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Thread: Gordie & his Monk

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    3,042

    Default Gordie & his Monk

    Pretty interesting colorful guy struggling with all the things most of us would be struggling with if living aboard, this episode he is removing the engine through the window. Kinda make me wanna scream but he gets it done!
    https://youtu.be/w80bcj_kRMg
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    25,488

    Default Re: Gordie & his Monk

    Wow. Not a fun job. He needs to learn a few comealong tricks - but otherwise - well done!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    699

    Default Re: Gordie & his Monk

    I am fallowing his postings on YouTube.....his drone video was pretty cool, all the way to the end .
    He was on this forum for a while too.
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    1985 Glen L15 - 1980 Johnson 7.5 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Gordie & his Monk

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Wow. Not a fun job. He needs to learn a few comealong tricks - but otherwise - well done!
    All come a long tricks welcome. Hate the damn things.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    25,488

    Default Re: Gordie & his Monk

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Knowles View Post
    All come a long tricks welcome. Hate the damn things.
    Ha! That'll teach me to open my big mouth! Truly though - your maneuvering around of that big old Perkins was quite ingenious.

    I understand how you feel about comealongs, as they can reach out & bite you - but then they let you deal with some pretty huge forces. The biggest thing is for letting a load down. If the comealong is properly lubricated (unlike the one that's been banging around in the box in the bed of my truck with all the chains & binders), extending the handle all the way away from the side the cable comes into will let the load down one click - so a back & forth motion of just a few inches will let the load down without getting your hands anywhere near the gear & pawl. Ratchet straps do much the same thing.

    The other thing is that -when lifting - it's easier for most people to pull down on the handle, as pushing up tends to inadvertently get the object being lifted swinging. Of course this is more of a personal preference thing.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Gordie & his Monk

    Thanks, good tips.
    Hard to believe I've been using these buggers for decades and didn't know about the easy lower feature.
    Much prefer chain falls

    Cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    25,488

    Default Re: Gordie & his Monk

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Knowles View Post
    Thanks, good tips.
    Hard to believe I've been using these buggers for decades and didn't know about the easy lower feature.
    Much prefer chain falls

    Cheers
    You bet! Chain falls are far more civilized.

    I'd been using them for years (lowering the way you were) before an old-timer (aka someone the age I am now) showed me the trick...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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