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Thread: Always have a life preserver

  1. #176
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,032

    Default Re: Always have a life preserver

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    The water around here does get cold, i believe winter temps go down to about 17 degrees Centigrade.
    This is amusing, and shows how widely varying perspectives can be. 17C is early summer temps around here (Wisconsin), a little cool for optimal open water swimming but comfy enough for 2-3 hours immersion at a time. That's with just a swimming suit.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  2. #177
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,282

    Default Re: Always have a life preserver

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    I have a thing about good v's bad laws.
    All laws are absurd at some point, (hence the presidential pardon). A good law will only be absurd in unusual situations, say 5% of the time. A bad law will sometimes be absurd in normal conditions, so say 20% of the time. Having to wear a PDF in a tender is absurd about 50% of the time.

    I am not against wearing PDF's, just against the law determining i have to wear one when i clearly don't.
    Well said, that. I feel that I have a better understanding of when I, or a passenger on my boat, needs additional protection than some legislator who may well never ave been ​on a boat.

  3. #178
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    magnolia springs, alabama u.s.a.
    Posts
    13,242

    Default Re: Always have a life preserver

    I don't ever remember sailing with a life jacket in 30-plus years of sailing both offshore and around the marks, UNTIL I got a Finn. You have to wear a jacket in Finn races, so it kind of forces you to go find a good one that fits, that you can actually wear, and I can promise you, you can drown even wearing a life jacket. And I don't mean in a force whatever gale. I mean getting your big arse wet with a sea running just a couple of feet in a jacket without leg straps to keep it from riding up.

    I have almost drowned three or four times racing sailboats. I have been to the point of 'please God, please someone help me'. Two of those times I was wearing a life jacket most people would consider an extravagance (about $300 US), but let me say this about that: I am still here. I am typing this. I am almost positive that if I wasn't wearing that jacket I would not be. I'd have been dead years ago, drowning either in Mobile Bay, or in the Atlantic of Fort Lauderdale.

    Now I wouldn't consider leaving home without one. Carry one in each of my vehicles, just in case, and if I am ever sailing alone, I have it on.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  4. #179
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    honolulu,hawaii,usa
    Posts
    195

    Default Re: Always have a life preserver

    For those rare circumstances and mindsets that need the most minimal pfd, you can find inflatables that are small as a a fist attached to a single waistbelt. To be US legal in a non-nanny state, it has to be worn and not stowed. Mine doesn't automatically pop the CO2, since I expect to be drenched on deck anyway. It is important to find pictures or a video of exactly how it deploys so you know whether to put some part around your neck or whatever. My super minimal one simply deploys a cube with no headrest, but it is either that small or nothing for certain needs.

    I think the most overlooked justification for wearing (not stowing) a preferably substantial pfd is exhaustion. In my case I can swim a mile at leasure and handle 40f water after the initial cold shock. But what I increasingly cannot handle is exhaustion, which may come from multiple efforts to deal with chaos. Here is an example of a flipping a Sunfish in SF Bay which is recovered rather well late in the 3rd minute, but deteriorates into more flips until the camera poops out and you have to read comments for the death knell. Note how things without lanyards get lost, and things with lanyards tangle and strangle - anarchy.


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