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Thread: Mooring Swing Radius

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Portsmouth, NH. USA
    Posts
    30

    Default Mooring Swing Radius

    In determining the appropriate swing radius should consideration be made for boats that for some reason get oriented such that the direction from bow to stern of each boat is 180 degrees from each other. The worst case scenario would be when two boats have their stern at the closest possible distance. This would be unusual but could happen. I do know that if this was a clear cut standard that was required by all authorities, that it would not be met in just about every mooring field I have seen up and down the US Atlantic coast.

    Thanks in advance for any clarification.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    15,733

    Default Re: Mooring Swing Radius

    Most mooring fields have a harbormaster, or other person, knowledgeable in mooring construction, the vagaries of the local weather and water, and how both of those effect different kinds of boats. There's little apparent spacing consistency because these persons or authorities apply their considerable experience in maximizing use of the real estate.

    If no such official person or authority exists in your area, I suggest seeking the help of a knowledgeable boat owner who moors a boat right where you intend to. She or he will know how the tides and winds will affect a boat like yours located in that specific harbor.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Olympia, WA, USA
    Posts
    2,139

    Default Re: Mooring Swing Radius

    Yes, in theory, the mooring radii should not overlap. But I have yet to see theory and practice coincide on that point.

    The worst case scenario would be when two boats have their stern at the closest possible distance. This would be unusual but could happen.
    Not unusual at all, in my experience. At the tide current change, or in eddies, or when one boat lies to tide and the other to wind, it is pretty common. I saw it in Maine, where I grew up, and I see it here in WA. Unfortunately...

    it would not be met in just about every mooring field I have seen up and down the US Atlantic coast.
    ...That's pretty accurate. Fortunately, in those instances, what seems most common is for the boat lying bow-to-current to be blown forward, away from the stern of the boat lying bow-to-wind --who is, in turn, pushed somewhat forward by the current. I've certainly seen boats bump each other, but it doesn't seem too frequent an occurance. However, it always seems tragedy is averted more by luck than by design.

    I consider myself fortunate that my boat is so small that even in the pack-'em-in mooring patterns I've visited we still swing clear. Another 20' of length and it might not be so simple.

    Alex

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