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Thread: What do you call this fastener?

  1. #1
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    Default What do you call this fastener?

    Often used for picture frames. What is it called, and where can I buy some?

    Frame fastener.jpg
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Google "corrugated joint fastener." They're available at the local hardware store, most likely.
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Decades ago I knew them as corrugated nails. I have no idea where to buy them anymore.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Looks like they are available at Home Depot, etc. Thanks for the nomenclature.
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

    Resistance is NOT futile.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Chip cutter

  6. #6
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Be advised that that fastener was put in with a specialized nail gun and if you try to hammer one into a small frame like that the results won't be so clean and neat.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Be advised that that fastener was put in with a specialized nail gun and if you try to hammer one into a small frame like that the results won't be so clean and neat.
    Just so. Many years ago, I worked in a production cabinet shop that used them to assemble face frames. They held together long enough (usually) to get them nailed to the carcase, and their taper did draw the joint-line together, but that was about all. The nail-gun used to shoot them was a hulking thing. Haven't seen them in use anywhere for a very long time.

    What are you trying to accomplish? There are probably better approaches.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    There is a manual insertion device that is used with these. (Come to think of it, I have no idea where mine is now.) It's an oblong tube the size of the staple. it is placed on the work piece surface and a staple is dropped into the oblong tube. On top of that a piece of metal which fits the inside of the tube is placed into the tube on top of the staple. The tube is held in place while the metal "driver" is struck with a hammer, thus driving the staple straight into the work piece without the staple crumpling or deforming. They used to provide these "gronicles" with the staples in a blister-pack "kit." I couldn't find any picture of them on line, so maybe they don't make them anymore. I'd think it would be near impossible to drive a corner staple neatly without one.
    Last edited by Bob Cleek; 09-18-2018 at 01:36 PM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    I tapped on the one in the pic with a hammer. Intending to use this to secure mitered frames. I do not have capacity to do biscuits.
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

    Resistance is NOT futile.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerarddm View Post
    I tapped on the one in the pic with a hammer. Intending to use this to secure mitered frames. I do not have capacity to do biscuits.
    Well, ya made a nice job of it!

  11. #11
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    You can use dowels instead of biscuits.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    none at Sebos?

  13. #13
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    You can also do splines. Tapping those fasteners into delicate parts is, indeed, pressing your luck a bit. You might do fine, but I'd count on some failures.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  14. #14
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Hmm, splines, yes, I will have to run a test or two.

    Picked up a package of the corrugated fasteners today as insurance.
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

    Resistance is NOT futile.

  15. #15
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    Default What do you call this fastener?

    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  16. #16
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Don't forget that those corrugated fasteners which are primarily intended for low-quality construction and soft wood, have wicked tendency of split chunks off the ends of the mitered cuts. I sure would never use them for any kind of finish work, nor in the marine environment. They are ferrous metal and in the damp will rust and bust everything apart when the rust swells up.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    I set up a picture framing shop for a GF some years ago. One of the bits of kit was a pneumatic gismo that held the cut frames at right angle while pushing one of those wiggle bits in, no glue.

    As for not having a biscuit cutter, I bought a router bit that does the same. Fraction of the cost and while not quite as versatile as a dedicated machine, does good work. Came with two blades, so can cut double for two biscuits, made by Trend.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    I have worked as a restorer and framer for 40 years and never come across one of these. Used to see them in UK many moons ago but only ever used for knocking up packing cases and crude formwork and crates. must admit I never saw them with the insertion tool, that would be a good idea.
    What Andrews's talking about is an underpinner, that doesn't have to be pneumatic. Mine is free standing, works with a foot lever, but there are bench mounted ones . The principal is the same, the frame is placed face up on the bed, as you press down a rubber cushioned arm comes down onto the face and a sliding pusher pushes the pin or V nailup into the underside . The whole thing is adjustable for different profiles and mouldings and will deal with up to 2 x 3 50 x 75 but there are bigger ones. The work can be slid forwards to put in multiple pins across the mitre and if you dont move the frame and repeat, the pins can be pushed in at the same spot two or three times. just saw in a Axminster Tools catalogue, there's a hand pusher you strike with a hammer.
    definitely use a spot of glue. The idea is with a Morso type guillotine and an underpinner there's no dust or sawing and hammering, The thirty second picture frame was one supplier's promo. One advantage is as the v nail is 90 it always goes in with the grain so you can use it on hardwood.P1020647.jpgP1020648.jpg
    'C'est la vie' say the old folks it goes to show you never can tell

  19. #19
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerarddm View Post
    I tapped on the one in the pic with a hammer. Intending to use this to secure mitered frames. I do not have capacity to do biscuits.
    Do you have a router?

    The Green Bear will let you have this for $30:



    ETA: I see Andrew 2 beat me to it.

    BTW, the size of the slot-cutter should be 5/32".
    Last edited by oznabrag; 09-22-2018 at 02:13 AM.
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  20. #20
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    Default Re: What do you call this fastener?

    We still use these corrugated fasteners in the construction of scenery for feature films, TV, commercials, etc. The air-powered gun that holds a "stick" of 50-60 nails runs a few hundred dollars, unless you can find one on e-bay or some similar sites.
    "Simplicity, Clarisse! First principles..."

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