Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Twin Lake, MI
    Posts
    42

    Default Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    Mine are gummed up from sitting for a while. What do you use to clean out resin and hardener from them?

    Thanks
    Todd

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    1,050

    Default Re: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    Are you talking about West plastic mini pump? They do wear out so are you sure they are worth cleaning? Consider the cost of the solvents required to truly clean them and is it a zero sum game to save them?
    Steamboat

    I get by with the judicious use of serendipity.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    18,580

    Default Re: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    White vinegar. Alcohol.You can keep pumping the same small quantity through if you pour some into wide enough container --like a pound coffee can.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    16,931

    Default Re: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    No solvents needed.
    Vinegar for the resin , vinegar is pretty cheap.
    WEST hardened is water soluble. Hot water is pretty cheap .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    2,861

    Default Re: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    After ordering a set of new pumps for $16, you can try to clean the ol ones while you are waiting for the new ones to arrive in the mail. https://www.jamestowndistributors.co...ct.do?pid=3815

    While the pumps are in the mail, you can try to clean them as directed by West Systems. https://www.westsystem.com/the-105-s...00-mini-pumps/
    If the pumps have been sitting on the cans for a while they may develop a crust on the end of the spout. Hardener pumps particularly seem to do this. The crust is easily cleaned away: just break it off and wipe the spout. You can use warm water to clean the hardener pumps and acetone or denatured alcohol for the resin pump, if needed.
    Worst case is that you will have a spare set. The old ones will wear out.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    1,050

    Default Re: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    Quote Originally Posted by Steamboat View Post
    Are you talking about West plastic mini pump? They do wear out so are you sure they are worth cleaning? Consider the cost of the solvents required to truly clean them and is it a zero sum game to save them?
    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    White vinegar. Alcohol.You can keep pumping the same small quantity through if you pour some into wide enough container --like a pound coffee can.

    Kevin
    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    No solvents needed.
    Vinegar for the resin , vinegar is pretty cheap.
    WEST hardened is water soluble. Hot water is pretty cheap .
    These are two credible sources, I would follow their advice.
    Steamboat

    I get by with the judicious use of serendipity.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    2,861

    Default Re: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    I have only worked with pumps for 20 years as a volunteer in two shops, one of which tends to avoid epoxy just enough to have the pumps go bad, and their experience has been that the pumps do not respond well to cleaning.

    In spite of some contrary advice, always wear gloves. Avoidance is best, and rarely sufficiently effective. Change them often, when they get sloppy, as soon as they break, before if possible. Good genes and luck can help, but you don't know if you have either until it's too late to matter. Disposable nitrile are much better than latex and the heavier nitrile are much better than the cheap ones. (No, we haven't gotten to the anti-glove advice on this thread yet) The only safe, if relatively ineffective solvent is mineral oil. Of course, having cleaned up with mineral oil, you have to clean up the mineral oil. It is the best thing for beach tar.

    According to some obscure forum, isopropyl alcohol and d-limonene are effective solvents. I can speak for limonene as to its efficacy as a solvent. http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-Epoxy-cleanup

    West Systems may also be credible. https://www.epoxyworks.com/index.php...it-for-salads/
    Vinegar: Save it for Salads
    By Glenn House

    Vinegar is a mild solvent and is sometimes promoted as a “harmless” solution for cleaning epoxy from skin. At first blush, this seems to makes sense. Vinegar is a common food ingredient. It has been used medicinally as an anti-fungal agent and as an old time sun burn remedy. Italian dressing, sauerkraut and pickles could not exist without it.

    However, if used to clean epoxy from your skin, vinegar can promote overexposure to epoxy and subsequent allergic reactions. Common household vinegars, both distilled white and apple cider, contain 4 to 10% dilute acetic acid. They also contain low percentages of alcohols and mineral salts. When applied to remove epoxy, vinegar slightly dissolves it then penetrates the protective layers of skin, carrying epoxy into your subdermal tissues. This increases the chance of an allergic reaction, and may also increase the reaction’s intensity. Any wiping, rubbing or agitation of the contact area will likely worsen the situation.

    You can safely use vinegar to clean your tools. You might also use it occasionally to get epoxy off of your skin without much risk of health problems. You’ll further reduce the risk by gently washing with soap and warm water after using vinegar this way.

    However, you shouldn’t use vinegar to clean epoxy from your skin on a regular basis. It’s much safer to use a waterless skin cleanser or other detergent-based products with a strong emulsifying action. These won’t drive epoxy into your sensitive subdermal tissues.

    Working clean and wearing protective clothing, such as gloves and long sleeves, is the best way to reduce the need to expose your skin to any cleaning agent in the first place.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Still Above The Grass
    Posts
    6,167

    Default Re: Epoxy mini pump cleaning

    Throw those dang pumps away and never buy another set. Mix your epoxy by weight rather than by volume. It's simple, more accurate, and uses less supplies. No muss, no fuss, easy peasy.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    19,464

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryLL View Post
    Throw those dang pumps away and never buy another set. Mix your epoxy by weight rather than by volume. It's simple, more accurate, and uses less supplies. No muss, no fuss, easy peasy.
    This

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •