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Thread: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

  1. #1
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    Default Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Hi folks, a longtime reader but first time poster. I will be building an 18 foot sharpie skiff based on the HC Skiff 18 plans of Jim Michalak. Michalak's plans are taken directly from Howard Chapelle's 18' foot Cape Cod Oystering Skiff depicted in "American Small Sailing Craft".
    Attachment 22326hcskiff2.gif

    I previously built Phil Bolger's 14' June Bug and have decided it's time to take a step-up. I have two questions. The first is whether this boat will support a cat-ketch rig instead of the single mast, leg-o-mutton Jim's and Chapelle's plans call for. I've seen a lot of other cat ketches of this size and smaller like B&B's Bay River Skiff and CoreSound 15 and 17, CMD's Catbird 16, and John Gardner's 18 and 20' Shag in "Building Classic Sail Craft", so it looks like this wouldn't be a stretch. Just move the main mast up to the stem and secure the mizzen aft of the rather large centerboard. Jim lists the empty weight of the HC Skiff at 450 lbs so I think I should be able to get the sail plan math to work out a pretty well balanced rig that won't overpower the boat.

    The larger concern for me is the skeg shown on the plans. My question is can I leave this off. My reason for this is lessening the boat's draft. The skeg appears to add quite a bit of draft to the vessel. This will be a trailer boat so I wonder if the skeg will make launching off a boat ramp more difficult. I'm well aware of the skeg's purpose in preventing lateral motion but still wonder about its necessity. The Bolger June Bug had nothing but a pivoting leeboard and kick-up rudder and had no problem beating upwind or on reaches. Those flat Bolger sides dug in like a V-bottom once the boat heeled over to head upwind.

    Also attached is the plan of Mystic Seaport's 15' sharpie "WB". From "87 Boat Designs: A Catalog of Small Boat Plans from Mystic Seaport.) I am quite enamored of this vessel which to me is pretty close to perfect for my needs.

    wb pic.png




    It no longer sails at Mystic but I was directed to a storage area where I was able to take some pictures of it up on blocks. As you can see from the picture the bottom has nothing but a centerboard slot and a balanced rudder. (Which I plan to change to a kick-up style based on Reuel Parker's plans.)

    Attachment 22324


    Frankly I doubt that I have the skills necessary to build the "WB" traditionally based on the plans I obtained from Mystic Seaport. I have no doubt I can handle Jim Michalak's plywood version of the HC Skiff, but I really would like to have the cat ketch rig and drop the skeg, which would make it pretty close to the "WB" just longer. And yet in the back of my mind there's something telling me that if I mess with the Michalak/Chapelle plans to get something closer to the "WB" I'll end up with something with the worst qualities of both.

    Any comments, warnings, encouragement, or ridicule gladly accepted.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    The skeg provides a lot of the lateral plane, getting rid of it will cause a major change in the balance of the boat. I'd leave it on.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    I could be wrong but I believe that I read in Parker's sharpie book and/or in Harry Sucher's Flat bottomed boat book that in addition to steering, the large balanced rudders on New Haven style sharpies provide a good deal of lateral resistance that would otherwise be provided by a skeg. So that mght be an issue if you change the rudder configuration on the WB. Unfortunately I d9n't have access to my copies of the books at this time so I can't confirm it.
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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianY View Post
    I could be wrong but I believe that I read in Parker's sharpie book and/or in Harry Sucher's Flat bottomed boat book that in addition to steering, the large balanced rudders on New Haven style sharpies provide a good deal of lateral resistance that would otherwise be provided by a skeg. So that mght be an issue if you change the rudder configuration on the WB. Unfortunately I d9n't have access to my copies of the books at this time so I can't confirm it.
    Went back to read Parker. I couldn't find this but he does say that off the wind, skegs track better with much less attention to the helm, while the skegless boats are more responsive, slightly faster and require a lot more helm attention. It looks like the skeg gives you an easier rudder installation too.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by graystork44 View Post
    Went back to read Parker. I couldn't find this but he does say that off the wind, skegs track better with much less attention to the helm, while the skegless boats are more responsive, slightly faster and require a lot more helm attention. It looks like the skeg gives you an easier rudder installation too.
    I found my copy of the Sucher book and I misremembered the bit about the rudder and the sharpies. He said "Most sharpies were built without skeg a which enhanced their maneuverability when coupled with the long balanced rudders which gave them great leverage in turning." So, never mind.
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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    My wife and I sailed that 15 ft sharpie when it was in the boat livery at Mystic. I loved it. I wish they would put it back there.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Build it with the skeg. Sail it, beach it use it.

    After those experiences, you will be in the best position to judge whether you want a skeg or not. And if you don't want it, cut it down.

    Kevin
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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by ahp View Post
    My wife and I sailed that 15 ft sharpie when it was in the boat livery at Mystic. I loved it. I wish they would put it back there.

    So jealous ahp. Any recollections?

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    I live in very skinny water where a couple inches more draft on a boat this size is a big deal. I'd leave the skeg off and enjoy the shallower draft and easier launching and beaching. Even an old El Toro pram I had with a small skeg was a hassle around the shore compared to an optimus pram without skeg.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    I live in very skinny water where a couple inches more draft on a boat this size is a big deal. I'd leave the skeg off and enjoy the shallower draft and easier launching and beaching. Even an old El Toro pram I had with a small skeg was a hassle around the shore compared to an optimus pram without skeg.
    I've owned and sailed the 18' sharpie skiff from American Small Sailing Craft, and found that the skeg version was just fine on beaches. The El Toro's daggerboard stubs as you come into a beach, and the rudder stubs if you pull up the daggerboard, but my skiff could sail right up onto the beach with the centerboard swinging up on its own.=. The skeg prevented damage to the rudder.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I've owned and sailed the 18' sharpie skiff from American Small Sailing Craft, and found that the skeg version was just fine on beaches. The El Toro's daggerboard stubs as you come into a beach, and the rudder stubs if you pull up the daggerboard, but my skiff could sail right up onto the beach with the centerboard swinging up on its own.=. The skeg prevented damage to the rudder.
    johnw did you launch much from a trailer? That's the only way my boat will get to the water, and that's what originally concerned me about the skeg. Also what's your evaluation of the 18' skiff?

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by graystork44 View Post
    johnw did you launch much from a trailer? That's the only way my boat will get to the water, and that's what originally concerned me about the skeg. Also what's your evaluation of the 18' skiff?
    I loved that boat. I didn't own a trailer, and it was cross-planked, so once I got it in the water I kept it there. It was roomy, sailed very well, even rowed passably. You could launch off a flatbed trailer without difficulty, but I do recommend building in plywood if it's to live on a trailer.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I've owned and sailed the 18' sharpie skiff from American Small Sailing Craft, and found that the skeg version was just fine on beaches. The El Toro's daggerboard stubs as you come into a beach, and the rudder stubs if you pull up the daggerboard, but my skiff could sail right up onto the beach with the centerboard swinging up on its own.=. The skeg prevented damage to the rudder.
    Sure, bring your sharpie down to Florida and see how things change. I spend some time in Bellevue and your waters are totally different (deeper) than mine in Florida. I sail where the water deepens about 12" every 50'-75' out from shore. Launch ramps are so shallow you have to pick them carefully if using a float on trailer of any size boat...otherwise you use a tilt trailer or drag it off/on a float on. I agree the skeg isn't an issue if it stays in deep enough water and all you do is put the bow on the beach.

    I'm from the school that pulls rudders and boards up before beaching and the best way I know to lodge a board hard is to let the bottom push it up. I drill small boards for a quick pin insertion to hold the boards up for hassle free beaching...its faster and easier than pulling all the way out. I've owned two 32' sharpies and bought them for their shallow draft. Adding a deep skeg on sharpies defeats their best attribute. Before I built a sharpie with deep skeg I'd build a conventional hull with the same draft and get overall better performance.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    Sure, bring your sharpie down to Florida and see how things change. I spend some time in Bellevue and your waters are totally different (deeper) than mine in Florida. I sail where the water deepens about 12" every 50'-75' out from shore. Launch ramps are so shallow you have to pick them carefully if using a float on trailer of any size boat...otherwise you use a tilt trailer or drag it off/on a float on. I agree the skeg isn't an issue if it stays in deep enough water and all you do is put the bow on the beach.

    I'm from the school that pulls rudders and boards up before beaching and the best way I know to lodge a board hard is to let the bottom push it up. I drill small boards for a quick pin insertion to hold the boards up for hassle free beaching...its faster and easier than pulling all the way out. I've owned two 32' sharpies and bought them for their shallow draft. Adding a deep skeg on sharpies defeats their best attribute. Before I built a sharpie with deep skeg I'd build a conventional hull with the same draft and get overall better performance.
    Well, I certainly understand that my waters are different from those of Florida. So are the waters of New Jersey, where Graystork will be using the boat. My experience going into silty inlets like Jud Creek out on Vashon is that the boat sails right up onto the beach. Most sharpies without a skeg have a balanced rudder unprotected by a skeg, and don't actually draw less water. I suppose you could put a kick-up rudder on one, but it would help if the boat was designed for it, and would therefore balance properly. Just taking the skeg off an existing design risks adding a lot of weather helm, which could hurt the boat's performance and make it harder to control. If you take the skeg off, you have to revisit the entire design.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    The skeg can work with the trailer no problem. Set up like this mine works just fine.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Well Michalak's plans arrived today and one of my concerns about the skeg has been eliminated. The boat is 450 lbs empty and losing a little weight wouldn't have bothered me. I thought the skeg might be unnecessary weight. Well it's not, it's actually hollow and fills with water when underway. It's two pieces of quarter inch plywood sandwiched around a 1'1/2" square stern log and aft keel. It has holes at each of the three vertices to allow the water to fill and drain.

    Didn't see that one coming. Seems like a pretty ingenious way to get the advantage of a skeg and without the dead weight of a solid piece of wood.

    Well gentlemen, thank you for your thoughts. I think I'll take Breakaway's advice and put the skeg on and if it turns out to be a pain take it off. Just pull off the two pieces of 1/4" and it will leave a little 1-1/2" square external keel on the bottom. Then my problem will be figuring out some kind of kick-up rudder.
    Last edited by graystork44; 09-08-2018 at 11:26 AM.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    Well, I certainly understand that my waters are different from those of Florida. So are the waters of New Jersey, where Graystork will be using the boat. My experience going into silty inlets like Jud Creek out on Vashon is that the boat sails right up onto the beach. Most sharpies without a skeg have a balanced rudder unprotected by a skeg, and don't actually draw less water. I suppose you could put a kick-up rudder on one, but it would help if the boat was designed for it, and would therefore balance properly. Just taking the skeg off an existing design risks adding a lot of weather helm, which could hurt the boat's performance and make it harder to control. If you take the skeg off, you have to revisit the entire design.
    I'm not familiar with "most sharpies" but have personal experience with Colvin and Titcome sharpies. Both have balanced rudders and small skegs. The bottom of the skegs were parallel to the hull bottom and same draft as the hull...not deeper. The rudders were protected by the skegs and draft about 15" on 32'.

    On the OPs boat I would probably reduce the skeg draft and not worry much about "revisiting the entire design". This isn't a racing boat or even a high performance hull. It was designed as a work boat and I would guess the deep skeg more for working (hands off) directional stability and less for supreme sailing performance. Years back I took a one off 16' hull to a well known architect to dial in a sail rig. He did the numbers and they were within nano inches of my estimated cb and rig locations. He also told me small boats were so sensitive to loading trim, wave action etc that dialing in a rig was more a best guess than specific. I tend to agree.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Skeg. Skeg. Skeg.

    Just don't make it deeper than the lowest point of the hull. Draw it straight across from there. You don't want it to snag a rock.

    Tracking ability is better than instant tacking.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Skeg. Skeg. Skeg.

    Just don't make it deeper than the lowest point of the hull. Draw it straight across from there. You don't want it to snag a rock.

    Tracking ability is better than instant tacking.

    Agreed. If the skeg just ran flat from the bottom I would've been fine with it. The way it digs down aft is what freaked me out in the first place. Yet this appears to be common in the small sharpie skiffs. Both the 18' oystering skiff and the 18' Modified (V-bottom) Chesapeake Bay Skiff in ASSC have it.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    you are probaly obsessing over something that hardly matters.. On the other hand why complicate sailing with a cat ketch rig? One mast 2 sails are certainly lighter in weight than 2 and 4
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    you are probaly obsessing over something that hardly matters.. On the other hand why complicate sailing with a cat ketch rig? One mast 2 sails are certainly lighter in weight than 2 and 4

    Always been a dream of mine Denise. Actually will be 2 sails 2 masts since the cat-ketch doesn't use a jib or staysails. Lower center of effort with the two sails and the main sheet will give my granddaughter something to do while I'm tending the helm and the mizzen sheet. I've always been in love with that rig ever since reading Reuel Parker. Those cat-ketch sharpies have always just struck a chord with me. And Michalak's boat appears to be the most cost effective way for me to get one in a size that I can justify. Mystic Seaport's 15' WB would be perfect, but its traditional construction probably wouldn't work well on a trailer-boat which mine will be.

    I'd love to build Parker's 19' Ohio Sharpie but don't know if my boatbuilding skills rise to that level. I've got a lot more confidence in Michalak's Bolger-esque designs and instructions.

    PS. Good luck with the Ducker. Love the historical local boats. If I ever get my cat-ketch my next dream is a tuckup.
    Last edited by graystork44; 09-08-2018 at 02:30 PM.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    I'm not familiar with "most sharpies" but have personal experience with Colvin and Titcome sharpies. Both have balanced rudders and small skegs. The bottom of the skegs were parallel to the hull bottom and same draft as the hull...not deeper. The rudders were protected by the skegs and draft about 15" on 32'.

    On the OPs boat I would probably reduce the skeg draft and not worry much about "revisiting the entire design". This isn't a racing boat or even a high performance hull. It was designed as a work boat and I would guess the deep skeg more for working (hands off) directional stability and less for supreme sailing performance. Years back I took a one off 16' hull to a well known architect to dial in a sail rig. He did the numbers and they were within nano inches of my estimated cb and rig locations. He also told me small boats were so sensitive to loading trim, wave action etc that dialing in a rig was more a best guess than specific. I tend to agree.
    I've got a lot of years in sailing an Egret replica and a New Haven sharpie.

    https://www.scribd.com/document/2007...oy-of-Sharpies



    My statement about most sharpies was based on the writings of Chapell, Sucher and Parker. The sharpie I designed and built for myself had a modern daggerboard and rudder, totally unsuited to Florida but not bad around here.

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/21456843/...pie-Black-Swan

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    Quote Originally Posted by graystork44 View Post
    Always been a dream of mine Denise. Actually will be 2 sails 2 masts since the cat-ketch doesn't use a jib or staysails. Lower center of effort with the two sails and the main sheet will give my granddaughter something to do while I'm tending the helm and the mizzen sheet. I've always been in love with that rig ever since reading Reuel Parker. Those cat-ketch sharpies have always just struck a chord with me. And Michalak's boat appears to be the most cost effective way for me to get one in a size that I can justify. Mystic Seaport's 15' WB would be perfect, but its traditional construction probably wouldn't work well on a trailer-boat which mine will be.

    I'd love to build Parker's 19' Ohio Sharpie but don't know if my boatbuilding skills rise to that level. I've got a lot more confidence in Michalak's Bolger-esque designs and instructions.

    PS. Good luck with the Ducker. Love the historical local boats. If I ever get my cat-ketch my next dream is a tuckup.
    Thanks!
    Every now and then I see a Meadowlark on Craigslist, that I think was up on Nockamixon they were trying to sell it for next to nothing, I think it had a broken mast andwas a cat catch rig.

    I once wanted to build a 27-foot New Haven Sharpie but we'd have a bit of little getting in and out my basement.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Lol it's still on sailboat listings and may not be the same one.
    https://m.sailboatlistings.com/view/58906
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Yes. Its rigging was quite primitive, but perhaps historically accurate. It had wood fair leads where we would use blocks with sheaves. The sails needed a base ball bat to pound out the creases. The sail cloth was too heavy. They must have had some canvas left over from the "Charles W. Morgan".

    But she did sail and quite well too. I wanted to sail her because I was planning to build a sharpie and I had never sailed one. I am now almost finished with Parker's Ohio Sharpie.

    My wife and I must have looked like professionals. The Mystic Seaport person running the livery took videos of us.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    I am interested in this issue of skeg, or no skeg. Rauel Parker's Ohio Sharpie has a rectangular wood center board that swings down about 30 degrees. He suggests 200 pounds or more of sheet lead in the bottom.

    I have "improved" his design (We shall see about that.), by redesigning the CB so that it can swing down about 60 degrees and be made of steel. The advantages are that it will have about twice as much area below the bottom, and the center of gravity will be about eight inches below the bottom. The CB will make some contribution to the righting moment.

    The issue that concerns me is that the center of area of the CB will be about one foot further forward. Will this cause a prohibitive weather helm? Would a rudder skeg correct that? The current design has none.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by ahp View Post
    Yes. Its rigging was quite primitive, but perhaps historically accurate. It had wood fair leads where we would use blocks with sheaves. The sails needed a base ball bat to pound out the creases. The sail cloth was too heavy. They must have had some canvas left over from the "Charles W. Morgan".

    But she did sail and quite well too. I wanted to sail her because I was planning to build a sharpie and I had never sailed one. I am now almost finished with Parker's Ohio Sharpie.

    My wife and I must have looked like professionals. The Mystic Seaport person running the livery took videos of us.
    Would love to hear your experiences with building the Ohio Sharpie. Have you posted a building log anywhere?

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by ahp View Post
    I am interested in this issue of skeg, or no skeg. Rauel Parker's Ohio Sharpie has a rectangular wood center board that swings down about 30 degrees. He suggests 200 pounds or more of sheet lead in the bottom.

    I have "improved" his design (We shall see about that.), by redesigning the CB so that it can swing down about 60 degrees and be made of steel. The advantages are that it will have about twice as much area below the bottom, and the center of gravity will be about eight inches below the bottom. The CB will make some contribution to the righting moment.

    The issue that concerns me is that the center of area of the CB will be about one foot further forward. Will this cause a prohibitive weather helm? Would a rudder skeg correct that? The current design has none.
    The technique for finding C. L. E is simple enough, just balance a cut out of her profile on the edge of a ruler or knife. Do it as designed, and with the new steel cb, you will need to add the skeg, but the trial will tell you how much deeper you can lower the new cb than the old and keep the C L E in the same place.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by graystork44 View Post
    Mystic Seaport's 15' WB would be perfect, but its traditional construction probably wouldn't work well on a trailer-boat which mine will be.
    .
    I have the plans for the WB and although I'm not expert on such things, I can't see any reason that it couldn't be built with plywood instead of "real" wood and I have often contemplated doing just that. There are no significant twists to the side planking and it doesn't look like they would be a problem. The bottom is dead flat across the beam and that definitely won't be a problem except maybe for the fore and aft bend. Depending on how thick the plywood is, you might have to do it in two layers. Still it would be worth building a scale model of the hull to make sure that the sheet goods will work.

    Of course, there's still the issue of the rudder

    Anyway, it's a thought...
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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianY View Post
    I have the plans for the WB and although I'm not expert on such things, I can't see any reason that it couldn't be built with plywood instead of "real" wood and I have often contemplated doing just that. There are no significant twists to the side planking and it doesn't look like they would be a problem. The bottom is dead flat across the beam and that definitely won't be a problem except maybe for the fore and aft bend. Depending on how thick the plywood is, you might have to do it in two layers. Still it would be worth building a scale model of the hull to make sure that the sheet goods will work.

    Of course, there's still the issue of the rudder

    Anyway, it's a thought...

    Had the same thought and actually started to rough it out once on the plans. I figured 1/2" bottom with 1/4" sides and decks. The problem I ran into was that the stations on the plans weren't where I'd like to put the bulkheads, namely the front and back of the centerboard case. In fact I don't remember seeing any bulkheads at all, just thwarts. Here's a picture from the front of the centerboard case to the stem. At that point I thought it got too complicated for just my second boat. Please build this, I'd love to see it.

    Attachment 22497

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    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Why would you not build in plywood? and the skeg.. leave it off, easy to add when you need it. I don't see the skeg giving anyone problems unless they want to sail on mud
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    2,985

    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Why would you not build in plywood? and the skeg.. leave it off, easy to add when you need it. I don't see the skeg giving anyone problems unless they want to sail on mud I Guess a retractable skeg is easy nuff to devise .. like a little center board.

    Don't understand why the stations not being bulkheads is an issue either.

    Have you read this thread? http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?186995-Sharpie-limitations


    Last edited by DeniseO30; 09-09-2018 at 12:10 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Brisbane QDL (Everton Park)
    Posts
    557

    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    The long skeg/keel makes a sand/mud ski to help you power over the shallow bumps. It also makes trailering easier. The long straight keel sits on a narrow ladder of rollers. It adds strength to the hull and protects the rudder. 'Makes tacking slower but gives better directional stability. My 18' Reuel Parker Crab Skiff draws 15".
    =~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~

    When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.

    Mark Twain

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Voorhees, NJ
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Skeg or no skeg on an 18' sharpie

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Why would you not build in plywood? and the skeg.. leave it off, easy to add when you need it. I don't see the skeg giving anyone problems unless they want to sail on mud I Guess a retractable skeg is easy nuff to devise .. like a little center board.

    Don't understand why the stations not being bulkheads is an issue either.

    Have you read this thread? http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?186995-Sharpie-limitations


    Ok I read the thread. So there are people who don't like sharpies and people who do like sharpies. I'm one that appreciates the elegance of a solution that works as simply as possible. My needs are a trailer-launched day sailer that will probably never see anything other than the small freshwater lakes of New Jersey. I am a coward, fair-weather sailor on the water and at the first sign of bad weather head for shore. I do not need tremendous reserve stability, in fact just to get my wife into the boat I need substantial initial stability because she is scared by "tippy" boats. If the water is choppy enough to cause the dreaded sharpie pounding, I'm most likely ashore. I have never singled-handed a boat with any type of stay, vang, or fixed rigging and don't have the slightest idea of how to set it up, maintain it or adjust it. And quite frankly, because whippy non-stayed sharpie poles have always done what I wanted, I don't feel like learning about or paying for standing rigging. Stepping up to round masts is a jump for me because my last one was square and made from a 14' fir 2x4. In fact I just might make do with octagonal ones. Do I appreciate the beauty of a Seabright skiff or melonseed? Absolutely. Do I need the advantages these beautifully shaped hulls provide? No. I like the sharpie form not because it's the best, but because for an extremely simple design I'm amazed at how well it works. I'm building a new boat for two reasons 1. the 14' Bolger June Bug is too small for two people who are larger than female Olympic gymnasts and 2. I'd like the challenge of handling more than one sail, without the bother of standing rigging. The simplest way I can solve this problem will be the one I take. Which right now looks like the Michalak/Chapelle 18' Oyster Skiff rerigged with the cat-ketch rig of a Core Sound 17. And if that makes me a nautical Philistine, guilty as charged.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    2,985

    Default

    Have you considered Tabernacle mast/s?

    Have you considered Cat Boats? Very wide beam very shallow draft not much standing rigging, the larger ones can even be done in cat Ketch rig.

    Don't feel put upon, no one's trying to sway you, that's just the way these discussions go, it's called thread drift.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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