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Thread: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Quote Originally Posted by jonboy View Post
    Meanwhile..... It looks like Romano Fenati is going to charged with attempted murder….
    I can't see that sticking. Riders come off at that speed on a reasonably regular basis, without major injury. If he did it where the other rider would hit something if he came off, yeah
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Racism is certainly part of what it's about --

    ......snip.... In the high-profile, racist cartoon that emerged after the US Open, Osaka wasn’t even depicted at all — a nondescript blonde player was drawn in her place. Erasing Osaka’s own Blackness .... snip
    Rubbish. Osaka had bleached hair.

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    I've warned you before. You are really too old for that level of contortion. You're gonna end up in traction.
    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I've warned you before. You are really too old for that level of contortion. You're gonna end up in traction.
    I was going to ignore the inanity of your comment, but Janet, a favourite columnist of mine, has a far better way of pigeonholing you and your position:

    Hypocrisy damns censorious mob’s offence over Serena Williams


    Mark Knight in his studio with the Serena Williams tantrum cartoon. Picture: David Geraghty


    Speaking to rallying students in Berlin in 1918 soon after they deposed a university chancellor, *Albert Einstein said: “All true democrats must stand guard lest the old class tyranny of the Right be replaced by a new class tyranny of the Left.” A biography on *Einstein recounts that he told the students that his socialist sentiments did not make him sympathetic to Soviet-style controls.

    Twenty-five years later, with Hitler and the Nazis in power, Einstein reminisced with a friend about that day: “Do you still remember the occasion … when we went together to the Reichstag building, convinced that we could turn the people there into honest democrats? How naive we were for men of 40.”

    One hundred years later, a different tyranny has taken hold. The self-described “progressive” class — a misnomer of epic proportions — is strangling modern liberalism. And it means true democrats must stand up for liberty.

    The latest instalment of democracy in decline is the global hysteria over a cartoon. If this were simply a case of misdirected outrage, maybe we could move on, laugh at the humourless and deride those who don’t understand caricature.

    But this signals more evidence that modernity is on a knife edge. We risk serious cultural decay if this keeps up. After all, big societal shifts happen incrementally, and illiberalism is no exception. This week, the self-appointed cultural dietitians mobbed Herald Sun cartoonist Mark Knight because he drew a cartoon about a bullying tennis player. Critiquing a cartoon is one thing. Aiming to censor a cartoonist with accusations of racism and sexism is illiberal.

    Last week, a similar mob used online outrage to target the New Yorker magazine for including Steve Bannon in its annual talkfest. New Yorker editor David Remnick, a robust critic of the Trump administration, had promised to apply a torch to Bannon.

    “I have every intention of asking him difficult questions and engaging in a serious and even combative conversation,” Remnick told The New York Times.
    “The audience itself, by its presence, puts a certain pressure on a conversation. You can’t jump on and off the record.”

    The cultural dietitians chose to apply pressure on Remnick instead, to shut down the conversation. And the journalist — the journalist — surrendered to these regressive calls.

    In Australia last week illiberal censors tried to shut down Nigel Farage from speaking by calling him a racist. This time they failed. But more often they succeed. That they are routinely assisted by pusillanimous people who are meant to be frontline defenders of a robust marketplace of ideas points to the depth of cultural rot.


    Steve Bannon.

    Germaine Greer was uninvited from the Brisbane Writers Festival last month because she is too controversial. A course on Western civilisation was thrown out by Australian National University censors a few months ago, and a similar group is determined to do the same at the University of Sydney. On Monday, there were security guards outside a faculty meeting because academics and students were discussing a draft memorandum of understanding for a partnership with the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation. If they agree to a course on the great books of literature, will Sydney University need to call in the army to ensure lessons proceed?

    If we fob off each episode as crazy nonsense, we risk not joining the dots on the constraints on our freedoms to think, write, speak and, in this most recent instance, draw freely. The fact we have an annual Festival of Dangerous Ideas, which this year is devoted to how we engage with one another, surely signals the corrosion of our cultural health.

    Despite mounting evidence, many still wave away as illusory “tiresome culture wars” and battles against political correctness and mock concerns about limiting free expression. That is how *illiberalism spreads: from a lack of understanding and a failure of imagination.

    Consider Knight’s cartoon. Most people saw a funny drawing of a big black female tennis player with frizzy hair and big lips who wears cutesy tennis outfits having a tantrum on court, overshadowing her young Japanese opponent Naomi Osaka, and bullying the umpire. Was he meant to draw a petite Serena Williams with straight hair and thin lips, wearing a conservative tennis outfit?

    No. The message from critics is that a white man will be mobbed for making fun of a black female. In the unthinking world of identity politics, power necessarily rests with men, first a male umpire, then a male cartoonist, regardless of the riches, profile or power of Wil*liams. As a member of the historical oppressor class, Knight should have stuck to his knitting. Send up a white male tennis player, by all means, which the Herald Sun cartoonist did days earlier. The mob had nothing to say about Knight’s cartoon of a sulking Nick Kyrgios.

    But a black female rang alarm bells, telling them to slice and dice and parse a cartoon according to race and sex, and myriad other group identities. They trawled through history to draw frankly ridiculous parallels with the Jim Crow era and minstrel show characters from the 1890s.

    If we are to look at our sorry history of racism, perhaps compare it with the modern idea that a white man cannot draw a cartoon making fun of a black woman for having a tantrum during the US Open final. That is a more dangerously prejudiced position, treating people differently according to skin colour — one protected, the other fair game for abuse.

    The online mob gets worked up by a cartoon but cannot harness the same passion about the facts of indigenous disadvantage. Two teenage boys, 16 and 17 years old, drowned in Perth’s Swan River this week while on the run from police. They had barely been to school for three years. Just two more stories of tragic family dysfunction.

    But virtue-signalling offence about a cartoon, speaking in sound bites and epithets are much easier than thinking about serious issues, let alone seeking solutions. And the law, section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, makes it easier still to go from zero to outrage over a cartoon.

    On that note, I looked to the heavens and thought of Bill Leak last week when an email arrived announcing that Gillian Triggs, the former boss of the Australian Human Rights Commission, was on a national tour called Speaking Up. It is also the name of her autobiography. Alas, Triggs is not a genuine believer in speaking up, except if you agree with her. Otherwise, please be quiet. Anything else is incongruous from a woman who said: “Sadly, you can say what you like around the kitchen table at home.” Leak would have had fun with that one.


    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    .... conclusion of that piece:

    The liberal project, founded on universal rights regardless of race, creed, gender, sexuality and other markers of group identity, is being turned on its head by this emerging age of outrage. And the anger is not limited to one or another side of politics. For every action, there is often an equal and opposite reaction. Trump supporters have harnessed their own fury. White identity politics is a thing now. And Barack Obama campaigning in the mid-terms trying to drum up minority support for Democrats just may mobilise two Trump supporters for every black person he speaks to.

    Pauline Hanson chases the media to register her rage. This week she called a nine-year old girl from Kenmore South State School a “brat” and suggested she be kicked out of school for refusing to stand for the national anthem.

    Harper Nielsen says she doesn’t like the words “we are young” in Advance Australia Fair because it marginalises indigenous cultures, which are the longest continuous civilisations in existence. Hanson, on the other hand, appears to have a problem with the word “free” in the anthem.

    Delivering the Wriston lecture last year, Jonathan Haidt identified several ways to counter what he calls “centrifugal forces” that drive people into groups, bunkered down in polarised positions. We need to diagnose the problem, for starters. As Haidt said, there is no getting around the fact we are evolved from tribal primates. “We love tribal living so much that we invented sports, fraternities, street gangs, fan clubs and tattoos,” he said. Social media cements tribes, encouraging people to inhale daily the mind-numbing fumes of furious agreement. So, we must look for ways to thwart our tribal tendencies, and understand that a focus on diversity can be another centrifugal force that drives people into separate groups.

    We need to open young minds to the wonder of new and challenging ideas. Haidt and others have developed the OpenMind app to do this. And he is behind the Heterodox Academy, too, where 1400 academics across the political spectrum are standing up for free thinking.

    We need to build greater resilience in younger kids, says Haidt, allowing them to navigate the world more freely. If they experience failure and solve problems in childhood we prevent them joining the marketplace of outrage where victims vie for top billing. LetGrow.org, set up by Lenore Skenazy, is working along those lines. Haidt’s conclusion is a fitting one for a week when a censorious mob across the globe came after an Australian cartoonist.

    “Be alarmed,” Haidt says, “the situation is truly alarming.” But do not despair because plenty of good people are working to defuse the age of outrage.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    The best lies ever told are built around a kernal of truth -- Capt. Flint
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    If there's a progressive class, can the regressive class be far away?

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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    That's a bit silly. As the right proves over and over, political allegorization of humor results in dead jokes. And all non-bland comedians make false steps, like Bill Maher's unfortunate gag about "even Indians" can make money from casinos. But this cartoon stepped from being pointed to being racist in the simple matter of making Williams' lips huge and bright red. All he had to do instead would have been a caricature based on her actual face in anger.


  10. #45
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    That's a bit silly. As the right proves over and over, political allegorization of humor results in dead jokes. And all non-bland comedians make false steps, like Bill Maher's unfortunate gag about "even Indians" can make money from casinos. But this cartoon stepped from being pointed to being racist in the simple matter of making Williams' lips huge and bright red. All he had to do instead would have been a caricature based on her actual face in anger.

    I've been ridiculed on this forum for my large nose.... and, btw, her lips are huge. Neither issue has anything to do with race / racism.

    Edit.... was my "brown" (she's whiter than me), Asian, Islamic girlfriend being racist today, when she called me a "bule"?

    Wiki: Bule (pronounced [ˈbule]) is a commonly used word in Indonesia to describe a foreigner, especially people of European descent. It seeks to identify people featuring light hair color, light eye color and pale skin. Some Europeans in Indonesia consider Bule derogatory, racist and offensive.[1] It may also be used by Indonesians as a rationale for justifying racist behavior, such as charging higher prices and expecting Bules to all be affluent with a resulting expectation to pay the higher prices.
    Last edited by The Bigfella; 09-16-2018 at 06:42 AM.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Who you calling Big Lips?


  12. #47
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    Who you calling Big Lips?

    It's not you lips I would make central to your caricature....

    .... and it wasn't mine that an Asian female friend (who is just that, a friend) commented on over dinner recently, in Chiang Mai.

    "Hmmmm..... big hands........"
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    And.... it's good to see another cartoonist comment on the issue. He's spot on.

    Mark Knight’s Serena Williams cartoon: truth erased as mob draws lazy conclusions


    Mark Knight’s cartoon of Serena Williams’ dummy spit.


    • By JOHN SPOONER


    About 50 years ago a fashionable topic emerged among my undergraduate friends and colleagues. Humans were said to have “lost” the prehistoric ability to read the thoughts of others through mental telepathy.

    This glorious lost faculty was said to still exist in the minds of some gifted individuals. Even the Soviet military and the CIA were said to be studying this phenomenon for obvious tactical reasons.

    The proposed “revival” of this vestigial power revolted me. It seemed obvious that common possession of this power would drive us all insane.

    Imagine the horror of rush hour train travel. You’re stuck in a confined space full of strangers whose every thought is loud in your ears. Vile insults, hatred, envy and simmering anger mixed with endless boring platitudes and nagging inanities. Of course there’d be kindness and humour sprinkled throughout.

    If this latent power were allowed to grow, then society would disintegrate. Social trust and harmonious discourse would be impossible. How would politics survive?

    The return of the Roman mob would disturb every aspect of our lives. Freedom of speech would be gradually suffocated in the chaotic smog of relentless acrimony. Thank goodness, I thought, that we have a well established independent media staffed by dedicated editors and reporters sifting and analysing the endless cacophony of news. Our cartoonists and columnists are surely a constant venting device for political discontent.

    But wait. In some weird sense we now know what everyone is thinking. Everyone is attached to an electronic connection to everyone’s hourly thoughts.
    Isn’t the cacophony of social media overwhelming our sifting and analysis right now? What has happened to all that venting and moderation?

    The media seems increasingly locked in a deadly struggle with a myriad of confident opponents. This virtual facsimile of the mob hits journalism like mass ESP. A continuous onslaught of tribalism and group think scattered through the democratic miracle of the internet.

    When the social media gets agitated, professional journalism feels the uneasy temptation to jump to the vanguard of the mob. To assert authority. With honourable exceptions, a lot of erstwhile respected journalism is now stuck in the scary crush of that peak hour carriage. No good sticking your fingers in your ears. Journalism just has to listen and learn to survive without shouting. Every mainstream journalist has to be careful so as not to “offend” the feelings of a yet to be identified “victim”. Even the most well meaning throwaway line can be instantly turned into a simple noose.

    This brings me to the cartoonist’s dilemma. I’m thinking of the spectacular injury and troubles inflicted on cartoonist Bill Leak and, most recently, the Herald Sun’s Mark Knight. Two of the most gifted and admirable people I’ve ever met. Bill’s life was ruined by a combination of murderous Islamist threat and insidious defamation by the Australian Human Rights Commission. Now another crowd of cowards is going after Mark.

    Political cartoonists are valued for the quality of their intentions. Whether their purpose is merely humorous or some deeper motive depends on many things. The moral or ethical seriousness of the political issue is important. There is no point drawing a distorted portrait of someone unless you have a purpose. The notable exception to this rule would be the whimsical drawings of non-political artists like Soutine or Dobell.

    Now that phrenology has been discredited, we can no longer judge human personality by the shape of someone’s head, their tight lips or a prominent nose. The context of the caricature is everything. I’m not discounting the fun of lampooning the unfortunate arse or villainous eyebrow of some tyrant or mountebank. Caricaturing Al Gore can be fun.

    A caricature can often carry a coded understanding of a common perception. Think of Trump. But insulting Donald’s parrot fish mouth and orange hair doesn’t tell us much. It’s important to carefully watch what he’s doing for the manufacturing workers. Focusing on his pseudo Buddhist hand gestures might obscure his attempts to smash the renewable energy scam. Similarly, by paying too much attention to the caricaturist’s gift in Peter Dutton may obscure the benefit of Malcolm Turnbull’s fortunate departure.

    Political cartoonists shouldn’t worry about taste. It’s the quality of the idea that counts and to hell with the social media mob.

    If possible, the mob should be mocked. A cartoonist will often notice that the leader of the mob is holding the not very aristocratic head of a mouse on his pike. The cackling harpies around the guillotine will be knitting reusable shopping bags.

    In the Serena Williams cartoon, the idiocy of Mark’s critics is obvious. They are wilfully reluctant to confront their racism. What on earth is going on in the minds of these predatory fools? What bad faith it is to dredge up the slime imagery of remote propaganda soaked in the historic disgrace of slavery.

    I think the answer lies in the pathetic moral laziness of the mob; frustrated by thwarted ambition, consumed by venomous envy and craving their 15 minutes of fame. I can picture some neo-Marxist troublemaker languishing in the neglected cell of a failed digital opinion site. Someone has to pay for all his humiliating personal failure. Nobody notices him until he starts to publicly abuse a brilliant cartoonist for transgressing some obscure law of satirical exaggeration.

    Mark’s intention was clear. He can’t stand bad sports. In fact, didn’t Williams’ antics resemble bullying? She wanted her way and to hell with the rules. The cartoon was not interested in her gender. In an earlier cartoon about John McEnroe, Mark described him as a “moron”. Serena was treated as fairly as any bad sport deserves. The Mob now wants us to recognise a new category of victimisation. Bullies have rights. They have sensitivities that demand protection. Maybe they need compensation as well as an apology.

    All this pseudo compassionate rancour has to stop. Social media should return to what it does best; cheerful socialising and supporting a favourite football team. Cartoonists should be encouraged to continue whispering truth in the ear of the emperor.

    John Spooner is a former cartoonist at The Age and author of What the Hell Was He Thinking? John Spooner’s Guide to the 21st Century.

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Oh... and elsewhere:

    Moto2 rider Romano Fenati has been suspended by his country's motorcycling federation (FMI) and had his licence revoked.
    The Italian shocked the sport by grabbing a rival's brake lever while racing at speed in at the San Marino Grand Prix on Sunday.
    The 22-year-old's contract with the Marinelli Snipers team had already been terminated following the astonishing incident at Misano.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Got it. Those who object to the racist use of minstrel lips are the racists. Good to know.

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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    Got it. Those who object to the racist use of minstrel lips are the racists. Good to know.
    Minstrel lips? What on earth?

    You guys have lost the plot
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,

    wasn't this thread supposed to be about :
    Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph ?

    Don't worry I'm happy

    "The law is what we have to live with.
    Justice is sometimes harder to achieve."

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  18. #53
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    Default Re: Romano Fenati puts the brakes on at 135 mph,



    The OP got to "Serena Williams's bitchy little outburst" in less than ten words.

    https://www.creativespirits.info/ima...how-poster.jpg

    I could not get the pic to post. To see something of the history of racist minstrel shows in Australia with a pic of the stereotype of big red lips, see https://www.creativespirits.info/abo...minstrel-shows

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