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Thread: Sooty Tern No. 93

  1. #1
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    Default Sooty Tern No. 93

    After a long hiatus since receiving the plans for my Sooty Tern from Stray Dog Boatworks (over two and a half years), I am finally setting up to start work on her. What was going to be a Tammie Norrie became, after discussions with Robert Ayliffe (SDB) and Iain Oughtred, an Oughtred double-ender, then crystallised finally into a Sooty Tern.

    Not long after sending off for the plans, I searched the Wooden Boat Forum and found that Sooty Terns were almost as common as mice! I found threads by James McMullen, IanMilne, Max F, Vernon, EeBe4, Bassbug, and JCR1: invaluable resources for me, as well as happily confirming my decision on the Sooty. I also joined Off-Center Harbor for Geoff Kerr's 42-episode video series on building a Caledonia Yawl.

    I am not sure that I can actually contribute much to the sum of knowledge about building a Sooty Tern, especially with the standard of the work done by those mentioned above. A blow-by-blow account probably isn’t going to be the best approach, especially since such things usually end up slowing me down significantly (I have already spent more than enough time on this first post already - this is the third draft and I still had to chop). So I may simply use this thread for occasional milestone-reporting and to ask the odd question.


    Here’s a summary of what I intend to do with the construction, and where I am at at the moment:

    The boat will be built in a sail-and-oar configuration, but not quite to the extent of Mr McMullen's. I have, however, taken careful note of his analyses in his ‘Everything Wrong with Rowan’ thread (see above) plus his replies to my PMs.

    The building space will be a moderately-sized domestic garage. Early on, I made up a full-sized layout of centreline and station offsets on a (large) number of glued-together pieces of butcher's paper to check that the boat will: 1., fit comfortably in the garage while being built; and 2., be able to be easily extracted from it once it's finished.

    I intended building the hull from three 9mm okoume plywood (lower) strakes and three 6 mm meranti (upper) strakes, but for stiffness decided to do the whole thing in 9 mm. Seven sheets (one extra for inevitable mistakes) of Bruynzeel 9 mm okoume 'Lloyds-certified' marine plywood were ordered from Denman Marine. I checked the sheets on delivery, and all looked fine - no visible voids on sheet edges, delaminations, etc. Both Bruynzeel and Denman Marine, after all, have very good reputations to protect. Some 6 mm meranti plywood may be used as well, e.g., for the centreboard case; decks and bulkheads (with cleats) will still be 9 mm. Stems and aprons will be laminated from Douglas fir, with keelson/keel/skeg also from Douglas fir, but not laminated.

    The building frame will be made out of three lengths of 150 mm (6") x 42 mm (1-5/8") x 6 metre (19’ 8”) LVLs, since these are engineered straight and square. Two lengths will be used for the long sides; the third will be chopped up to make ladder-rungs and legs. These are yet to be acquired.

    Moulds will be made from 12 mm (1/2") ‘CD’-grade structural plywood; three sheets of 3.6 mm (9/64") interior grade meranti plywood were bought for making plank patterns. Most other scantlings will be Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menzresii - I have had extensive training in biological taxonomy and can’t help myself), with some other softwood and hardwood bits and pieces from my own exisiting stores. Some of the Douglas fir, and possibly some Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), will be bought from a local specialist timber merchant (Trend Timbers), who can guarantee clear and reasonably long lengths. Most of my own Douglas fir stocks will need to be mostly scarfed if used in lengths longer than about a metre (39").

    I will be adding the Caledonia Yawl boomkin, anchored on the afterdeck (again, see Mr McMullen’s Rowan), and will make my own oars from Sitka spruce or Douglas fir - I have Mr Oughtred’s plans for these, too. There is a group of Australian trees known as ‘Silver Ash’ (several Flindersia species, which is why you can never really trust common plant names) whose wood I will investigate, too. The rig will be the standard Sooty Tern lug yawl rig (balance lug main, smaller sprit-boomed mizzen), mast and spars from Douglas fir and/or Sitka spruce; and the tiller will be the Norwegian type, per kind favour of Mr Oughtred.

    Side-bench wood is yet to be decided on, and the height will probably be at that shown on the Arctic Tern Construction Plans I sheet for the open boat configuration, which shows them set level with the top of the upper centreboard case frame (and just at the lowest part of the internal lower sheerstrake curve), about 80 mm or 3 3/8” higher than the decked option (Construction Plan II). This will require an upwards extension of the bench supports, to maintain the 85-ish mm overlap with the floors (yet again, see the ‘Everything Wrong with Rowan’ link(s) above).

    Epoxy will be WEST Systems' 105/205-206-207, 401 Microfibre Blend powder for glueing, 407 and/or 410 fairing fillers and 423 graphite powder (possibly).

    Following the design, permanent fasteners will be bronze, and embedded in epoxy. Pad-eyes may be installed for lifting purposes (again, see the Rowan repair thread). A shouldered galvanised eyebolt for towing will be set in the forward stem (see the later Geoff Kerr videos mentioned above). A fluid-filled globe compass may be installed in the face of one of the two buoyancy tank bulkheads. Also, a suitable bilge pump, port covers for the two decks (per recommendation from Mr McMullen), and 3M 5200 compound for bedding the centreboard case. Silicone sealant will be avoided like the Plague. I am also collecting pieces of lead for bilge ballast blocks and centreboard counterweight: I am not a particularly heavy person, and are my intended crew members aren’t either.

    Current work:
    Setting up to loft the Sooty Tern stem shapes, with quadruple-checking;
    Going over the mould shapes and their relationship to the 9 mm-3/8" planking (the plans are drawn up for 6 mm-1/4");
    Re-reading the plans, on which eight (ten) sheets there is a wealth of highly detailed information that has to be digested;
    Chasing up prices of various items from suppliers;
    Choosing an external house colour so that the painters can finish and I can get my workshop back!

    I would very much like to thank the WBF Web Admin, who went went out of his or her way to fix a problem that was preventing me from logging into the Forum. Whoever you are, thank you very much indeed! And also for the almost total absence of 'likes' (except for 'rate this thread) - what a relief!

    Well, that will more than do me for the present, and be more than enough for anyone else too, I don't doubt. In fact, I rabbitted on so long that I hit the 10000 char limit and there wasn't room for snaps: maybe next time.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 11-01-2018 at 09:23 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Welcome to the ranks of Oughtred boatbuidlers. I finished a Whilly Tern in Jan, 2018 (also on this forum).
    Your planning/thinking sounds pretty good to me.
    Only suggestion I would have is to see if you can hold out for a bronze towing eye. You may complement this with bronze rudder gudgeons and pintles if the budget allows.
    Looking forward to the build.
    Good luck with the process...and plenty of pics please.
    Cheers
    PeterW

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Peter,

    Welcome to my thread . You're the first, congratulations! Thank you very much for your own welcome. I will have a look for your Whilly Tern (congratulations again!) and add it to my reading list.

    I'm not sure about plenty of snaps, however - see above regarding them slowing me down.

    I knew that I'd forgotten at least one thing (well, specific mention, it was implied by the 'fittings' category) - bronze gudgeons and pintles. I have done a cursory search: I've found some in the Davey catalogue, and on Toplicht.de. The best ones appear to be those mentioned in Geoff Kerr's videos: but the catch is that the maker, who makes them specifically for the Caledonia Yawl, has NO internet presence whatsoever. I will have to communicate via letter if I want a set (I am not going to ring him). Or I will make my own gudgeons, at least.

    I will keep an eye open for a bronze eyebolt as well: I have yet to search Toplicht for any. Update - Toplicht does have them: in galv. and stainless steel, brass and bronze. They have a nice shouldered bronze one at 18 mm hole diameter with M12 thread, here. The shoulder, unfortunately, is 50 mm diameter, so way too big for the elegant 20 mm Sooty stem. These look more suitable - or rather, the 13 mm, 1/2" one might.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-08-2018 at 02:20 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Awesome boat! You won't be disappointed. UNA is a racehorse. Love her-
    EB
    My Sooty and other boats: https://lingeringlunacy.com/

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello EB, welcome to the thread and thank you for reading! I am looking forward to both building, sailing and rowing her! I have a tentative name for her too, but superstition is preventing me from announcing it to all and sundry; the last boat that I named before building (Michael Storer's Goat Island Skiff) hasn't been started yet.

    I have a lot to measure up to with you and all the other efforts that I've seen here (not just Sooty Terns, either), so I'm a bit nervous and twitchy.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Here's some snaps that didn't make it into my first post, because I was too verbose as usual, and ran into the post editor's character limit. Please excuse the Flickr/Yahoo* Lawyer Pacifier format (and don't click on the images - talk about links-to-Flickr spam!). I do this to avoid getting website owners and/or site administrators in trouble from said lawyers. Also, please let me know if the image size is too large, and I will shrink it.

    *Yahoo! is now owned by someone else, HOORAY!

    1. Garage before new mezzanine installed, including failing original mezzanine structure on the right. Oz Racer (PDR No. 303) Wood Duck on trailer on the left:


    Cleared. Garage space not quite ready for building a boat by Alex1N, on Flickr


    2. Setting up an overview of hull outline to see if there is enough room to build the Sooty Tern with the planned new heavy-duty mezzanine structure:


    Eighteen pieces of 'butcher's' paper by Alex1N, on Flickr


    3. It'll fit!


    Overall view of the Sooty Tern outline pattern again by Alex1N, on Flickr


    4. Closer-up view of the bow end; chalked 'X' marks a possible location of the bow stem at building frame end/forward perpendicular. Wood Duck has been evicted, temporarily...


    Closer-up view of bow offsets by Alex1N, on Flickr


    5. Garage with new mezzanine - and the wood collection has been moved up off the floor at last!


    New mezzanine, left hand part
    by Alex1N, on Flickr



    6. RH part of wood store. A good deal of my collection is assiduously collected Douglas fir/oregon - of varying quality...


    New mezzanine, right hand part by Alex1N, on Flickr


    I have rediscovered the Forum's per-post image limit, too (six, including emoticons), so more in a bit...
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-09-2018 at 12:06 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Continued...

    7. Newly-arrived plywood pack from Denman Marine: seven sheets of Bruynzeel 9 mm okoume/gaboon marine plywood


    Seven sheets of 9 mm Bruynzeel okoume plywood from Denman Marine by Alex1N, on Flickr



    8. Bruynzeel 'imprimatur'...


    Brunyzeel imprimatur by Alex1N, on Flickr



    9. Sheet dimensions: 2500 x 1200. You get a bit extra, especially compared with Australia's 2400 x 1200 'Standard' >grumble<


    Plywood sheet dimensions and date of manufacture by Alex1N, on Flickr



    10. Unpacking...


    Restacking plywood sheets after checking by Alex1N, on Flickr



    11. Nice surface veneer - it's a pity that I now loathe bright finishing...


    Restacked sheets; protective mdf shipping sheet (one of two) on floor by Alex1N, on Flickr



    12. Sheet edges on one corner

    Close-up of edges/corner of the seven okoume plywood sheets
    by Alex1N, on Flickr


    ...and a few more to come...
    You can never have too many clamps

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Continued again...

    13. Three sheets of 'CD'-grade structural plywood for the moulds. A bit cupped, unfortunately, so will have to be battened, and there goes any convenient crawl-through holes to facilitate cleanup of epoxy squeeze-out


    Three 12 mm sheets of CD structural plywood, from Penrith Mr Ply&Wood. by Alex1N, on Flickr



    14. Mould-sheet edges: look OK here, but there was a bit of a void all along the outer veneer of one long edge on one of the sheets. Since it is just the moulds, that doesn't matter so much...


    Close-up of of edges/corners of three 12 mm plywood sheets by Alex1N, on Flickr



    15. Three sheets of 3.6 (9/64") meranti plywood for the making the plank-templates


    Three sheets of 3.6 mm luaun/meranti/Pacific maple plywood for plank templates by Alex1N, on Flickr



    16. Pondering the moulds and stems plans. There's also the Arctic Tern lines plan on the RH side. Note that the junk-heap that they are in is my workshop at home (which has sadly become a 'storage facility' for all sorts of old rubbish) - the boat is actually being built further up the Mountains. Quite a bit further up (35 kilometres or so). I will be marking up the moulds and cutting them up here, then transporting them up the hill in my old small Mazda 'people-mover' (it does the job though, and I have resisted it being replaced for years!).


    Starting work on the moulds and stems by Alex1N, on Flickr



    17. Aaaargh! I have an infestation of painters! A dratted nuisance! Even the Oz Racer is back in there! I won't be able to do anything until at very least the outside of the garage is painted (at least the insides aren’t being painted) - and that means the Boss choosing a colour that she approves of; so far, none. And I think that we have had a dozen samples put up so far. On the other hand, I still have moulds to lay out and stems to loft - and patience is a virtue...


    Temporary delay while the outside of the house gets painted
    by Alex1N, on Flickr


    That's all the snaps that I have on this project at the moment - and all the work that has been done on it, besides. Next on the agenda is marking out the mould patterns on the 12 mm plywood sheets, and lofting the stems. I have the new marks in place for the bow, but not the stern. I brought some likely pieces of ripped timber offcuts back from my father-in-law's yesterday, with the hope that one of them at least will act as a stem-lofting batten. Only one candidate was (just) suitable. Since I am building the stretched stretched version of the Sooty (29.5" 'twixt stations, as opposed to the 29" of the other option given in the plans), I have been drawing in various critical points (stations and compartment 2 thirds-markers) half an inch each to the left. That makes a boat-length of exactly 20 feet 96.10 metres), not 19 feet 8 inches.

    I have so far forgotten to mention that I have Mr Oughtred's 'Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual' (it was there in the first draft) and have read it several times. I also have his printed catalogue, which was very useful when selecting a boat design.

    So there you have it - up to date. I now have an enormous amount of gardening to do "Or Else!"...
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-10-2018 at 07:21 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    See what I mean? I start a thread, then I can't help myself and everything else goes to wrack and ruin.

    I have been pondering tools and wood. Rabbet planes are now either ridiculously expensive, or just not available, depending on where I've looked. The best that I can afford is a German bullnose plane for about $100 plus postage. I have also been pricing electric planers and am really of the opinion that I should stick to my jack and other planes instead.

    My usual supplier of WEST epoxy isn't responding to emails, so I will ring them up tomorrow. I might have to sack them in favour of Carbatec, or go back to Bote-Cote.

    Trend Timbers have informed me that they don't currently have a supplier for Sitka spruce, although their website says 'usually stocked'. I have sent them another email asking if the have Sliver Ash and rock maple in stock or at least can get it in. I am not holding my breath about either of these latter items.

    There is some rough-sawn Australian Red Cedar to hand in my collection, and I am wondering if it would be suitable for side benches and thwarts. Probably too soft for the thwart knees. Any comments?

    I have been reading slowly through PeterWidders' Whilly Tern thread, which has reminded me to look back through PeterSibley's 'JIM' thread, which I have subscribed to but naughtily forgotten about. Both excellent and highly useful to my purpose.

    A.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-09-2018 at 05:20 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Reading through Mr Widders' Whilly Tern thread - what a boat, I really wish that I hadn't started this thread now! - reminds me that I too have a number of floorboards - in the very literal sense - that I might be able to use as bottom boards on the Sooty. These came from our old joint on the other side o' town, when we had the entire ground floor covered by Sydney Flooring using Turpentine (Syncarpia glomulifera).

    This widely-distributed tree grows natively around these regions. The boards are profiled underneath (recessed by about 2 mm), and T&G, of course. They really came up a treat with a nice coating. I wish that we could have brought the floor with us, but I brought all the leftover planks plus all the offcuts with me (they live in my wood heap up at my father-in-law's place, mostly in the mezzanine in the garage (see above)). Possibly a bit stiff for the curve of the hull, but I'll check that out in due course. The wood would certainly stand up to being kicked about with boating shoes.

    I am wondering, following further reading of the Whilly tern thread, where Mr Widders might have acquired the nice bronze gudgeons and pintles that he put on Muckle Mootie (I did look for a Gaelic name for my boat, but the English one is funnier. If you find that sort of thing funny, that is.

    OK, that's enough out of me, the washing up beckons.

    A.
    You can never have too many clamps

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Welcome to the forum! You will find much encouragement here, and valuable help along the way. I am in the very early stages of building the Tammie Norrie. Love the designs of Iain,(obviously I guess!)and I'm committed to enjoying the process. And I've discovered that many times life(painting, etc.)gets in the way of boat time! But depending on interruptions, it appears we may be at least to some extent on the same time-table, so I will be following with interest. Enjoy!

    Ken

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Ken, welcome to my thread . And thank you for your welcome, too. I have been about the place a for a bit, but this is my first thread here that will have any substance. I’ll follow along with your Tammie Norrie if that’s all right - I love the Tammie!

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Subscribed!
    I found your thread '"Really Simple Sails" for Wood Duck'. That's high-quality woodwork. An excellent apprenticeship in lug sails too. Sooty Tern 93 is going to be one of the best!
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hi Alex. Many thanks for your kind words about the Whilly Tern build. I'm sure your build will come up very nicely also. Keep the pics coming.
    I will send you a pm with some supplier details.
    Cheers
    PeterW

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Ian, welcome aboard!

    Um, so no pressure regarding my build, eh?

    I really need to get Wood Duck out on the local pond (Wentworth Falls Lake), but I’m wary of starting a trend ; ).

    Yesterday evening, I started reading falcon1’s Whilly Boat build in Prov. RI thread,* excellent work here, too! He even has a ‘Mr Snappy’. More of Mr Snappy later - he was my long-suffering assistant throughout the ‘Duck build. But I digress. The sight of Mr Falcon’s(?) shiny new Powermatic 14” bandsaw** got me pondering yet again about my upcoming Tool Purchasing Program (I should warn readers that I became notorious on the Oz Woodworkers’ Forum for my constant acquisition of tools and similar gadgets).

    Did I really need a power planer and a new drill driver when I have a perfectly acceptable series of hand planes, including a couple of spokeshaves (flat and convex)? Why not put the money towards a bandsaw? I had planned to aquire one early on in the initial planning stages for the boat (the the point of getting a 15A power line and socket installed for a 3 hp saw), but decided then that I could probably do without. In my various recent readings, including Iain’s Manual, however, I have been noticing that a lot of the tasks that I will be needing to do would be most effectively done with a bandsaw.

    I bought a couple of books on bandsaws over 20 years ago when getting more involved with woodworking again, and even got given a magazine-article series on making your own, for which I got various items (a pillar, and a pair of bearings for the wheels), and taught myself to arc-weld by making a welding bench. An old Hercus (né Southbend) 9.5” lathe was also acquired for the construction, but sadly it is still in lots of small-to-large Lanox-smothered bits. The Wood Duck build, followed not long afterwards by moving not just house but over to the Blue Mountains and - at the time - no workshop, put the final kibosh on it.

    So, here I am, talking myself rapidly into getting a bandsaw. Just don’t mention thicknessers, PLEASE!...

    Cheers,
    Alex.

    * Note to self - REALLY don’t try fancy formatting in forums using the ipad - it will end in tears. I should have remembered the ‘text selection’ woes from the last time(s)...

    ** Amusingly, the very first bandsaw that I found on the Carbatec website was...a Powermatic 14”!
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-09-2018 at 09:45 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Regarding bottom-boards thoughts, I have remembered that I have a large amount of WRC wall cladding from when my study in the old house was converted into a bedroom for our daughter. As well as some WRC shelving (20 mm thick uprights full o' holes unfortunately), the entire room, including the ceiling - was covered in the stuff. In my usual way, of course, I kept the lot. As I did when we had the underneath of the house dug out and converted into what became the Workswamp (a tortuous tale) and I kept all the Jarrah or red-gum or ironbark floor bearers...

    Here's Mr Snappy in the Workswamp, helping with the Boat Roof:

    Say hello to the nice people, Mr Snappy. "Ah, G'Day, owzit goin'!", sez Mr S...


    Mr Snappy looking after the glued-up eye-bolt pads by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    Here he is being looked at by the Dog. Note also the nice Turpentine floorboards...


    The Dog closing in on Mr Snappy by Alex1N, on Flickr



    And here's the welding bench (in the new workshop after removing an enormous amount of rust from the top then coating it in WD-40, and painting the frame with), just for completeness's sake. At this point I had also shortened its six legs and installed six adjustable feet (M12 stainless steel bolts in threaded and tapered blocks):


    Welding bench with both its shelves installed by Alex1N, on Flickr.

    In other news, Fiberglas[sic[ sales got back to me with a resin and other items price loist, and Trend replied re a silver ash/rock maple query: rock maple in stock, silver ash not. Hmmm. it does look as though I will be sticking to Iain's recomendation of using Douglas fir for as much as possible. But I can use some of my Jarrah or whatever it is (I also have some really bits of railway sleeper somewhere on that mezzanine) for cleats...

    Question: where's all the other 'Strines? I know that there is quite a large infestation on here, coz I seen 'em, I 'as. And I haven't as yet had the promised infestation of a whole family of McMullens moving in under my verandah, either - per a comment on one of the Sooty threads - when I finally track the author of said down, I will acknowledge and link him - it sounds like David G but it might be someone else...

    Back to work, it's a reed-tying day today:

    Four oboe reeds tied in a scrambling hurry for use in a reed clinic the other day. And yes, that's an epoxy roller cover, (acquired from Duck Flat Wooden Boats, a couple of years ago)


    Four oboe reeds tied in a hurry by Alex1N, on Flickr



    I wish that the forum software wouldn't convert 'Flickr < br / >' into an emoticon - it takes quite a bit of time to edit it if there's loads o' snaps - and it becomes somewhat annoying, too. Not just in my thread, either. I dare say that I will get used to it, BUT...

    Flickbr />

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-09-2018 at 07:41 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Oh dear.

    I've been doing a bit of organising. No, scratch that, I have been trying to do a bit of organising. Blinkin' 'eck! The trouble is that what I've actually been doing is locating stuff to take up the Mountains, and while most of it was organised, it isn't now!

    WARNING: The following is mostly me thinking aloud - an 'essential' part of my 'organisational' process. (So why do that in public? Why, indeed?)

    This includes all my usable boat-buiilding-ish clamps (I haven't made any Oughtred-type finger clamps yet, but I will do that once I get my little 7" circular saw back down here); measuring, marking, cutting, rasping, planing and sanding tools; my storage box of mostly-CMT router-bit (two bits seem to be missing but may in fact still be in machines, Tut Tut!, naughty Alex: no doubt Mr Snappy will have a word or two to say to me about that!) Mr Snappy, of course. A very brief glance at my epoxy shelves >croak<. My collection of brad-point CMT wood-bits, from 2.5 mm up to 15-16 mm. A WHACKING GREAT hole cutter, bought for cutting holes for buoyancy tank port covers for the 'Duck.

    A quick whizz-around to see if I have left any useful smaller power tools here - the only thing that I found was my epoxy-covered 7.4V drill driver. Yes, I know, it has a low voltage, and it doesn't have a cutting edge Lithium-polymer/-ion battery in it, but I am 'saving up' for a 2 hp bandsaw and a set of useful blades, don't forget. And a rabbet plane. And epoxy. And wood. And... And it's also very useful and I use it all the time and am very loyal to it. I couldn't have built Wood Duck without it (don't forget that in this neck of the woods, wood ducks aren't in fact ducks, they are geese: very small geese with all the bad temper and aggression of the larger sizes (if you upset them, that is; otherwise, they are perfectly peaceful little animals). The one exceptio0n to taking might be the green Bosch 'sanding iron' (it looks exactly like a clothes iron).

    The big JET drill press has to stay here - it is far too heavy to move and I have a nawful el cheapo Chinese rubbish job - wot I bought from Hare and Forbes in an unbridled fit of avarice and learned to regret the rash decision VERY quickly - that I could put back together; most of the bits are up the hill - I think. Or I could organise myself to take parts for drilling home with me at night for drilling on the decent machine.

    A look at the Carbatech 'contractor's saw table and mobile base that, again, was bought for the 'Duck build: this has a heavy cast iron table and wings, and will have to be dismantled completely to be transported. The large-ish (Hafco) 2 hp 4"-port dust collector will similarly need a bit of undoing, but not as much, I hope, as it is considerably lighter. The Triton worktable/DeWalt circular saw and accoutrements are already up the hill ( I have a really ghastly story to tell of that particular machine, but now is not the time).

    And I got six reeds tied on. Bonus prize for the alex! I mention reeds because they are woodworking in miniature. There is a lot of micro-carving with very sharp knives involved - and very little room for error at any stage in the process. Weaselly wee beasties that they are.

    back to something more explicitly Sooty-Tern-ish, here are the lofting battens:

    1. Four lofting-batten candidates. The two on left are Paulownia and oregon left-overs from the 'Duck build; the two on right are odd bits found in the wood heap


    Four lofting-batten candidates by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. The two selected battens. The one on the left is either some eucalpyt or ripped-off tongue from a T&G turpentine floorboard. The left-hand one is the more stable of the two, although not as straight as the much-thinner one


    Two selected battens by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Here's a newly made reed! Last of the batch of six tied on today, RH hollow-ground Graf Oerlikon scraping knife and Chiarugi 2 mandrel also in snap. The little oval of aluminium keeps the two legs of the folded piece of cane together and aligned (very important!) while the wee beastie is being bound onto the more-or-less-conical brass tube (called a 'staple', in oboe-speak). You can also see the beginnigs of a split just above the binding, bother it


    Newly-tied reed on Chiarugi 2 47 staple by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    I've found out - completely by accident, of course - how to defeat the Flick br / > problem - gaaah! - a simple full stop! Or probably any other usual text character would do. Seals off the string and shuts the silly forum code parser up. Take that, stupid forum code interpreter! And that and that and that!, to paraphrase AA Milne.

    In my next post, I shall introduce you all (for a given value of 'all', to paraphrase the late Mr Pratchett) to some of my boat-building hand tools. I do hope that you all get on well together, as you will (hopefully) be seing a lot more of them...

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    OK.

    Forum members, meet some of the tools that I will be using to build the Sooty Tern with:

    1. Measuring and marking, rasping and scraping, cutting and even my box of router bits (and one 'Forstner' bit: it probably isn't, really - I broke my usual Golden Rule and bough a cheap one in a fit of stupidity), one bit per compartment. See also snap no. 3 regarding the wing in the background...


    Pile of various tools for building a boat with by Alex1N, on Flickr. Take that!, silly Forum code interpreter!



    2. Most of my collection of Perma-Grit tools. You will see these A LOT more! They are my most-used tools apart from the drill driver: I have used them for shaping fully-cured concrete to wood to epoxy glue. I really wouldn't be without them. Amazing things. They make short work of epoxy glue - zip: gone! they're brilliant! The 'Duck project would have been a miserable process without them. I have a set of Perma-Grit rifflers, but they are )inside the house in my (New*) Plastic Modelling Environment. A side note: the concrete slab of the shed floor, visible here, is epoxy-coated: two coats, with a special fine sand spread on the first while still wet, as a non-slip agent.


    Most of my collection of Perma-Grit tools
    by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. The entire front end of this plane, built from enlarged-by-me plans, was shaped with Perma-Grit tools (and a 9 mm brad-point wood-bit to make starter holes). And by the way, I make no money at all from Perma-Grit for raving about their fantastic tools. Treally Ruly. Part of the Skyfarer's wing (it's a very interesting aircraft) can be seen in the background of snap no. 1. There are a number of Bote-Cote epoxy + High Strength Glue Filler fillets at the front end - where some weight is also go to be needed, it has a long tail moment - mostly behind the (epoxy-laminated marine plywood) motor mount and on the plywood/spruce mount bearers behind it. I had to cobble together a new motor mount when I converted the IC-engined plan to electric, and I have no idea if it will work or not. The noseleg mount (the triangular bit behind the motor mount) is also epoxy-glued and filleted in place.


    General Aircraft Skyfarer fuselage: work in progress by Alex1N, on Flickr. Hah! Gotcha!



    4. Poor person's sash cramps - they worked a treat when laminating the WRC-paulownia foils board for the 'Duck! Some still have the protective packaging tape that I covered the jaws with, to help reduce them being covered in foaming single-pack polyurethane glue ('Purbond')


    Poor person's sash cramps by Alex1N, on Flickr.:P



    5. Various ratchet clamps of varying and mostly dubious quality[/url] by Alex1N, on Flickr!


    Various ratchet clamps of varying and mostly dubious quality by Alex1N, on Flickr~ Snizzle!


    6. My epoxy 'cupboard', which is unfortunately a rather sticky mess in spots, and needs cleaning up. Untidy though it is is, it is still many times better than the version that I had in the old Workswamp. Note the Würth sandpaper - 'dry as the Sahara'. And it is, too. Another tool that I wouldn't do without (acquired from Boatcraft Pacific, makers of Bote-Cote epoxy). And sharp as blazes!


    My epoxy cupboard! by Alex1N, on Flickr=

    * Not really - but it was a few years ago ; ).


    I seem to have cunningly remembered the six-image limit this time - no more, no less.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-15-2018 at 02:30 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    And one more, wot slipped through the net somewhat because I was rabbitting on about Skyfarers and Perma-Grit Tools - and forgot to upload it...

    '7.' Another pile of boat-relevant hand tools... In the centre, my hand-planes, including my Brazilian-made 'Bohrer' No. 5(?) and block and jack (No. 7?) planes from Carbatec - for Wood Duck, of course - and my two spokehaves. Also, some 'toy' Supercraft planes from a hardware store (don't ask) and a couple of balsa planes. And my treasured 270 mm Japanese cross-cut saw, another favourite and much-used tool, and what a fantastic instrument! Sharp? >Shudder!< It's missing a tooth, so it looks as though I will have to replace the blade. And let us not forget the clamps, of which one can never have too many! There are a couple of epoxy-covered Irwin ratchet clamps, also acquired to work on the 'Duck, and were at some times also indispensable. And the similarly epoxy-coated drill driver. I am also taking my spanner and socket sets with me, as I have a much better selection that up the mountain (which have taken years of patient purchasing one here, one there, as needed). I think that there is a gas torch hidden away in there too. And a very large soldering iron for recalcitrant epoxy-locked temporary screws. And a packet of biscuits.


    Another pile of hand tools by Alex1N, on Flickr,


    I have been having fun putting in varying characters after the Flickr, and they all seem to work so far - except when I forget to install one. I will have to tape up some boxes to cart all these things up in, but having hauled them all out, I'm not sure where I would put them all once I got them there. I got a wee bit over-enthusiastic, methinks.

    That's all for a bit.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWidders View Post
    Hi Alex. Many thanks for your kind words about the Whilly Tern build. I'm sure your build will come up very nicely also. Keep the pics coming.
    I will send you a pm with some supplier details.
    Cheers
    Hello Peter,

    My apologies for overlooking your post - I was too busy rabbitting on (as usual), and flinging snaps about the place as if there were no tomorrow. Thank you very much for the supplier suggestions - I’ll be able to get most of my metal bits from one of them: not the least being square-drive bronze screws! Great idea, the square drive: and I think they look nice, too. Very nautical, to my mind. And there are bronze eye-bolts, rowlocks, gudgeons, pintles - a chap could both mad and poor very quickly at sites like that!

    I keep remembering particluar stashes of wood in the mezzanine - when building Wood Duck, I ordered a whole lot of hoop pine from one place, and a whole lot of paulownia from another. The hoop was for masts and spars, the paulownia for cleats. I got things mixed up somehow and not only got the hoop pine for mast and spars, but paulownia scantlings for a mast as well as for cleats, so Wood Duck ended up with a highly experimental glass-sheathed mast! It does in fact work pretty well, and it’s light!. Since I used Douglas fir for the spars on that boat, the end result was that I used none of the hoop on the build, although I did start scarphing bits to make a sprit rig mast, an option that Mr Storer maintained from the David Routh original. This also means that I might have enough hoop for bottom-boards: but I find it to be a very bland sort of timber, or at least the stuff that I have is. I much prefer the character of Douglas fir.

    I have been keeping on forgetting to ask you: with Iain’s finger clamps, I am assuming that you are using wedges to tighten things up, but on the inside of the boat; or are you simply using the fingers as a press-fit? If you are using wedges, what did you make them from: plywood oddcuts, or solid wood? I have been considering using meranti, of which I have quite a lot after we had an inside structure dismantled at our old place.

    Thank you once again for the PMed suggestion, greatly appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-10-2018 at 07:44 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I've started boxing up tools to take up to the 'workshop' - against the time that it becomes the workshop again, not a storage unit for the painters .

    1. A dozen pipe clamp sets (from a total of fifteen). This is all that I can lift safely - and a waste of box space. I'm looking about the joint for a suitable sack... These are all senza pipes of course - yet to be dug out from under the chest o' drawers


    Pipe clamps - minus pipes by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Mr Snappy's going too! He says he's going to keep an eye on things. The clamps that he is currently keeping an eye on are probably not going to be much use: throats are too shallow. I'm taking them anyway because...you can never have too many clamps


    Mr Snappy’s going, too
    by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Box of assorted tools. On the top layer, my treasured 3M ear muffs (goes nicely with my treasured 3M 7200 Heavy Duty Snout Protector (already up there - the workshop, not my snout), high-contrast eye protectors, a socket wrench, a number of wood raspy-type things, a coping saw, and a roll of rubberised non-slip mat. There's a tenon saw close to the surface too - although it's now on top of everything for Mr Snappy to sit on, and so as to protect its teeth. Some packing tape on 'em wouldn't hurt, neiver. Plus dowel jig, hard-edged scraping tools (acquired for the 'Duck'), and the socket and spanner mini-drawers. The wooden block is the blade wedge for a small Scandinavian wooden plane


    Assorted tools, closer-up by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Most of the snaps in this thread so far live in my Iain Oughtred's Sooty Tern Flickr album. The ones here are 'hand-picked'...

    Yesterday, I rang up the mechanic who works on my aging Mazda 'Premacy' and asked him if he had any lead wheel-balances - and it turns out that he has quite a few. I'll pop up there when I have a 'convenient window of opportunity' (not today, sadly) and grab 'em! Many thanks to whoever it was wherever he posted on the Forum mentioning how he got his supply o' lead! I am starting to keep my eye open for suitable small cake tins,

    I also found out that my local hardware store, just around the corner as it were, has the 150 mm x 42 mm x 6 m LVLs cheaper than the last place I looked - and they also deliver up to Wentworth Falls. The delivery cost cancels out the cost savings, but it is 'only' $20 more for 30-odd extra kilometres (19-or-so miles), and I'd also rather get LVLs from them - a smaller operation who have to compete against the Rabbit Warren (not an easy task). I did think about attempting to cut costs but getting some radiata boards - but one look at 'em made me realise that I was being silly trying to cut a really fundamental critical corner.

    Weird - I just rang the plywood supplier in Penrith and asked if they had oriented strand board. Chap hadn't heard of it - turned out to be a special-order item. Hmm...

    I have started using a 'to-do' app (Things 3) to keep track of various build-associated things. It has been very useful so far, although a pen &/or pencil and paper can't be beat.

    Back to my reading of various WBF Oughtred double-ender threads and studying the plans...
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-11-2018 at 08:05 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I have been keeping on forgetting to ask you: with Iain’s finger clamps, I am assuming that you are using wedges to tighten things up, but on the inside of the boat; or are you simply using the fingers as a press-fit? If you are using wedges, what did you make them from: plywood oddcuts, or solid wood? I have been considering using meranti, of which I have quite a lot after we had an inside structure dismantled at our old place.

    Hi Alex,
    I recall I did not need too many wedges as the ply finger clamps did the trick. I tried to avoid using temporary screws into the frame/stringers as I wanted to clear finish the top 2 planks inside and the top plank outside with a clear finish. On 1 plank I had to resort to some screws but it was later painted over. I did use a few small wedges here and there: the meranti would be fine. Just be careful not to crush the ply plank on the edge....a thin pad + wedge can assist here. I did not need to use wedges on the inside of the boat ...just the outside was fine.
    Cheers
    PeterW

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Peter,

    Thank you for that! I will make up some wedges, won't take long. Well, once I get my workshop back again. It's been raining a lot lately - I am NOT complaining! We desperately need the stuff, the situation was becoming dangerous; it still is in many other places, for farmers and fire-fighters. I'm in the RFS, and things are not looking good, even with the rain. We are going to need a lot more, and soon! The rain has washed out the house-painting, but that's fine.

    I'll used the pad trick. In fact, I still have a few containers of packaging-tape-covered plywood pads left over from the 'Duck. Too thick for the planking application, but noted! Will look something out. I'm not doing a bright finish except for a few selected items - the hull inside and out will be PAINTED! My fingers still feel sore when I do so much as look at any sandpaper these days.


    I had a change of plan this arvo - I got my 'narrow window of opportunity' (it really ws narrow, literally) and I scooted up the mountains and came back with this:

    1. A bit less than 10 kg (22 lb) of lead wheel weights - possibly half a pig for the Sooty? - once the clips and other extraneous items have been removed and the things have been melted down. Not very much, but it's a start. There's a large box of sinkers and some part-rolls of lead flashing up at Wentworth Falls, and I've got some roll off-cuts here too, somewhere. It will all gradually add up. And it's not as though I am going to be needing the ballast pigs tomorrow - or any time soon.


    A bit less than 10 kg of lead wheel-weights by Alex1N, on Flickr.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-12-2018 at 04:01 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    You could be forgiven for harbouring the sneaking suspicion that I'm posting for the sake of it. In fact, I'm posting simply to boost my post numbers*.

    1. Some callipers, to go up to the workshop. The coloured boxes contain alphabetic (blue) and numeric (red) p1/8" punches, for labelling bottom-boards. Note the honing guide top right


    Some callipers by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Veritas 'Flush Plane': You slide it along a surface to slice off any protuberances, another 'Duck-related purchase. And this blade is actually still sharp, although you wouldn't know to look at it. This poor tool got too near the paint, and it had dried out by the time that I spotted it


    Veritas 'Flush Plane' by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Underside of ’Flush Plane’: also in need of a clean-up


    Underside of ’Flush Plane’ by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. ‘Flush Plane’ pulled apart: just two pieces; three, if you count the button magnet. It's a really, really simple idea. The magnetic that holds the two parts together is extraordinarily strong: you have to be careful when disassembling that you don't slip and...


    ‘Flush Plane’ pulled apart: just two pieces by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Pipe ‘sash cramp’ pipes. The pipes, of course, can be any length you like (within reason)


    Pipe ‘sash cramp’ pipes by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Everything that's going to go up to Wentworth Falls soon has been boxed, or in the case of the pipes, bagged (in an old kit-bag that I remembered that I had), ready to go. I have held back a few every-day things like my drill driver, plus the planes, spokeshaves and the honing guide. The planes and the spokeshaves are, distressingly, showing signs of rust and are needing some attention. Sharpening will be more easily done here at the moment, too.

    Cheers,
    Alex.

    * I'm joking.
    You can never have too many clamps

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1N View Post
    .....

    1. A bit less than 10 kg (22 lb) of lead wheel weights - possibly half a pig for the Sooty? - once the clips and other extraneous items have been removed and the things have been melted down. .......


    A bit less than 10 kg of lead wheel-weights by Alex1N, on Flickr.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    one really nice quality of lead is that it is heavier and melts before the clips n dirt etc so they will float to the top as you melt the odd parts down

    once in the pot and melting the farfelonous will be quite easy to simply scoop off the top of the liquified lead

    a wire basket type of scoop like the ones used for lifting fried food from hot grease works well is inexpensive and comes in several sizes

    mechanically removing those parts is not necessary ;-)

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Steve,

    Welcome to my thread, and thank you very much for your information and advice! I will keep my eye open for a scoop - we do have one that our daughter got for $2.80 or so from Daiso, but that one is definitely a kitchen-only implement.

    I’ll ask her when she’s going into town next (I go into the city as little as possible).

    Or I could make one .

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    When I log in to WBF, I get an alarming red Dire Warning(TM) from both Safari and Firefox (on a creaking old mid-2010 iMac running macOS 10.13.6). This is, in fact, the only site that I get this (and I have all my various security sniffers turned on). Does anyone else get this? Not that I have any data particularly worth protecting on here, but I still find it somewhat alarming.

    Anyway, Back to Pencil-Sharpeners-R-Us.

    I am making a list of Missing Things. Not a lot at the moment, but they include the chuck for the old drill press. I dare say that I could get a new and (much) more accurate chuck for it easily enough, but I won't be machining to 0.001 mm, or even 0.05 mm, tolerances here (maybe 0.1 mm).

    In reading other people's thread, I keep coming across things that are almost in plain view, but I have forgotten. This includes a batch o' clamps >gasp!<...


    1. Rediscovered clamp cache. This is a bit over half, which I remembered that I had squirrelled away in a filing cabinet drawer, and epoxy-coated from boat-building. The (entirely scratchbuilt) Skyfarer engine cowling seen to the right is made from 2 laminated layers of 1/64" birch aircraft plywood, a poplar ply rear former, some balsa (remnants) and an epoxy/sanding filler nose (originally balsa, too). And some cellulose sanding filler, largely sanded off


    Rediscovered clamp cache by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Even more clamps: yet another drawer of 'em. There is another drawer-full as well, but the clamps there are somewhat hit and miss: they were really cheap - I did know better - and croaked as soon as look at 'em


    Even more clamps by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Yes, more clamps. Of course! Some of the larger size from the drawer above


    Yes, *more* clamps. Of course! by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. When I was building the 'Duck, I poured any unused (neat) resin into an old mixing pot. As time went by, this waste-disposal/solid-resin-collecting-for-modelling process also became something of an unreplicated experiment (unreplicated in the sense that there were no separate multiple instances. And somewhat uncontrolled, but I can't actually think what the 'control' would have been other than one (or two) single solid pot(s)-full? I'll leave that to the reader, unless I suddenly have a Bright Idea (don't hold your breath). The aim of the 'experiment' was to see how well epoxy sticks to itself when cured; and also became, once WEST 105/207 joined the fray, how well different brands of epoxy stick together (I recently used Bote-Cote + High-strength Glue Powder to fill in a dip in the concrete slab in the new workshop here (I am an obsessive) and it was coated with a brand of industrial floor-coating epoxy - no problems there). The crux-point of the 'experiment' was going to be to whack the lump on the side with a heavy blunt instrument. It looked so interesting, however (a bit like a moss-agate), that I have so far refrained from it. Here's the lump; the container has long since gone to the Great Landfill in the Ground, however...


    Pot of cured epoxy resins by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Closer-up view of the resin lump: the white-ish layers are Bore-Cote (it does that in individual thicknesses greater than about 1/2-3/4 of a millimetre), the brownish ones are WEST 105/207


    Closer-up view of the resin lump by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Painter's pyramids: I thought that I'd bought them from Carbatec, but maybe not: they are certainly not in their catalogue at the moment. Maybe they weren't very popular, but I've certainly had quite a bit of success with them, myself. They were used recently to support a 10 mm steel plate for part of the new vibration-absorbing mount for my 'kitchen' lathe, while I epoxy-sealed/epoxy-painted it


    Painter’s pyramids
    by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Nothing I like doing more than sharpening pencils - continually.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-12-2018 at 10:23 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I had a go at cleaning up the rust from my planes this morning, using coarse steel wool. In the process, I found:

    1. A nasty ding in the edge of my No. 4 plane's sole (there was one on my treasured block plane, too, and in a similar spot). It was likely to have been from an in-transit knock:


    Ding in the edge of my No. 4 plane's sole by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Cleaned-up ding on my No. 4. I took the nib off with a fine-cut 1/2" flat file. I actually took another snap because I initially couldn't see the 'repair' in the snap when viewed on on the phone's screen and my rapidly-failing short-range eyesight. This is the original (and better) snap


    Cleaned-up ding in my No. 4 by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Cleaned-up ding: sole edge. The sole was obviously whacked from the side: here's the - filed-off - contact point. Plane soles have sides square to the base for a very good reason...


    Cleaned-up ding: sole edge by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Regarding the rust, it looks as though it may been been incurred in the old Workswamp: I would imagine that if it had been ongoing over the last almost-five-years or so, that it would have been worse. Or it is recent from some sawdust that has been flying about the place. I have been a bit pre-occupied over that time.



    4. Recently ‘rediscovered’ light stand, Mr Snappy looking after it of course. One of the globes was missing, so...


    Recently ‘rediscovered’ light stand by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. I had to pop out and get a new globe. Someone has had the nous to detect a market in replacements for rapidly-blowing light-stand globes and fill the niche: here's a packet o' six wot I found just now at the local hardware store. These types of globe don't last long in my experience: excessive heat, along with clumsy persons getting paw-grease on 'em. Handle with a thick, soft clean cloth, kids! 500 W per globe is hot: I have room-heaters of that output - and in the case of the latter, the heat isn’t as concentrated, either. I use the stand only when necessary, e.g., in winter, but there is a dark area under the new and enlarged mezzanine in the Wentworth Falls (WF) workshop that we haven't got around to getting an electrician to put lights in yet. Note the shaped reed cane in the background, awaiting being tied on to their staples - this is what they look like when you get 'em (in bundles o' ten, usually)


    Multi-pack on new light-stand globes by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    Hmm...the portrait of the single unit on the packet reminds me that I used to have one of those: it lived up o one of my storage areas in the old place. I wonder what happened to that? On the Missing Things list with it!

    That'll do for the moment. I'm off to take the packed-up tools and so forth up the mountains shortly.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-13-2018 at 07:12 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Well, another step forward. Maybe: I'm not sure yet. By the time I left WF I was as cross as two sticks, having had to negotiate the painters' various booby traps with my gear. I should have stayed home. I did a bit of tidying in my ‘own’ little restricted area, to make it a little less lethal. I'm still cross. As a matter of fact, I'm seething with fury, especially after encountering various trip hazards. I should have know better. I was so cross that I forgot to take a snap of Mr Snappy in his new abode (he was the first in). He's sitting on the Triton tabletop, anyway, and seems to like it there. I had better warn the painters not to annoy him. He's got lots of sharp pointy teeth (they are a bit rubbery though).

    I managed to squirrel the light stand and some clamps away behind the boat, and the rest of it is more-or-less out of the painters' way. Sort of.

    To help cheer myself up again, here's some snaps of my yellow and black clamps, taken before I carted 'em up to WF; yellow is considered to be a cheery colour, but in nature, yellow and black combinations is a warning.

    1. Ratchet clamps: yet more alumni from the 'Duck build


    ‘Ratchet’ clamps by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Closer-up view of the smaller ratchet clamps. Obviously used on the 'Duck, what with all the epoxy glue blobs and smears


    Closer-up view of the smaller ‘ratchet’ clamps by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. The larger ratchet clamps. I checked every single ratchet clamp to see if any were broken or not - to my utter astonishment, they all passed!


    The larger ratchet clamps by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Ratchet clamp ratchet; jaws wide open


    ‘Ratchet’ clamp ratchet by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Some of the powertools already waiting for the painters to finish. I did indeed leave a router bit in the hand-trimmer in the middle of the bottom shelf: a 1/8" round-over bit. The larger router to the left of it has a 'biscuit cutter' bit in it. The larger router is going into the Triton table to convert the latter over to (unsurprisingly) a router table, once I've docked various pieces of LVL to make building frame legs and cross-members, and set up the Carbatec saw table. Once the painters have removed their clobber. Humph. Note the very wearable (for long periods) 3M Heavy Duty Snout Protector, top left. It's both soft and light. This is the second one that I've bought, I like them so much. One for here, one for there...


    Some of the powertools already waiting for the painters to vamoose by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Four boxes of tools from home, sitting on top of my Hafco air filter which is still waiting to be installed. I had the filter suspended from the 'ceiling' when back in the old Workswamp, but I haven't had the need for it yet: the only woodwork has been very light stuff involving the Skyfarer in the shed at home. I'm hoping that the appearance of the boxes might give the painters a vague and subtle hint. Triton bits and pieces lurk behind the large folded removalists' 'tea-chest', including the biscuit jointer and the the more recent router tabletop and fence


    Four boxes of tools from home by Alex1N, on Flickr.

    I've had a bit of dinner and am a little less cross. The Boss had earlier provisionally green-lit the bandsaw, but I was in such a foul mood that it didn't sink in. Maybe it will later.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-13-2018 at 09:15 PM. Reason: Toned down the ranting somewhat, corrected the router bit size
    You can never have too many clamps

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    431

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Yes, you do seem to have plenty of clamps!
    I couldn't be without my thicknesser and bandsaw.
    Glad you're a little less cross now.
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #31
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hello Ian,

    Thank you: I’m even less cross now. And see the bottom of this post.

    A friend around the corner has a thicknesser, which he has agreed to let me use if I need it. At this stage, I'm thinking of the stems and possibly the keelson. I can't get a bandsaw and a thicknesser at this stage: a bandsaw is going to be more useful, I think.

    1. Final box of tools - mostly clamps. The long Perma-Grit tool can be seen in the background; my 1.2 m spirit level is there too, but behind stuff where it can’t be seen very easily


    Final box of tools - mostly clamps
    by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    2. Some parts of the old drill press base, table support, table rack and headstock - the column can just be seen lurking behind the pillar. Looking at these bits reminds me that I haven’t seen the drive train covers in a long while. Hmmm...it might end up with naked belts and pulleys >gasp<. On the Missing Things List with it!


    Some parts of the old drill press by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. More bits and pieces from the old drill press: motor and spindle pulleys, quill pinion, quill, quill spring and case, and various other bits and pieces. Contrary to how I witter on, I do actually keep things relatively organised. Still no sign of the chuck, maybe it's in that round tin: I didn't think to check - I merely poked the phone at it, went, put the lid back on, and went off to trip over yet another obstacle


    More bits and pieces from the old drill press by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Maternal grandfather’s old planes. These have both cracked and split right down the middle of the bodies, through to the soles. I have been pondering for many years how to fix this: probably neat epoxy and gradual - but not too gradual - clamping pressure. The missing handle is about somewhere. The blades are in a kerosene bath in the bottom part of my previous shop vacuum (I think!)


    Maternal grandfather’s old planes by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. Brand new 7-1/2” circular saw - well, I've had it for a few months. I just haven't done anything with it, not even installing the blade that came with it.. I got it at the suggestion of Robert Ayliffe, for cutting planks from plywood sheets. I brought it home to slice up one of the 12 mm plywood sheets for finger clamps with the aid of its fence, and may also attempt to use it to cut out the moulds but this latter only if I can get enough space between the moulds to do so without destroying them. Otherwise, I'll retrieve the Japanese crosscut saw from WF, as it has a useful 'egg-tooth' that allows it to start cuts in the middle of a piece of wood, and goodness me is it sharp.


    Brand new 7-1/2” circular saw by Alex1N, on Flickr.

    I'm in a better frame of mind now, having spent the evening relaxing in front of the telly.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-14-2018 at 01:48 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    431

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hi Alex,
    Glad you're not so cross now.
    It's a big move you're making.
    May I suggest that you keep your plans under cover as much as possible. I have found that they tend to fade and go yellow if they are left in the light too much.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    11,895

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Good grief! Another Sooty Tern!? Will this madness never end?

    You do realise it’s going to destroy your equinamity, don’t you? Even when you’ve got other, perfectly valid and worthy things to do, you’ll find your mind drifting off, daydreaming about going off sailing. Even when doing important stuff, like meeting with your banker, or your real estate agent, or filling out tax forms, there’ll be a part of your mind that’s elsewhere, afloat.

    Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

  34. #34
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Hi Alex,
    Glad you're not so cross now.
    It's a big move you're making.
    May I suggest that you keep your plans under cover as much as possible. I have found that they tend to fade and go yellow if they are left in the light too much.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Hello Ian, I have simmered down almost completely now - the one exception is the residual annoyance from the painters apparentlly raiding my jealously-coveted Douglas fir stocks, especially anything that’s quarter-sawn. They are Out of Bounds and use is verboten. It as a piece of quarter-sawn that was used without checking with me first. I was so incandescent about that that I appear to have blanked it out until this morning. Anyway, my normal balanced-ish has returned, and I’m on an even keel again.

    Thanks for the advice about plans and light: the construction plans sheets are near a window; and the shed at home’s lights are fluoros and therefore emit UV. I’ll start getting in the habit of rolling them up when I’ve finished the work session as well, even though the natural light in the shed is dim and no direct sun comes through the rather small windows.



    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Good grief! Another Sooty Tern!? Will this madness never end?

    You do realise it’s going to destroy your equinamity, don’t you? Even when you’ve got other, perfectly valid and worthy things to do, you’ll find your mind drifting off, daydreaming about going off sailing. Even when doing important stuff, like meeting with your banker, or your real estate agent, or filling out tax forms, there’ll be a part of your mind that’s elsewhere, afloat.

    Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

    Hello James, welcome aboard, too! I was wondering if you were going to turn up, you still being in Singapore(?) by the looks of it . I’m currently daydreaming about actually getting started on building the craft - and attempting to get organised. As for my equanimity, see above. And I consider myself duly warned! Good to see you .

    In other news, I am pondering making some mannng benches, having noted their usefulness in Geoff Kerr’s video sequence. This even more pertinent given the relarive narrow working area that won’t be taken up by boat (this is irrespective of area taken up by painters with expansionist tendencies). I’ve been looking around various places for hardwood of suitable dimension for such things, and haven’t found very much yet. I think I’ll have to start looking somewhat further afield.

    Per the information PMed me by PeterWidders, I have also found a source of suppy for D-cross section brass rubbing strip for the keel, bilge runners and stems, and in Sydney, to boot - thank you again, Peter!

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-14-2018 at 04:55 PM. Reason: added comment about finding a brass rubbing strip supplier
    You can never have too many clamps

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    OK, here's the post before the page flip, and in one respect one could argue that it's quite appropriate - or not. More on that later.

    After my horrible experience with the workspace the day before, I was feeling rather glum yesterday - so I tried to cheer myself up by doing a bit of cleaning and tidying up in the shed at home. After pushing the broom around for a bit then moving some stuff, things looked a bit better (they looked a lot better this morning for some unfathomable reason). It worked reasonably well, although I managed to put one of my drill river batteries down, and it vanish. I gave up the search in lieu of looking again in the morning - when I found it: it had fallen down behind something onto something around about the same black colour...

    1. My own trip hazards - I can't really criticise anyone else, can I? These paint tins should be off to the recycling depot - I need to ring up and check that it has reopened after the Great Asbestos Removal Event of 2017-18 (oops!)... Note that the Fuselage Alignment Jig has been removed from its previous perch - I need the stand - put back entirely on the bench. It was jutting out into free space for ready access to both sides of the Skyfarer fuselage when I was, ahem, correcting a slip-up in the, er, alignment. In my defence, the original assembly was done on a really wonky prototype version of the jig, specially after its MDF base (accursèd stuff) got wet. This new one is much better! Now that the error is 'fixed' and the fuselage is now free-range again, the jig no longer needs to stick out. I need to extract the 2 hp dust extractor from the corner, against the day that I can dismantle it and take it up to the nascent boat workshop. It's far too heavy for me to lift into the car, and it wouldn't like the journey across the lawn and down the drive very much...


    My own trip-hazards... by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    On to directly-related Sooty Tern stuff now, my goodness me >gasp<:

    2. Oughtred ‘window’: this is so that the plans can be lined up against centre- and baselines for greater accuracy. Mr Oughtred describes this in his Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual. I have a very useful app on my phone (Camera 2+) which allows almost true macro shots - unlike Apple's own app - and this is an example


    Oughtred ‘window’ by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    3. Oughtred ‘window’ open to let the line in. Well, it would if it were in from of one. You fold it back, and line up your plan and board lines. I cut my widows out with a 150 ''/6" steel rule and a scalpel. This explanation is for those very few who haven't seen this technique - and to show the rest that I know about it


    Oughtred ‘window’ open to let the line in by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    4. Fiddling around with butcher’s paper: this is, in actual fact, going somewhere for once. Here, I'm gluing two pieces of paper together; the faintly visible line just right of centre is to allow me to draw a line of glue with an UHU glue stick onto the bottom sheet, so that I can keep the glue from being let loose in the wild, from under the sheet on top. The trick was to make sure that the baseline and centreline were at 90 degrees to each other, and that the baseline for both sheets *were in one contiguous straight line* As they way, a picture is worth a thousand words...


    Fiddling around with butcher’s paper by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    5. ‘Half-mould No. 4 pattern’ in butcher’s paper, cut out with the scalpel. This is only moderately a bit accurate, and not the final word by any means. The aim here is to get some idea of the relative sizes of the moulds on the sheet of plywood* so that I can see how many I can get from one Oz-Standard 1200 x 2400 sheet. We lose quite a bit compared with everyone else in Der Welt*


    ‘Half-mould No. 4 pattern’ in butcher’s paper by Alex1N, on Flickr.



    6. Full-width Mould 4 outline. The LH part of the outline can't be seen here, or at the most is visible only faintly, but it is just under the top of the snap. No heavy felt-tipped pen outlines at the moment - this is just reconnaissance. It turns out that I can only get Mould No. 1 out of this sheet as well - a world-standard sheet would have allowed that :E. I started with the widest mould for this very reason: I wanted to know whether I am going to have to start getting smaller moulds out of the middles of larger ones. It looks at this stage that I might have to. I have three sheets, and one of those is going to be used, at least partially, to make the slightly larger finger clamps required for the for 9 mm-thick planks (as opposed to 6 mm ones)


    Full-width Mould 4 outline by Alex1N, on Flickr.


    You could argue that that is a good place to turn the page, but you could also argue that the next page would be a good place to start actual boat stuff.

    Anyway, that' sit for the moment. I will go back to my little jigsaw puzzle in a bit: I have another five or so templates to make - No. 5 is the next one down in size from No. 4, so that will be next. If No. 2 fits next to No. 5 - it probably won't - then that leaves 3, 6 and 7 - or 2, 3 and 6 if 7 fits next to 5. Or, the nesting of various moulds; 4, 6 & 2 and 5, 7 & 3 plus 1 on one of the sheets. Or something.

    Additional Note: The butcher's paper is proving rather hard to work with, even considering the approximate nature of the half-mould outlines. I'm getting creases and crinkles and baselines not lining up. Being an obsessive type, this niggles. I have a roll of 80 gsm drafting paper, but it's down in the lock-up. I'll go and get it tomorrow morning. A second look at the nesting suggests 5 & 7, 4 & 1, with 2, 3 and 5 separately laid out. still muddling through this, will become clearer tomorrow. I want to keep the moulds restricted to 2-1/4 sheets, 2-1/3 at the most, but we'll see.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-15-2018 at 04:50 PM. Reason: Added note about paper quality
    You can never have too many clamps

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