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Thread: Wooden Bullseye

  1. #1
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    Post Wooden Bullseye

    Hello - does anyone make and market round wooden bulls-eyes for the classic market? Or is this a bespoke product from wood craftsmen made to order? I see them on tallships and older classics - but cannot source them other than one Tufnol block which only comes in two sizes. I cannot find them online or in chandleries from the regular suppliers of wood blocks. Perhaps wood is not strong enough or has too much friction so that lines will create too much abrasion for wood eyes to be effective?
    Thanks for any info shared!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    https://shop.classicmarine.co.uk/rig...num-vitae.html
    Of course wood is adequate, and has been for hundreds of years.

    P.S. welcome to the forum. what boat?
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 09-21-2018 at 09:11 AM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    And welcome to the forum! Tell us about your boat. Pics would be great.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Pert Lowell. Not on your side of the pond, but I'd wager they'll ship, and I can testify that their products are top notch:

    http://www.pertlowell.com/wood/wood.html

    Alternately, find a local with a wood lathe in her shed, and get her to turn you a couple. They're not difficult; I've made quite a few.

    Now about those boat pics!

    Alex

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Bullseyes are easily turned on a wood lathe, although really proper serviceable ones will have to be made of very hard wood and usually are best machined on a metalworking lathe. Lignam vitae is the traditional wood of choice, but it has always been exceptionally expensive and today is listed as a potentially endangered species and is becoming very difficult to obtain. Black locust is being used as a replacement in the US currently.

  6. #6
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    Post Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne View Post
    Hello - does anyone make and market round wooden bulls-eyes for the classic market? Or is this a bespoke product from wood craftsmen made to order? I see them on tallships and older classics - but cannot source them other than one Tufnol block which only comes in two sizes. I cannot find them online or in chandleries from the regular suppliers of wood blocks. Perhaps wood is not strong enough or has too much friction so that lines will create too much abrasion for wood eyes to be effective?
    Thanks for any info shared!
    Ahhh....thank you everyone for the great insight! Iíll make my way over to Classic Marine in Ipswich. I must have missed this line on their website as I checked the site before.
    Sorry - no photos yet - I donít have a classic boat yet- but that is our plan in the future! Looking now for one that we can work on for our company classic mascot.
    Iíll keep you posted as we move on!
    Cheers- Suzanne

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    A trick I use for making bull's eyes is to first drill centering holes in a piece of lignum vitae of the desired thickness of the finished ring using a hole saw to mark the outer diameter on both sides. A round over router bit of the radius of the inner portion of the ring is chucked into either a router or drill press and used to produce the inner curved radius. The outer groove is made by placing the part on a tapered mandril that is chucked into my metal lathe allowing the outer groove to be cut. This method works well for making up several of the rings and provides a stable way to hold the work while shaping the inside before the pieces are cut free with the hole saw in the press. "Lizards and Bulls Eyes" are not all that hard to make once you get the process planned and set up. This is the flag halyard lizard that is on the starboard spreader of "Bright Star" The pice has a square groove cut to match the retaining band and the bottom is cut flat to fit the spreader better. Demeena line makes a halyard that really runs free though the lizard due to its low friction property.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 09-26-2018 at 02:07 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    ^ Never heard that called a lizard before. According to Paasch Illustrated marine Encyclopaedia a lizard is s length of rope with a thimble or bullseye spliced into one or both ends.
    To me that is a fairlead, or dumb sheave, depending on how your halyard is rove.

    Two nations separated by a common language again.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    I think we are both right Nick. On the West Coast a line leader or guide has been called a Lizard ever since before I first set foot on a deck. it can be either fixed or a line with a bulls eye spliced in the end as you describe! Incidentally, do you know what a "Wurlitzer" is in boat speak?
    Jay

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I think we are both right Nick. On the West Coast a line leader or guide has been called a Lizard ever since before I first set foot on a deck. it can be either fixed or a line with a bulls eye spliced in the end as you describe! Incidentally, do you know what a "Wurlitzer" is in boat speak?
    Jay
    It's a rope burn on your penis or scrotum.

    Probably derived from the Scottish "up to high doh" as the person who couched the saying likened the sound emitted by the victim as being similar to the high notes on a Wurlitzer organ.

    Organ!! Boom Boom.


    https://www.thefreedictionary.com/doh
    Last edited by Chippie; 09-27-2018 at 12:28 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    No! That is, defiantly, not the right answer!
    Jay

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    No! That is, defiantly, not the right answer!
    Jay
    And I have never heard of it either.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Oh sorry I forgot theI


    I thought the Boom Boom was a sufficient pointer fella's.

    I took your advice on your last post to me too Nick, and lightened up.



    Ah well.
    ---
    Last edited by Chippie; 09-28-2018 at 02:20 AM.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    A trick I use for making bull's eyes is to first drill centering holes in a piece of lignum vitae of the desired thickness of the finished ring using a hole saw to mark the outer diameter on both sides. A round over router bit of the radius of the inner portion of the ring is chucked into either a router or drill press and used to produce the inner curved radius. The outer groove is made by placing the part on a tapered mandril that is chucked into my metal lathe allowing the outer groove to be cut. This method works well for making up several of the rings and provides a stable way to hold the work while shaping the inside before the pieces are cut free with the hole saw in the press. "Lizards and Bulls Eyes" are not all that hard to make once you get the process planned and set up. This is the flag halyard lizard that is on the starboard spreader of "Bright Star" The pice has a square groove cut to match the retaining band and the bottom is cut flat to fit the spreader better. Demeena line makes a halyard that really runs free though the lizard due to its low friction property.
    Jay
    I trust you have some other way of rounding the outer edges of the bullseye besides a router. If you are hand-feeding the outside edge into a router bit, you've got a lot more nerve than I could muster!

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Wooden Bullseye

    Yes, smoothing the outer edges is done by mounting the bulls eye on an expanding mandril, mounting it in a metal lathe or drill press and as it turns, the piece is shaped with a wood rasp and sand paper free hand.

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