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Thread: A Good Buy...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Central Coast, Ca
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    Default A Good Buy...

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/tls...716627339.html

    ($500 - Probably made by South Bend or Sheldon)

    IMG_4284.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Whangarei Northland New Zealand
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    127

    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    looks pretty good . You'll need a 4 jaw chuck , Should not be too expensive. I think to cut the full range of threads that change gears are required ,No mention of them . Likely available. Cost ? unknown.
    Suggest using High Speed Steel tool bits .Grind you own as needed ,Those Chinese carbide bits are poor..
    A vast amount of work can be done on a lathe of this size , With the addition of an available attachment ,milling can be carried out. YouTube is loaded with info as to its operation ,They can be a source of great satisfaction, Allows one to produce a vast array of parts..
    The lathe is the king of machines..
    Cheers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Whangarei Northland New Zealand
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    127

    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    Hi I had a look at the ever useful and interesting site "Lathes UK'
    Listed under "Montgomery Ward is a discussion and photos along with a lot of useful information
    It is a Logan lather Badges for Montgomery ward . Interesting fact is that Logan is a functioning company and supports these machines,

  4. #4
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    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    Logan makes sense, I had a 10" Logan about 50 years ago...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
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    11,894

    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    No boat builder has a complete shop without a metal lathe. Of course then one should have a mill as well. Looks like a good lathe. You might want to get a sine bar and dial indicator so that you can check the bed and cross feed for accuracy.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 10-07-2018 at 12:20 PM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    My experience with a lathe is accuracy is no better than the operator, they are infinitely adjustable. (The only thing I would check is the spindle run-out)

    That machine is a good lathe for someone, it looks like it has hardly been used other than at a hobby level.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    central cal
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    15,609

    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    Ouch!

    Story of my life, eh?

    Peace,
    Day Late, Dollar Short

  8. #8
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    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    Yup that one was a steal

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
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    San Francisco Bay
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    11,691

    Default Re: A Good Buy...

    Don't feel too bad. it probably wasn't as much of a steal as it might seem. Even if it's in top shape, it isn't at all hard to drop a couple of grand more on basic tooling for a basic lathe like that and I'm not talking about the really expensive stuff like milling attachments, tool post grinders, CNC conversions, and taper attachments. Probably the best way to go is to find an old retired master machinist with no sons who has a personal lathe at home that he's babied for years. Give his wife your name and phone number and ask that she give you a call when he croaks. Then be prepared to spend a lot more than $500 unless you've got the stomach for taking advantage of old widows.

    As one who lusted after a bench lathe of that size for decades and finally "got lucky" on Craigslist, I'd say, 1) learn all you can about the type of lathes you are looking for, including all the tooling, 2) be ready to shell out the cash if and when one comes along, 3) and remember that it's really all about the tooling. $500 to $1,000 lathes in that size range aren't all that rare. (1,000's were built during the War for parts production.) Often, however, they've been pretty well picked clean of tooling and machinists' instruments long before somebody finally decides to "get that damn thing out of the garage." Don't be fooled by the prices of Asian after-market tooling, either. A lot of it doesn't fit the old "Ammuricun Arn," and the vultures on eBay break down many perfectly good old lathes for parts and sell them for many times what their original cost simply because of their rarity. Owning a lathe can be a bit like having a monkey on your back. There's always some other piece of tooling you'd really like to have for it.

    "Tubalcain" (AKA "Mr. Pete 222) on YouTube is a retired machine shop teacher and he really knows his stuff. You can learn a lot from his videos. There's over a hundred of them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7Uv...69869E8CB708F2

    Here's his three part series on "How to Buy a Lathe:"

    Part I: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MqYOgtQGdA

    Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYni5QP0qyw&t=2s

    Part III: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCv1xbk8Muw&t=21s
    Last edited by Bob Cleek; 10-10-2018 at 10:21 PM.

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