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Thread: Cooking with a hot plate.

  1. #1
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    Default Cooking with a hot plate.

    As promised (I think I promised) I tried using a 1300 watt hot plate using 2 of 12 volt 232 AH deep cycle batteries thru a 2500 watt inverter. I was able to cook 2 bowls of oatmeal, 2 open faced grilled cheese, 1 large hot drink, 1 big bowl of noodles, 1 can of soup and make 1 smoothy with the blender, all over 3 days time. I might have been able to get more out of them but we got tired of listening to the low voltage alarm on the inverter.

    That's a total of 464 AH. My plan is to use 3 of 55 AH AGM batteries in the big dory, about 35% of the energy, so won't be able to cook very much at once, maybe 1 bowl of oats, 1 grilled cheese and 1 hot drink per day, but it will be handy for sure. The more I use the outboard the more I can cook.

    The biggest thing I heat is about 3 liters of water for a shower. There will be a wood fired heater so that will be easy. If I want to do laundry I'll need to do it with water heated over a campfire I guess.

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Drawing most lead acid batteries down below 80% depth of discharge will shorten battery life considerably. Listening to the low voltage alarm can get expensive. having typed that, I looked up the chart below. It looks like you will have to use the hotplate quite a bit to kill an AGM battery. Perhaps I should temper my warning a bit since I doubt that you intend to use it every day for extended periods. I can't see this as a plan for most of us, but you must have thought it through for your needs and interests.

    http://www.fullwavemarine.com/AGMBatteryinfo.html


    1300 watts takes 108 amps at 12V using 3 batteries gets down to 36 amps each plus some for the inverter, so maybe 1-0 between the battery pack and the inverter?
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Would and induction hotplate be more efficient?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Thanks Dave.

    Nothing that I cooked took more than 10 minutes of "on" time, so 0.16H. As you pointed out the AGM's should last for a very long while, especially if the outboard is quiet enough that I don't mind charging while cooking. Also, there will be 3 batteries so total drawdown will be very little per battery.

    I'm more concerned with the inverter's ability to withstand the relatively hard use, and one thing for certain is that I will attempt to locate and disconnect that alarm.

    Trent,

    I had to look it up. It looks as though that would be more efficient indeed. Thanks for the suggestion.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Two twenty lb cylinders of propane would handle your cooking requirements for six months, other than the smoothie. I missed why you are not considering this. / Jim

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Jim,

    Hi again!

    If I don't have propane I won't need a bilge fan, something I would really want since there will be wood heat. I don't need much, and can cook on the tiny wood stove, but the hot plate is so easy, and I want the inverter for recharging and for the blender. I know, one can recharge directly from the 12 volts, and there are manual blenders available. I should probably rethink everything.

    As much as it would get used, and this is experience speaking, 20 lbs. would last at least 9 months. A little 10 pounder would be plenty, that and a small cast iron single burner.

    Too many options, but at least I know that the hot plate is viable. Sounds a bit neurotic. eh?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    It’sso neat that a hot plate is actually viable if you need it to be! Imay try some of this myself at some point, just to see how it comesout. If you decide to do any other “cooking with a –“adventures, I would love to hear about them! It can help people likeme who are looking to go on an extended camping trip at some point.Thanks friend!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    I never heard of a bilge fan. If you are leaking propane into your bilge you got big problems and a bilge fan is just the spark to set them off.


    Propane is great for boats you just need to put together a good system and really pay attention to the safety precautions from the aybs.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    A solar panel could help out with keeping your batteries charged up.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    It seems like many folks are using induction plates + Lithium Phosphate battery banks with success. The reason being propane can be hard to come by in some locations. Many of these boats can just use solar / wind (sunny locations and big panels)

    Cheers,
    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by sully75 View Post
    I never heard of a bilge fan. If you are leaking propane into your bilge you got big problems and a bilge fan is just the spark to set them off.


    Propane is great for boats you just need to put together a good system and really pay attention to the safety precautions from the aybs.
    Bilge blowers are pretty standard on gasoline powered boats.

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Ok yeah but if you have enough propane in your bilge to be a problem a fan isn't going to help much.

    Moving gasoline fumes is different from trying to get actual propane out of your bilge.

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by sully75 View Post
    Ok yeah but if you have enough propane in your bilge to be a problem a fan isn't going to help much.

    Moving gasoline fumes is different from trying to get actual propane out of your bilge.
    I think the idea is exactly the same as bilge blowers in petrol driven craft, to get fresh air into the bilge and expel the gases into a less combustible concentration. I have had gas on boats and never had an alarm or blower, but have always had a keen sense of smell for gas, and enough paranoia that the installation was right and regulary checked. I knew some people no longer with us due to a large tank leaking until all the gas hit the log burner......


    I have never considered electric, but with tech moving so fast, might be worth looking into. I always have carried a single burner primus and paraffin as a back-up,when it was not my main and generally preferred source, certainly in engineless boats or those with very little power production. Given a means of reliable amps, electric induction could be worth a look.

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    I have never considered electric, but with tech moving so fast, might be worth looking into.
    I'm not much of a cook but a SeaSwing with one of those alcohol backpacker things under it worked super for noodles, hot drinks, soup, rice dishes and so on. A couple gallons of alky lasts quite a while.

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    I'm not much of a cook but a SeaSwing with one of those alcohol backpacker things under it worked super for noodles, hot drinks, soup, rice dishes and so on. A couple gallons of alky lasts quite a while.
    A few gallons of paint thinner lasts even longer

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Ok yeah but if you have enough propane in your bilge to be a problem a fan isn't going to help much.
    I think you are right.

    In the US, according to ABYC standards, propane must be stored above the waterline in a locker that drains overboard, which supports the position that a bilge blower would not be sufficient to clear it.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sully75 View Post
    Ok yeah but if you have enough propane in your bilge to be a problem a fan isn't going to help much.

    Moving gasoline fumes is different from trying to get actual propane out of your bilge.
    My comment was more focussed on "I've never heard of a bilge fan, but they are clearly useless" It's the internet I guess.

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  18. #18
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    My comment was more focussed on "I've never heard of a bilge fan, but they are clearly useless" It's the internet I guess.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    Respectfully, no.

    If you're going to have propane on your boat you should do it the right way. That's a locker on the perimeter of your boat that vents off the boat with a solenoid that provides a positive stop so that propane is only filling the lines when the appliance is being used. Propane is heavier than air and will sink into the bilge. If you have so little faith in your system that you think that your bilge is going to occasionally fill up with propane, propane is a bad choice for you. A propane sniffer is definitely a wise choice, and I believe they make little handheld ones.

    Just randomly throwing a "bilge fan" at a problem that could blow you and your boat apart is pretty dumb. A gasoline engine gets a blower, but no, I'm not aware of a "bilge fan" being a normal or recommended part of a propane system.

    I believe this is a copy of the standards:
    https://law.resource.org/pub/us/cfr/....A-01.1993.pdf

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Gib
    How about just using a small camp stove with the little disposable cylinders?
    Not complicated enough...?

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    That's another good alternative Tim.

    Another is get small enough cooking pots to use on a Cubic Mini and just use the hotplate when it's more convenient now that I know that it's feasible.

    I'd like to just avoid explosives, except for gasoline for the outboard.

    I found this...

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tent-Stove-...oAAOSwWkddR2zA

    It allows for normal sized pots. May not ship to Canada though.

  21. #21
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    Good to know you actually have heard of a bilge fan Sully. I must have misunderstood when you said "I have never heard of a bilge fan"

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    I'm not much of a cook but a SeaSwing with one of those alcohol backpacker things under it worked super for noodles, hot drinks, soup, rice dishes and so on. A couple gallons of alky lasts quite a while.
    Thats why i have been a fan of parraffin, a 5 gallon jerry lasts a long time. I had more problems finding meths to pre-heat the burners, though these days, there are alternatives.

    As i have only seen the sun for 7 minutes in the last 10 days, i would be gagging for a cup of tea should i be relying on a solar bank to top my batteries up in order for a brew up.

    Also the hiss of a primus takes away the sound of my tinnitus. The little screw on camping gaz disposable containers are very handy (maybe Coleman in the US?) but they get to be expensive . I did cook on a single burner Trangia meths burner for 6 months, and that is something you can keep fueled up and in a pocket, i always have one of those onboard too.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    If I absolutely had to cook electrically, and depended on a battery, I'd have a small microwave.

    The Primus is a tough act to beat.
    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

  24. #24
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    We have a metho (alcohol) stove which we like, and a small microwave. We can run the microwave on low power through our 1000 watt inverter.

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Isn't there some gizmo that allows one to refill the little coleman canisters ?
    thought I saw that somewhere recently...

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by timo4352 View Post
    Isn't there some gizmo that allows one to refill the little coleman canisters ?
    thought I saw that somewhere recently...
    Yes, but the canisters are not designed with fatigue life in mind. The thin walls are safe enough for single use, but they will eventually crack if you refill them too many times. I have no idea how many. You would also have to know exactly how much they hold and how to avoid overfilling. If you over fill them, expansion of the liquid can easily generate enough pressure to break the container.

    There has been some discussion about bilge fans. They can handle the rate of fume generation from a gasoline leak, but a propane leak can easily overwhelm any reasonably sized vent fan.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

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    Quote Originally Posted by timo4352 View Post
    Isn't there some gizmo that allows one to refill the little coleman canisters ?
    thought I saw that somewhere recently...
    If you turn off your ad blocker it should come up on the forum now.

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  28. #28
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    Yes, but the canisters are not designed with fatigue life in mind. The thin walls are safe enough for single use, but they will eventually crack if you refill them too many times. I have no idea how many. You would also have to know exactly how much they hold and how to avoid overfilling. If you over fill them, expansion of the liquid can easily generate enough pressure to break the container.

    There has been some discussion about bilge fans. They can handle the rate of fume generation from a gasoline leak, but a propane leak can easily overwhelm any reasonably sized vent fan.
    A really good point. I boarded our boat recently and found the whole cabin stank like a shearing shed - which isn't all that unpleasant, fortunately. I found the source was a Lanolin spray can that had developed a tiny hole, presumably from rust but it wasn't at all obvious, and all the contents had spurted out. I'm glad it wasn't a propane can! I wouldn't leave any of those little propane cans on the boat. If I needed to, I'd store them in a strong, airtight container. Tupperware wouldn't work!

    Rick

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    A really good point. I boarded our boat recently and found the whole cabin stank like a shearing shed - which isn't all that unpleasant, fortunately. I found the source was a Lanolin spray can that had developed a tiny hole, presumably from rust but it wasn't at all obvious, and all the contents had spurted out. I'm glad it wasn't a propane can! I wouldn't leave any of those little propane cans on the boat. If I needed to, I'd store them in a strong, airtight container. Tupperware wouldn't work!

    Rick
    Check the MSDS. The propellant is usually butane. At least there is a lot less butane in the lanolin than there would have been in a fuel can. Is there any irony in the fact that a can of rust preventative rusted out?
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    I use a butane stove ($29.00) for the small amount of cooking we do on Festivus. Works pretty well. Hopefully a safe alternative.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldad View Post
    I use a butane stove ($29.00) for the small amount of cooking we do on Festivus. Works pretty well. Hopefully a safe alternative.
    This always surprised me. Compare the thickness of the canister on one if these to a proper gas bottle. Those cheap camping stoves explode from their own cooking heat. And rust. Not great. Not on a boat.

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    Check the MSDS. The propellant is usually butane. At least there is a lot less butane in the lanolin than there would have been in a fuel can. Is there any irony in the fact that a can of rust preventative rusted out?
    I think so - doesn't say a whole lot about lanolin as a rust preventative does it? But the issue seems to be that there just isn't enough irony in the canister!

    Rick

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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    I think so - doesn't say a whole lot about lanolin as a rust preventative does it? But the issue seems to be that there just isn't enough irony in the canister!

    Rick
    The lanolin was inside the can while the rust was forming on the outside. Maybe you could iron out the difficulty by getting it on both sides.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    This always surprised me. Compare the thickness of the canister on one if these to a proper gas bottle. Those cheap camping stoves explode from their own cooking heat. And rust. Not great. Not on a boat.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    Good to know. Used the same one for years with nary a problem, but you gave me something to think about. I better do some research.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Cooking with a hot plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    This always surprised me. Compare the thickness of the canister on one if these to a proper gas bottle. Those cheap camping stoves explode from their own cooking heat. And rust. Not great. Not on a boat.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    If its one of those hotplate types with the gas cartridge inserted laying down next to the plate, never a good design in my mind. The little butane camping gaz stoves always had the burner above the cannister, they at least never suffered from reflective heat in the same way the other type can . I met a French couple who had a large plastic box in an aft locker full of gaz cannisters, he coated each one with a film of vasaline. He found individually putting each one in a plastic bag usually ended up with them sweating, and rusting.



    Most Mini transat boats use the same burner in a gimble for boiling water for their freeze dried food......yum.

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