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Thread: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

  1. #141
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Quote Originally Posted by Small boats rock View Post
    No exterior surface on my boats gets varnished, been there and well and truly done with that, but I enjoy seeing it on other peoples boats. Your mast will look stunning.
    Thanks for that Geoff and everyone else for the practical,theoretical and moral support. If I missed any reply’s it was purely an overload of projects between the house renovations the mast and the Tammie on the back burner.

  2. #142
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Those bronze screws holding the old bolsters where never going to budge. On the bright side the remaining blue gum will provide a nice chafe guard for the gaff.

    [IMG]photo img[/IMG]

  3. #143
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    I put cetol over epoxy and was astonished at how well it did. So I'm sure it'll cover a single pot varnish ok. You can always do a test section, but if the mast is easy to lower you'll stay on top of the varnish pretty easily anyway.
    Re the saddle to lowers , that sound right. As a footnote , in all the rigs I looked at in my boat's period , Edwardian to between the wars , a lot of the good rigs had the lowers and spreaders attaching on the leading edge of the mast, the front.
    ie the spreaders were a straight bar attached by a u bolt around the mast in a similar way to springs attached to a differential in a car.Obviously it was done in a more nautical fashion than that simplified description, they were typically forged.
    The purpose being to get the shrouds forward to allow the gaff to freely revolve on the mast to square, without loading the shrouds.

  4. #144
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    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Long ago , I wooded my masts and coated them with Interlux Perfection Clear, which is a 2 part clear LP. It held up really well, but the wood underneath got lighter and lighter, after about 8 years my fir masts looked like driftwood with perfect clear varnish.
    I disced the main off ane cetoled bare wood,but the mizzen....I cetoled OVER the Perfection. That was about 10 years ago! I touch up the dings now and then... stuff is amazing .
    You cannot tell the difference between the two masts .

  5. #145
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Re the saddle to lowers , that sound right. As a footnote , in all the rigs I looked at in my boat's period , Edwardian to between the wars , a lot of the good rigs had the lowers and spreaders attaching on the leading edge of the mast, the front.

    The purpose being to get the shrouds forward to allow the gaff to freely revolve on the mast to square, without loading the shrouds.

    Not sure if I follow your statement concerning lowers attachment to the leading edge of the mast?

    Are you suggesting moving the new bolsters forward from the centre of mast position where the old ones where located.

    Also if this was your mast would you insist on spreaders, and do you think moving the lowers chainplate three foot aft as per Tim’s suggestion will create a chaff problem for the sails or rigging and gaff when running in lively conditions.

    And Thanks guys for your input on Cetol.

  6. #146
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    If I may chime in...

    Spreaders mean less stress on the upper shrouds for a given amount of mast holding-up-ness. At least 12 degrees between the mast and the shroud is what to aim for. 12 degrees is where the graph of shroud tension per lateral load at the mast head starts to ramp up steeply. I got this from Brion Toss' Rigger Apprentice book. Spreaders give you a more strongly braced upper mast for smaller shroud loads. If you're going to fly a topsail then this is a good thing.

    Moving the aft lowers back a bit will give you *more* of a chafe problem, yes, but maybe not as much more as you'd think. Downwind, the gaff will fly out wider than the boom, and up there your lowers aren't in the way.

    But you have a couple of rig designs there which you're hybridising, yes? Wee Barkie's original one and the couta boat rig. Do those have spreaders?

  7. #147
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Couta boats do not have spreaders, so there are no provisional hardware for mounting them.

    Regarding plans for WB original gaff rig, things are looking good with the main luff measurement of 16 foot achieved,once I fit a new set of bolsters.
    I am still not fully committed to shortening the gaff to WB original 9’6” and will leave that open to debate.
    WB original gaff angle of 30 degrees combined with provisions for a topsail does leave that option open depending on wether or not it can be crammed in there.
    I would speculate a longer gaff could also mean a larger topsail? which would also mean spreaders might be advantageous.

  8. #148
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Bolsters have been moved up the spar and I’m up to around five coats of varnish.

    I decided to fill another series of smaller checks with pitch,while also experimenting with trying to mix beeswax with pitch and that does not seem to work by simply stirring.
    I also found by filtering pitch and also beeswax you end up with a much cleaner product,I simply used a fine mosquito net.

    Both natural ingredients also have surprising glue like qualities.

    Today I also made a pattern for the tabernacle to ensure it will work on WB,no doubt it will be tight with a hatch at the front and a skylight at the rear of the mast.

    Another question I have been trying to solve is how is the tabernacle mast moved to overcome the weight and subsequent friction when dropping it? A cut away heel,wedges under the mast,or a smaller bolt used on the pivoting point?

    Matt WB original rig had spreaders while her present rig and also the Couta boat rig run without them.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  9. #149
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    Default

    I don't understand your question about how the tabernacle moves. You need risers on your shroud plates so that the shrouds terminate and pivot exactly in line with the mast pivot point. And a forward facing pole or job (like a crane jib, not a sail jib) to manage the angle of your hoisting/lowering line.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #150
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I don't understand your question about how the tabernacle moves. You need risers on your shroud plates so that the shrouds terminate and pivot exactly in line with the mast pivot point. And a forward facing pole or job (like a crane jib, not a sail jib) to manage the angle of your hoisting/lowering line.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    My question regarding mast movement was centred around overcoming the initial friction created between the base plate and the mast ,which with a flush cut bottom of the mast such as mine would mean the mast would need to be lifted in order to overcome the friction

    My solution would be to trim part of the aft heel of the mast or shave right around the base creating a rounded base. Am I preceding in the right direction or is there another solution?

    Below is my mast with the two tabernacle holes the top one located 400mm or 16” from the base which is flush or square cut.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  11. #151
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Is it to pivot from the upper hole? You won't need very much rounding on the base in that case. If it's to pivot from the lower hole... why?

  12. #152
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    I went looking for an image of what Phil was talking about; the gin pole, and instead found a whole thread discussing all the forces involved. Here ya go:
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t-lowering-rig

  13. #153
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    Quote Originally Posted by MattSplatt View Post
    Is it to pivot from the upper hole? You won't need very much rounding on the base in that case. If it's to pivot from the lower hole... why?
    The pivot point will utilise the upper hole ,and I will need to shave around 6mm or 1/4 inch of the mast base .
    At the same time the original question still remains as to how that mast base operated in a tabernacle given it was square cut.

    I haven’t given the mast raising much thought which will be done on a wharf preferably with a low tide using a block aft with the winching line led to WB primary winch.
    The gin pole is a good idea and I am just wondering if we might be able to use the gaff for that purpose.?

  14. #154
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    Default Re: A New Gaff Rig for Wee Barkie

    The gaff or boom would be a fine gin pole if raising the mast off the foredeck. The mast is quite forward in the boat though, isn't it? Raising it off the stern is probably easier. A spinnaker pole would work too.

    This raises a question for me: If you haven't given thought to raising/lowering mast, why is it going in a tabernacle? Do you actually need to be able to easily raise and lower it? (other than for frequent varnishing)

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