment splitter, as it kept throwing the board off-course. I had forgotten to reset it.


    Nice clean cut from the brand-new CMT tablesaw blade by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Here's a short sequence of stuff more germane to the boat itself again. I needed to get the building frame side members into the shed to check out spatial issues:

    3. First building frame side member into the shed. I needed to get a proper idea of the bulk of the building frame as it will affect the moveable elements of the workshop - including me!


    First building frame side member into the shed by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. LVL from the other end. Quite a few things are going to have to be moved about to optimise the space around the boat and frame. Note that the frame members are 100 mm short of the required length: I will be cobbling together an extended bow (or stern) crosspiece to make up the difference. More on that when I actually get to it.


    LVL from the other end by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Both building frame side members. They are lined up on one of the two sets of chalked corners that I put down a month or two ago.


    Both building frame side members by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Some things are going to have to be moved, e.g., the Triton (but not yet, as I have stuff to use it for in its current location; and the thicknesser trolley top and probably its castor base are going to have to be put on (further) diets.


    Some things are going to have to be moved by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I've got the pine shelving down from Wentworth Falls and assigned most of them to various stations. I've also been playing about with the lofting board to work out a sort-of-optimum width for the mould pieces, consistent with the materials to hand.

    More on that in a little bit.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-06-2019 at 01:48 AM. Reason: Lots of editing
    You can never have too many clamps

  6. #181
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Here's some snaps of the thicknesser table and the mould conniptions:

    1. ‘Thicknesser trolley’ cleaned up a bit. The modifications - with a handsaw - will start in earnest next time I'm up there.


    ‘Thicknesser trolley’ cleaned up a bit by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. That’s going to be a bit of a squeeze, especially with the wider base for the castors added.


    That’s going to be a bit of a squeeze by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. A bit of head-scratching required. The building frame will need to be rotated clockwise a bit. I will also trim the long edges of the trolley top and probably the castor base, too. Note that the former vice/grinder benchlet at the end of the main bench in the background was removed for clearance, but it was obviousy still not enough.


    A bit of head-scratching required by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Working out a rough shape for the mould for Station 1, in pencil. It worked out at around 125 mm/5” width, which is probably a reasonable compromise for 19 mm radiata pine*. The four-part (two + two) moulds will be butt-strapped together.


    Working out a rough shape for the Station 1 mould by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Stacks of pine shlving 19 mm (3/4”) timber. The long boards have just been dug out from the back of the shed, after I found that they were relatively flat.


    Stacks of mould timber by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Assigned mould timbers. There are sets for stations 1 and 7 (two sides), plus upper and/or lower bits and pieces for other stations, after making some measurements from the upper diagonals. Station 1 will be done in one piece; station 7 was originally going to be done in one piece but may yet be done in two - I haven't made up my mind about that yet.


    Assigned mould timbers by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    That brings me up to date. I haven't been able to get up tho the workshop today because of other commitments, possibly tomorrow and definitely Friday.

    I have decided to skip the antistatic wiring in the tablesaw setup as there isn’t enough throughput to create a static discharge danger - in my opinion, at any rate.

    Alex.

    *Note: on further pondering, I am going to increase the width of Stations 1 and 7 half-moulds, to allow for the high tensions at the stem ends. I want one of the critical regions - the join between the mould halves - to be longer to better support the pressures involved. In fact, solid moulds at the stations would be even safer. Some biscuit-jointing along the long edges of some pine boards may be on the cards. Or, wider half-moulds with significant cross-pieces, bolted, not screwed. Hmm.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-06-2019 at 06:02 PM. Reason: Added note
    You can never have too many clamps

  7. #182
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I’m spending most of the day up at the nascent workshop today, since I’m up here getting the car serviced. Tomorrow is going to be a complete washout, too, with an early start for an all-day RFS event.

    I forgot that I’d also seen the nail-head trick on page one of Ian (Milne)’s Kotik, Kotik, Kotik! thread.

    In one of his posts before the post linked to above, Ian shows his building frame. I may copy his method of tying its feet tegether with crosspieces (needed, no doubt as the Kotik is a larger and heavier boat), but I will definitely be running crosspieces at all mould stations. This is because the greater proportion of the 42 x 42 mm meranti that I bought (from the only place that I could find it) is bowed in one plane, and I want to ensure that the sreaders are straight. This is especially neded, I think, given my pine-shelving four-part moulds.

    Anyway, today’s project is to sort out the thicknesser trolley.
    You can never have too many clamps

  8. #183
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Looking good Alex. Nice to see some lofting happening also. All of your prep work will pay off big-time once you start the build.
    Following along with interest.
    PeterW

  9. #184
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    A minor point, Alex, but to save yourself some grief, back in post #177, you'll find that you'll need 2 nails in each of the 2 lines that define the top and side of the keel. The single nail heads just aren't long or accurate enough, once you have transferred them to the pine, to get straight enough lines.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  10. #185
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWidders View Post
    Looking good Alex. Nice to see some lofting happening also. All of your prep work will pay off big-time once you start the build.
    Following along with interest.
    Hello Peter, thank you very much for your kind words. I'm hoping that all the organisation works as intended: I spent half an hour looking for tools that weren't lying about yet weren't back on their pegbord, where they were supposed to be. I finally found them in the cupboard where they used to live; force o-' habit...

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    A minor point, Alex, but to save yourself some grief, back in post #177, you'll find that you'll need 2 nails in each of the 2 lines that define the top and side of the keel. The single nail heads just aren't long or accurate enough, once you have transferred them to the pine, to get straight enough lines.
    Thank you very much for your advice, Alex. I'll follow it once I put the nails back in place; I took them off to fiddle about with the mould widths.

    I got a reasonable amount of headway with the thicknesser trolley on Friday, although it was brought to a halt when I had to go and catch a train to pick up the car in mid arvo.

    1. I used the square to mark the cutting lines at the same length. Ha ha. I thought that the marks were all the same, but I didn’t check, did I?


    I used the square to mark the cutting lines at the same length by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. So far so good...but there just has to be a ‘but’, doesn’t there?


    So far so good... by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. All four legs shortened. Spot the 'but'.


    All four legs shortened by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Here's the 'but':


    There’s always a ‘but’... by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Measure twice, cut once...


    Measure twice, cut once... by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. The ‘missing’ piece. Not on the right way yet, but it was by the time that I glued it in place.


    The ‘missing’ piece by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    More photos in a while.
    You can never have too many clamps

  11. #186
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    More photos from the other day:

    1. Epoxy glue added to the table leg offcut. Neat epoxy end-grain primer applied earlier to both surfaces of the affected leg. Note the nitrile glove(s) that I am trying out. The intermediate size that would have been a better fit was out of stock.


    Epoxy glue added to the table leg offcut by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. On all four legs, and no strange wobbles now(!).


    On all four legs, and no strange wobbles now by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. The top has been put on a diet. The two removed pieces can be seen to the side.


    The top has been put on a diet by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. The newly-installed dust hood has to go! It's in the way, but I didn’t quite expect that it would be this soon.


    The newly-installed dust hood has to go by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Gone! I can use the fence as well! The rather dangerous splitter was the next item to be removed.


    Gone! I can use the fence as well! by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Table spacers/supports cut. I didn’t have the right screws to fasten the spacers onto the top, so I switched my attention to the castor base.


    Spacers cut by Alex1N, on Flickr.
    You can never have too many clamps

  12. #187
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Coming together Alex! I wondered if that dust collection was going to be a problem Work fine for ripping, probably, but for panel cuts...not so much? I'm facing the same situation in my shop and am thinking of building a swivelling overhead "crane" to support a dust collector. Still experimenting, but have much to do before I get there

  13. #188
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Hugh, yes, it's getting there. Once this is out of the way, it will be on to two Manning benches and their trestles. In fairness to the designers of the dust extractor, the instructions show an overhead alternative for the gantry - which, sadly, I can't employ because of the space-gobbling garage doors. I can't really justify replacing said doors since they are both working perfectly well. If one or both were broken, however, that would be a different story.

    1. Starting to round over the corners, beginning with a 45° cut.


    Starting to round over the corners by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Angles halved. Note the Perma-Grit block.


    Angles halved by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Rounding complete. Note the locate outline of the table leg.


    Rounding complete by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Bosch palm router - very nifty. 3 mm (1/8") roundover bit used. The black thing leaning against the Perma-Grit block in the background is another Perma-Grit tool (with replaceable plates).


    Bosch palm router - very nifty by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Rounded corners and edges. That will reduce the likelihood of cuts and gouges from the castor base when I happen to bump into it. I will run some reinforcing epoxy around the edges at some point.


    Rounded corners and edges by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Trolley sitting on its new castor base; castors and cross-bracing are next.


    Trolley sitting on its new castor base by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Slowly, slowly, step by step. Well, not all that slow, in actual fact.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-19-2019 at 05:34 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  14. #189
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    OK, more Materials and Methods, with interspersed Results, and occasional Discussions.

    1. Castor bolt spacing template. I ended up drawing in a location cross centred on the intersecting diagonals (castor mounting plate centre).


    Castor bolt spacing template by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Checking the template against the castor mounting plate. The scriber at the top of the photo was used to mark the pilot locations for the 10 mm brad-point bit.


    Checking the template against the castor mounting plate by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Alignment marks for the template. The cross on the template (not shown) aligned with these. Apologies for the appallingly bad focus - and this was the better of the two snaps!


    Alignment marks for the template by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Checking the scriber marks made using the template. Note the locking pedal.


    Checking the scriber marks made using the template by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Castor test-mounted.


    Test mount by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Four castors temporarily in place. A four-wheeled omnidirectional skateboard! NOT recommended for that purpose!


    Four castors temporarily in place by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    The hole template was sufficiently accurate to afford moderately accurate drilling using a 10 mm wood bit. Keeping the drill bit vertical in two planes over sixteen holes without using the drill press was a bit of a challenge. A couple of holes were a bit off, but were still amenable to the use of a hammer. Ahem.

    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  15. #190
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I posted a couple of these photos via Tapatalk on the 'Antipodean Boats Connection' thread here on WBF, yesterday.

    1. The table legs sit in between each rectangle of bolts. All castors are locking.


    The table legs sit in between each rectangle of bolts by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. The castor base trundles about very nicely indeed. A bit too nicely, in fact! It will slow down once the trolley is complete, it has the thicknesser on it, and the castors are locked.


    The castor base trundles about very nicely by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Table in position on castor base...


    Table in position on castor base by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. ...and the castor base attached to table with 75 mm screws into the legs. Once the castors were removed, of course. I pre-drilled through the legs' centre-pops (see above for the locator in the centre of the card template) on the top of the base to more accurately locate the screws.


    Castor base attached to table with 75 mm screws into the legs by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Spacer/support boards attached to tabletop with 20 mm screws.


    Spacer/support boards attached to tabletop with 20 mm screws by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Mockup of the thicknesser trolley. The bracing pieces need to be cut to length and added, next - without the tabletop in place. The top is held in place (after painstaking measuring) with two diagonally-opposed angle brackets.


    Mockup of the thicknesser trolley by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    That's as far as I got yesterday arvo. I had planned to have the top screwed down by that stage, but the bracing needs to be added first so that didn't happen. I got the location of the top right though (within a millimetre or so in any direction). The bracing will hopefully allow me to add the 12" disc sander to the trolley as well - there's room. I've had this latter addition in mind from very early on, but we'll see how the pudding turns out.

    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-10-2019 at 09:49 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  16. #191
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Looks nice, Alex! I have most of the tools in my shop on rollers as well. I just don't have the room for specialized workstations. Would love to, but...
    On the overhead crane you might think about a drop that comes to just below the doors and the air filter. A 360 degree swivel arm that could at least support the dust collector hose high when you need it? That's kinda what I'm going to have to do, but it'll be post mounted. I'll hoist the collector tube up to it when I need it and run it elsewhere whenever it's needed. My thickness sander needs overhead collection and I was thinking about a tablesaw top collector like you have.

  17. #192
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Hugh, here's a snap from a page of the instruction booklet:

    1. Dust extraction hood gantry, ceiling mounted version. I have all the parts for that modification (minus the ducting, of course), as they came in the kit - just not the readily-available ceiling. I could move the saw to the back of the workshop but there wouldn't be room to cut anything of appreciable length, and it would also be in the way of other things. On the other hand, it doesn't have to be on the RHS of the sawblade: and it would be entirely possible to modify the gantry so that it fits up next tor the sides of the air filter box. Adding a rotating arm as you suggest would help a lot, although if the main structure were to be installed next to the air filter, it wold need to be a rather long arm. Hmm...


    Dust extraction hood gantry, ceiling mounted version by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Changes to Station 1 element width, etc. Note the added cross-piece; I am now considering making Stations 1 and 7 out of solid board, however...


    Changes to Station 1 element width, etc. by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Accordingly, we have this: a test layout for a solid Station 7 mould. The boards were arranged to avoid knots on the actual mould outline.


    Test layout for solid Station 7 mould by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Or this version, which has a similar knot arrangement to that in the preceding photo, but is one piece of board less, and possibly stronger. The boards would be glued together with epoxy.


    Another version of the solid mould layout by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Acting on Mr Zimm's suggestion about the keelson cutouts, I extended a number of their outlines. I will just have to remember to increase the line widths slight, as they are a bit thin and some are in the centres of the original lines.


    Keelson cross-section line extensions for moulds-transfers by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Table of ‘quarter’-mould lengths, in inches, scribbled down on a convenient spot on the lofting board. This is intended to help in working out which shelf pieces to assign to which mould. The lenghts are going to need to be increased as they are only the lengths of the mould outlines, and don't take into account the extra timber needed at each end of each piece to account for fastening.


    Table of ‘quarter’-mould lengths, in inches by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Having something of a disturbed week this week for a variety of unrelated reasons, I won't have much of an opportunity to get up to Wentworth Falls, so I am doing some work on the moulds preparation - which, it has to be said, needs to be done sooner rather than later!

    I'm still drooling over the photos of Ian Milne's Kotik launch of the other day, too. Congratulations Ian - may you have fair winds and fair weather for her!

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  18. #193
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I’m hoping to get back up to the workshop today - there’s still quite a bit to do on the thicknesser trolley. This post is a sort of ‘recent purchases’ one, via the pad and the nifty little Logitech Bluetooth keyboard that I don’t use nearly enough. Because it has the usual keyboard shortcuts of a (mac) dektop buit in, it makes iPad editing SO much easier, and deals with the awful Flickr/iPad intermittent non-interaction when selecting URLs.

    1. Latest acquisition - new 18V brushless drill-driver set: (hammer) drill, impact driver, rapid charger with fan and two 5.0 Ah batteries. I am going to have to do some practise with these, as they are much more aggresive than the NiCd-battery brushed-motor drills that I am using at the moment. The small impact driver may in fact be small enough to fit into the gap between the castor base abd the lower fframe of the table, allowing me to install the intended brackets more easily. But we shall see - I haven’t been to the workshop since I got the new drill kit.


    Latest acquisition - new drill-driver set by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Ratchet strap with handy excess strap takeup spool. One from a pack of four, bought at the same time as the Makita set. The new straps might encourage me to take the ‘Duck around the corner (literally) to Wentworth Falls Lake occasionally (kayaks, canoes, sailing and rowing boats allowed!).


    Ratchet strap with handy excess strap takeup spool by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. New ear-muffs, and a couple of boxes of nitrile gloves from the same source (Signet.com.au). The drawing compass (Staedtler, made in Germany) on the right-had side came from the local newsagent - I saw it and pounced!


    New ear-muffs by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Heavy-duty ear-muffs. Threse really are very good - a great improvement over their (also 3M) predecessors.


    Heavy-duty ear-muffs by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. The marked improvement in sound-deadening is a reflected in their very good hearing-protection rating.

    Good hearing-protection rating by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Two 3 mm sheets of MDF, one of them cut in half for me. The easier-to-handle half-sheets are for making mould patterns; the full sheet will go over the other side of the board for the stems.


    Two 3 mm sheets of MDF, one cut in two by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    This last purchase may surprise some people - especially Mr Milne - given my long-term loathing of MDF (it is a magnet for some particularly toxic species of fungi, quite fragile, etc., etc.). Well, the two half-sheet pieces are for making templates via the nail-head-impression process (the uniformly soft nature of the stuff may be an advantage here, in fact). These can be checked directly against the lofted mould shapes for shape, once cut out and trimmed. I got this idea from Ian’s Kotik Kotik, Kotik! thread, see this post here.

    The second sheet will be screwed down on the other (stems) side of the lofting board and probably given one or two coats of the flat white house paint used on the plywood. Why? The rough surface of the painted but unsanded plywood eventually started to annoy me, and the final straw was the appearance of the board in the close-up photo of the ‘moulds parts’ table appearing at the end of my previous post. Call me overly fussy if you like! Autumn seems to be finally settling in (for the moment at least), which will make the painting easier - and the drying slower.

    That’s it for the moment. Hopefully, by the time I make another post, I will have the thicknesser trolley finished!
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-15-2019 at 09:52 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  19. #194
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    280

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    This is the first of the two last posts solely on the thicknesser trolley.

    1. Extra height-adjusting blocks. This brings the finished height of the trolley up to that of the tablesaw and Triton, although the bed height of the thicknesser is obviously going to be heigher than that. Hopefully this is the last time that I have to remove the castors.


    Extra height-adjusting blocks by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Starting the addition of the braces; screwed in place and the clamps removed. The bracing pieces have been used for concreting form-work bracing (hence the ‘floor’ label), the building frame for the ‘Duck - and now bracing for the thicknesser trolley..


    Starting the addition of the braces by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Second brace, clamped in place, no screws yet.


    Second brace by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Third and longest brace, partially fastened to the table legs and the ends of the side braces.


    Third and longest brace by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Overview of the braced thicknesser table. That was where I had to leave it at the end of the session. The rear brace will be trimmed, next.


    by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. "There is no Photo Six."*


    Continued in next post...


    * With apologies to Monty Python.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-17-2019 at 07:01 PM. Reason: Adedd stuff
    You can never have too many clamps

  20. #195
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    280

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I thought that I'd pressed the 'post' button, but most likely it was 'preview', because my last post has vanished into thin air. I was in a bit of a hurry at the time.

    Here is yesterday's (second) post, today - more or less:

    1. Eight angle brackets added to tie the legs onto the castor base more securely. I ended up using the scriber and the stubby Philips-head screwdriver to put the 20mm screw in on the castor base legs of the brackets - the small impact driver was too big. I did use it as a torch so that I could get the scriber marks [more or less) in the right places. The hammer was needed to get the screws securely into the tough outer surface of the form-ply - even with the scriber holes.


    Eight angle brackets added to tie the legs onto the castor base more securely by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Braces all trimmed, and table top firmly secured onto the table with a large number of 60 mm screws, and four 75 mm screws down into the legs


    Braces all trimmed, and table top firmly secured onto the table with a large number of 60 mm screws by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. View of the rear of the trolley. Showing the trimmed rear brace. You can also see the pencil lines for the screws, if you look closely. Note that the top is the wrong way round, not that it matters.


    View of the rear of the trolley by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Thicknesser in place on its new trolley. I may eventually bolt it down for safety - that will be a bit of a challenge (although I think that I have worked out an easy method of doing that without having to remove the top).


    Thicknesser in place on its new trolley by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. 12” disc sander in place on the trolley, for fit. I’ll see how they go together in use. In theory, they one shouldn’t obstruct the use of the other, since the combined weight is easy enough to move around. The front 'ramp' of the thicknesser is down in its working position, temporarily. I will move the thicknesser further towards the rear and bring the sander a bit further towards the front, since I want the weight of the thicknesser more over the top of the right-hand diagonal. Switching sides is not on since the thicknesser's dust port would be obstructed by the sander in that arrangement.


    12” disc sander in place on the trolley, for fit by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Thicknesser trundled out of the way for the time being. It is extremely easy to move about, and I am very pleased with how it has turned out. I still need to round the corners and edges of the table top yet, similar to the the way that I did the castor base.


    Thicknesser trundled out of the way for the time being. by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I spent a reasonable proportion of yesterday scampering around trying to find suitable pine boards for the Manning bench trestles, of which more in a later post. Today is going to be taken up with mostly non-boat-or-shed-related things.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-18-2019 at 06:19 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  21. #196
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    280

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    These are mostly the results of my shopping expedition(s) yesterday.

    1. Two lengths of end-threaded 20 mm galvanised water-pipe. Guess what they're for? Note also two lengths of 90 x 18 mm meranti tucked up against the 3 mm MDF sheets - for a related purpose.


    Two lengths of end-threaded 20 mm galvanised water-pipe. by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Replacement part for the Carbatec planer - it arrived in the mail yesterday morning; it connects the fence assembly to the planer table. The existing part has a stripped thread on the left where it attaches the fence assembly to the fence-adjustment assembly and the adjuster-to-table bracket.


    Replacement part for the Carbatec planer by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. 10 mm galvanised bolts. For securing various tools, including the thicknesser to its trolley top. The shorter (75 mm) bolts were too short and the longer (150 mm) were too long. Oh well.


    10 mm galvanised bolts by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Compare and contrast: today's version. Eight 10 x 120 mm galvanised bolts; these should be ‘almost just right’ for both the thicknesser, and the 6” Record or Dawn vice that I am moving to another bench (but very near where it used to be).


    Eight 10 x 120 mm galvanised bolts by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. 240 x 45 mm pine boards for Manning bench trestles.- four x 2.1 m. 920 mm of one board will be used as the extension to the forward end of the building frame - and I get to avoid glueing together two thinner pieces of pine into the bargain. The actual benches themselves, or 'anvils', will be constructed form LVLs (240 x 42 mm) built for the purpose. I am a bit ambivalent about LVLs - my opinion of them as a boat-building material, is to not use them (e.g., in a cabin, and in any case they would be too heavy): they delaminate almost instantly when wet, and would need a thorough, perpetually undisturbed, triple-coating of epoxy, plus multiple coats of epoxy high-build primer, plus...


    240 x 45 mm pine boards for Manning bench trestles by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Rounded-over corner of thicknesser trolley top - x four. I'll be doing a bit of fiddling around with it yet.


    Rounded-over corner of thicknesser trolley top. by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 03-20-2019 at 05:13 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  22. #197
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Providence, RI USA
    Posts
    1,458

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Black pipe must be for your clamps, am I right? At work, we call this area the "clamp shack."

    I built some (crude) manning benches after seeing them on the Geoff Kerr CY build videos. I built the open boxes to go on top too, in order to make them taller.
    Built a whole boat with 'em.

    4-side mast.jpg

    cuttingplanks.jpg

    I also made two skinnier, lighter sawhorses the same height as the benches without their tops. In the above photo, in the middle is a horrible, hacked together horse that I did use just for planking layout. It was put out of its misery shortly thereafter.

    I bet with two manning benches and two sawhorses all the same height, you could even lay out planking for a Sooty Tern!
    Here's a shot from this AM.
    benches and horse.jpg

    Good luck!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  23. #198
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,509

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Looking great! I'd never seen the Manning benches with boxes like that. I think I see some in my future. but I'll have to make them collapsible for storage.

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