Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Alternative Mirror rigs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Port Elizabeth, South Africa
    Posts
    274

    Default Alternative Mirror rigs

    A friend has just restored a Mirror for no-hassle solo sailing. He does not require the efficiency afforded by the jib, but sailing with only the main leaves him with little sail area.

    The thought of a free-standing mast is also appealing for its quick rig and de-rig time. Structural modifications aside, would a lug sail be a sensible option?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    9,562

    Default Re: Alternative Mirror rigs

    I dont see why not, either standing or balanced.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: Alternative Mirror rigs

    https://reallysimplesails.com has a range of sizes and should scale to suit a mirror if one of the off the shelf options isn't right.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    15,575

    Default Re: Alternative Mirror rigs

    Unless he wants to move the mast, the trick will be to use a sail that goes forward of the mast enough to give the correct balance -- not too much weather helm, which is what you get when you remove the jib. A balanced lug might do the trick...
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    977

    Default Re: Alternative Mirror rigs

    Mirrors have two mast steps a few inches apart. The forward one is specifically intended for single handed sailing using the small (gunter) main and no jib. It would probably enable a larger lug to balance quite nicely although it would require the standing rigging to be retained unless major structural rework is envisaged in the area of the bow buoyancy tank.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Lenox, MA/Vineyard Haven, MA
    Posts
    900

    Default Re: Alternative Mirror rigs

    The freestanding mast would be kind of tricky to do given the construction of a Mirror (I have one). They're very light plywood, tack-and-tape boats so in order to give the mast enough bury you'd have to bridge the boat at gunwhale height with a thick mast partner plank, and then open up the sealed foredeck compartment to get a solid mast step in there, since the standard stayed mast foots on the deck in one of two square receptacles. Not that any of this would be very hard, there's just not a lot of meat anywhere on a Mirror so you'd have to brace that partner plank well with underslung knees, and screw it down into the gunwhales. The mast step would have to be glued and then screwed to the boat through the bottom planking which is only about 1/4" thick so it would require some delicacy and good epoxying.

    I like the idea though--the mirror rig is fairly complicated for trailer sailing and it would make the boat a lot more enticing to use at a moment's notice. Also, a balanced lug is close winded and has massive pulling power down wind and can have a substantial amount of sail forward of the mast. I've sailed my Mirror in the forward mast position with no jib and it seemed fine

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    607

    Default Re: Alternative Mirror rigs

    For most of my designs I use timber pads as partners and steps to distribute the loads into the plywood. The ply is quite capable of taking the loads. Sometimes it makes sense to have the partner or step longer to also act as a deckbeam - but if the deck is supported already a well glued to well sanded timber block 19mm (3/4in) thick with an area of 135 x 300mm would be quite strong and safe GLUED WITH EPOXY. After several structures have failed using alternative glues I'm pretty adamant that centrecases and mast structure get glued with the dreaded pox.

    Also adding a layer of plywood to the step or partner helps avoid splitting of the step/partner. along the grain or some glass would do the same.

    Balance lug is nice because it allows some area to be added in front of the mast, which allows more to be added behind the sail too.

    MIK

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •