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Thread: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

  1. #71
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    That's a neat idea to create a lap where the sheets join. I was going to radius the edges where they meet so i had a decent gap to fill, and trowel in thickened epoxy. I figured sanding back at that will give me a flat surface to glass over.
    Clearly all joins to land on beams. I'll be screwing down with 4omm SS square drive screws, predrilled. (I really don't like slotted screws anymore! Took me 40mins to extract 5 of them on Sunday)
    Will get some bamboo skewers to fill existing screw holes, epoxied in.

    Andrew at Denman Marine recommends the Bruynzeel 15mm ply as well. So that's decided, which is nice. Just got to find a local supplier now.

    Thanks Boattruck, all aligning with my thinking.
    I don't work her hard. She's under canvased by a good margin and i am always reluctant to drive her rail in.
    Some heavy seas off the Jervis Bay heads can be bad, especially approaching the 'Sir John Young' banks off Beecroft head, with a southerly change on an easterly swell, picking up the (northerly) east Australian Current (Nemo - yes its real ) and the huge reflection off the cliffs. That's what being in a washing machine is like!

    Tufnol, it's like a gasket material for engines. Something to bite down hard on and can absorb the working.
    Thanks for the tip on radiusing the bolt holes.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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  2. #72
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Interesting thread. Nothing to add, but I'll be in the background to form part of the glass over ply cheer squad. Simple, strong, dimensionally stable, and I reckon better looking, what more could you want.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Got stuck into a few more jobs.

    Got the rudder head off very easily with a puller I borrowed. I'd sprayed it with Inox last week and it seems to have penetrated down the shaft.

    Started forward on the ply deck.
    It seems to be a very large piece of ply. The foredeck seems to be about 2.2m wide and probably 2m deep. I haven't measured it.
    The deck/hull edge is screwed together through the sheer strake by 50mm slotted screws about every 10cm. Took the morning to pull them up.

    IMG_5134.jpg

    Tried to prise the whole sheet but no go.
    So i set the depth on the small circular saw to within a whisker of penetrating and scribed a kerf athwartships between the beams.

    IMG_5151.jpg

    It appears to be glued on too, but i don't know by what means. Its not thick like epoxy.
    Across the beams its nailed on. The beams seem to have some kind of black substance laid on. I think they've been sealed by some kind of CPES maybe (though not sure what date that became available) and then perhaps a very thin coat of tar......?
    On the port side its tearing out the edge of the sheer strake where it runs out. Bit of carpentry to repair there unfortunately.
    I think i'll modify my method so i cut inside the sheer strake and chisel the deck piece off the top. Slower removing but likely to have far less repair work to be done.

    Here's the bow, right behind the bow rollers.
    The ply goes under the steel fitting, so it'll have to come off.

    IMG_5149.jpg
    Last edited by gypsie; 09-25-2018 at 12:35 AM.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    strange - the thread decided to double one of my posts......
    Last edited by gypsie; 09-25-2018 at 12:38 AM.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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  5. #75
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Brother in law came out to help which was nice.

    IMG_5135.jpg

    a longer shot of the bow.

    IMG_5152.jpg

    Here's some more of the deck disappearing.

    IMG_5153.jpg

    And a bit more.....

    IMG_5156.jpg

    Thats where we left it for that day.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Made myself a couple of butch trestles from 50mm x 200mm planks.

    IMG_5161.jpg

    Gave me easy access to the bow to tackle this beatch.

    IMG_5162.jpg

    I wasn't sure how it was fastened.
    There were two uneven bumps on the foward edge that i suspected hid hex heads that screwed into the two recieving threaded bumps on the top.

    IMG_5163.jpg

    I ground one off and found it was simply the steel rod peened over. Someone went to a lot of trouble.
    The thing about that, i've always thought, is you peen the far side - in other words, you push through from side A and peen side B. This seems to have been pushed through from side A and peened there. Which begged the question about the apparant threaded bit on deck.....
    So i did what anyone in my situation would do - i belted it with a hammer.

    IMG_5164.jpg

    And with some persuasion it began to move. the rod was not threaded at the deck side. Just pushed through and covered in some kind of silicone sealer or something.
    I was having a bit of a time punching it out with my little ball peen hammer - having smashed my heavy mallet on an earlier piece of bashing. Thankfully a guy in the yard spotted my predicament and offered a solution - and was keen to take part. To he went at the two riods and bashed them out.
    I pointed out the Turpentine Stem, 'Turpentine what!?". Stem, i said.
    He made me aware that he knows nothing about boats, but he does know about wood and that my stem was far too hard for turpentine - it was in his opinion, judging by Janka scale and colour, Iron Bark or spotted gum - probably Iron Bark.

    here it is laid bare.

    IMG_5165.jpg

    You can see the holes where the rods punched through.
    The wood is a dark red/purple, so the impression is of very dark wood - which is right. But No rot on the stem at all. solid as.
    The same can't be said for the planking under that steel fitting though. The sheer strake where it was covered is rotten. Seems isolated to just inside that fitting, small triangle of rot.
    Its amazing that all the rot form the decks doesn't seem to have infected the sheer strake or the beams in any way. RELIEF!
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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  7. #77
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Shot of the rotten end of the plank -where it fastens to the stem.

    Attachment 23423

    There's a frame 6" abaft the stem, so i'm thinking i can simply fill that triangle with good timber, CPES'd and then epoxied into place, without having to scarf back into the plank....... That the deck screwed to the plank along its edge, and extedning under that bow roller, screwed to the stem, will look after it structurally.

    Whatta ya think?
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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  8. #78
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    Default

    My decks at some stage had creosote injected into them or were bedded in creosote or something. Maybe the same on yours? Kind of thick and tarry now when it makes itself visible.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #79
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Your deck to beam adhesive looks like resorcinol to me.

    I'm not sure what turpentine your friend is used to but the turpentine I'm making all my skirting and architraves with is a hell of a lot harder than the spotted gum I built the staircase and balustrade from. Turpentine is really hard.

    I don't really understand your last question but I'll have a look later on a computer and see if I can work it out.

    Rick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    My decks at some stage had creosote injected into them or were bedded in creosote or something. Maybe the same on yours? Kind of thick and tarry now when it makes itself visible.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    Yeah, you may be right. It’s pretty black though. At first I thought it was rot, it has the same look. But it scrapes off.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    Your deck to beam adhesive looks like resorcinol to me.

    I'm not sure what turpentine your friend is used to but the turpentine I'm making all my skirting and architraves with is a hell of a lot harder than the spotted gum I built the staircase and balustrade from. Turpentine is really hard.

    I don't really understand your last question but I'll have a look later on a computer and see if I can work it out.

    Rick


    I am inclined toward Turpentine too.
    I do not like to tell a man his business, but all information i have on the boat has been 100 percent accurate to date. I found quite a bit in old news paper clippings and such to corroborate, so I think I can rely on what I have been told.

    Also turpentine makes perfect sense. I have not heard it being used as keel timber before, but you got to think ‘of course’! Though if my sample is anything to go by, there is a good reason it is not used in planking.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  12. #82
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    Default 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    I will get to the boat this weekend and clean up the bow timbers to have a better look.
    Clearer pictures may help.

    Just wondering about the sheer strake not having a fastener into the stem. Is there enough structure around it to support it.

    Having said that, the section at the stem was so soft it was doing nothing structural and it had been like that for a good while I would hazard.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    In prodded a bit of my deck today, around a known leak which has got quite a bit worse lately. Let's just say I dont think you'd want to step on it! I think fairly soon I'll be replacing a bit of side deck, maybe 7 or so metres by 40 cm. I'm not up for doing the whole deck in one go, and this is probably going to be the biggest single section I have to deal with. Bring on summer.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Slight worry, it feels like the cockpit coaming, outboard sides, at the deck join, is soft. Pulling out the cockpit would be annoying.

    I have always intended to pull up the cockpit seats, the drain away is rubbish. But to pull out the coaming is to truely mess with the structure.

    But, what needs to be done, needs to be done.
    Ultimately you will find a lot more damage than you first anticipated and will be required to remove all of it in order to have a solid repair.

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Shot of the rotten end of the plank -where it fastens to the stem.

    Attachment 23423

    There's a frame 6" abaft the stem, so i'm thinking i can simply fill that triangle with good timber, CPES'd and then epoxied into place, without having to scarf back into the plank....... That the deck screwed to the plank along its edge, and extedning under that bow roller, screwed to the stem, will look after it structurally.

    Whatta ya think?
    I can't see the picture and I can't work out what you mean to do - sorry!

    Turpentine would be murder to try and plank a boat with, I think. Although they planked boats with jarrah and it's pretty hard! Turpentine will rot - not easily but you do see rotten turpentine in old jetties etc.

    Rick

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Ultimately you will find a lot more damage than you first anticipated and will be required to remove all of it in order to have a solid repair.
    I have to agree. I understand the dilemma though. But, it's deceptive. The cockpit is really only a big hole in the deck and once you start removing some of this more substantial stuff, it becomes more straightforward and you can arrange better repair and replacement. Workarounds are typically more difficult.

    Rick

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    I must admit that I truly feel for you and your project as I know how much time, effort and expensive material this kind of a job takes!

    If you choose to use turps, be sure that it is "Pure Gum Spirits of Turpentine" and not that useless synthetic stuff they are pawning off on the unsuspecting public nowdays!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 09-25-2018 at 12:37 PM.

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    I can see how planking a boat with fake mineral spirits would be really tricky. Jay, Turpentine is a type of hardwood over here. As well as paint thinner in a bottle.

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I must admit that I truly feel for you and your project as I know how much time, effort and expensive material this kind of a job takes!

    If you choose to use turps, be sure that it is "Pure Gum Spirits of Turpentine" and not that useless synthetic stuff they are pawning off on the unsuspecting public nowdays!
    Jay
    Hey Jay, you may misunderstand; Turpentine the timber. It's used extensively here for jetties and wharves. It is very rot resistant and almost completely borer resistant. And hard as rock. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syncarpia_glomulifera
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Ultimately you will find a lot more damage than you first anticipated and will be required to remove all of it in order to have a solid repair.
    I may have dodged a bullet.
    As i pulled up the teak it seems the softness is restricted to the seam/join where the teak met the coaming. A broken line parallel to the deck about 3 or 5mm wide, and only one ply deep. I think i can sand it out, fill and paint over.
    Under that is still solid everywhere i have looked, with one small exception.

    Has anyone heard of using engine coolant as an anti-fungal treatment?
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    You can't kill rot in timber by applying any chemical to its surface. You really do need to cut it all right out or it will continue. The fungus extends a long way beyond any softness in the timber. So make sure you cut deeply - deeper than you think you should, generally.

    There are chemicals that will help timber resist future (as opposed to current) rot. I'd prefer to use one that's been developed by one of the known paint/chemical companies for that specific purpose than something someone's grandfather heard about from a neighbour while he was visiting from Sweden …

    Rick

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    I must admit that I was a bit at a loss when I read the mention of "Turpentine" being used on your boat. I was of the impression that you were using turps. to soak into the wood which could be a local custom. Here we steam distill longleaf yellow pine, mainly, to obtain turps. Yellow pine is a great wood for floor timbers incidentally. Different ships, different long splices!
    Jay

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    You can't kill rot in timber by applying any chemical to its surface. You really do need to cut it all right out or it will continue. The fungus extends a long way beyond any softness in the timber. So make sure you cut deeply - deeper than you think you should, generally.

    There are chemicals that will help timber resist future (as opposed to current) rot. I'd prefer to use one that's been developed by one of the known paint/chemical companies for that specific purpose than something someone's grandfather heard about from a neighbour while he was visiting from Sweden …

    Rick
    Rick, I'm happy to hear that! I've been using Xylophene, a product sold - well, at least in France and Portugal - to kill whatever might be inside the wood to prevent further spreading, and to prevent any new stuff from happening. I have applied it to stuff still more or less alive and could watch it dying, so I'm pretty sure it works. It has it's health-issues, and one should only apply it with gloves and a mask with up to date filter. According to the instructions once it's inside the wood and the rest evaporated there would be no more risk for people. Alright. In the meantime people told me to use Borax or Antifreeze instead, it is doing the same thing, and wood treated thus can't be affected any more. I've got a collection of links which give proof for it. I know we're getting sold loads of stuff for big money where the same can be achieved with simple remedies people have used for ages, and which don't cost an arm and a leg. Borax and Antifreeze, what I've read about it, are convincing. But does it really work? Whom can I contact if my Epoxy doesn't like it for example after all the job is done? It stays inside the timber and keeps dissolving the moment it gets in contact with humidity/water again. What if things go wrong many years later? Xylophene apparently kills what is there, leaves some chemicals inside the timber which turn and stay solid and in place. The moment the solvent has disappeared things will remain stable and - hopefully - not affect anything. I've managed to get hold of 3 KG of Borax powder, and I bought a bottle of antifreeze. Still got some Xylophene left and everything inside me is shouting: get yourself a spare tin of Xylophene immediately!

    And sure, I can't agree more, once the timber is affected, it's got to come out! Still, before cutting it out I applied Xylophene on the affected bits too, hoping that tiny bits falling on non-affected wood-surfaces won't spread it anywhere else.
    Last edited by Dody; 09-26-2018 at 04:17 PM.
    fair winds, Dody

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Great looking boat, and good to see your progress.

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Yes I've heard of anti freeze being used as a rot killer/stopper. Ethylene glycol I think. Can't say whether it works though. Rick is right, and as I said earlier, cut deep and far, well beyond the damaged wood. Generally it's no more difficult to replace a square foot of deck than 3 square inches. But I will have the same issue as you, what to do where my damaged ply is close to, or extends under, cabin sides and cockpit coamings. The right answer is cut, cut, cut. On the day, I might be satisfied that without constant damp, any remaining rot spores will die anyway, and do no more harm. I do worry about spreading rot spores throughout the boat while doing the work. Still, one can worry too much I suppose, what's the alternative?

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    The truth of the matter with rot is that you should try to use wood that resists it as well as forms of construction that reduce the chance of having standing or stagnating water in the boat for long periods of time. With today's material costs going through the roof and lack of old growth timber, it is really a challenge to come up with an economical means of subduing the "Rot Monsters"!

    Beware of too much or too strong a mixture of Borax as it can attack wood fibers as well as eat up fastenings!
    Jay

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Thanks Dody, I have some literature on using Ethylene Glycol to prevent and attack rot. It's hydro-tropic (it is attracted to moisture) and seems to lay dormant, waiting like a sentry, until moisture is created. Then it attacks and kills the spores and goes back to sleep.
    I'll scan the document i have and post it.
    I take your point though, "will it affect gluing.....?"

    I think i'll epoxy the deck/hull edge and screw down with SS 40mm screws (30mm into the sheer strake) every 100mm. Epoxy is as much for sealing the join and preventing water ingress as for fastening. I do trust epoxy to hold tight, but it only holds the surface, so penetrating deeper into the plank with a fastener feels right. I don't think i'll glue across the beams, I can't see the point (happy to be enlightened) - but again 40mm SS screws about 200mm apart and staggered to left and right of the beam. Maybe here, in the beams, is a good place to apply some antifreeze - nothing to lose.

    I will seal the top of the sheerstrake with CPES, and the entire deck pieces will all be coated on all surfaces with CPES. Painted underneath and epoxy/glass/paint on top.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Spotted this in wikipedia;

    Ethylene glycol has seen some use as a rot and fungal treatment for wood, both as a preventative and a treatment after the fact. It has been used in a few cases to treat partially rotted wooden objects to be displayed in museums. It is one of only a few treatments that are successful in dealing with rot in wooden boats, and is relatively cheap.
    Interesting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethylene_glycol
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Got a quote for dry ice rig hire - AU$2,000 for the rig and estimated material. But the guy predicts a further AU$1,000 in costs. It needs a heavy pickup or truck to pull the compressor. He estimates 7 to 10 hours of work so the compressor would be a two day hire. The blast system is a 1 week hire so no rush there.
    No PPE with the system, but it doesn't need anything like the full cover suit a grit blast would need it seems - just gloves, goggles and ears. Which i think is odd, i've used dry ice in theaters and it is dangerous stuff to touch anywhere on your body.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    What are you using the dry ice blaster for gypsy?

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    The truth of the matter with rot is that you should try to use wood that resists it as well as forms of construction that reduce the chance of having standing or stagnating water in the boat for long periods of time. With today's material costs going through the roof and lack of old growth timber, it is really a challenge to come up with an economical means of subduing the "Rot Monsters"!

    Beware of too much or too strong a mixture of Borax as it can attack wood fibers as well as eat up fastenings!
    Jay
    I don't use any wood preservatives. I use timber that doesn't really rot wherever possible. For decks etc., I use plywood properly sheathed. I make sure that the construction method cannot trap water anywhere and that every part of the interior is well ventilated. I keep the bilge dry so there's no buildup of condensation. I never use CPES, Everdure or any of that stuff EXCEPT for the underside and edges of ply (I use epoxy resin thinned with TPRD but I'm sure CPES etc. would be fine for that).

    On various occasions, I've contacted paint companies to ask about product performance etc. I've always found them knowledgeable, helpful and down-to-earth. I'd recommend talking to at least one of them (they are chemists, after all) before saturating the boat with any goop.


    I'll be very interested to see how the ice blasting goes as I have a whole Folkboat to strip.


    Rick

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
    Posts
    582

    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Thanks Dody, I have some literature on using Ethylene Glycol to prevent and attack rot. It's hydro-tropic (it is attracted to moisture) and seems to lay dormant, waiting like a sentry, until moisture is created. Then it attacks and kills the spores and goes back to sleep.
    I'll scan the document i have and post it.
    I take your point though, "will it affect gluing.....?"

    I think i'll epoxy the deck/hull edge and screw down with SS 40mm screws (30mm into the sheer strake) every 100mm. Epoxy is as much for sealing the join and preventing water ingress as for fastening. I do trust epoxy to hold tight, but it only holds the surface, so penetrating deeper into the plank with a fastener feels right. I don't think i'll glue across the beams, I can't see the point (happy to be enlightened) - but again 40mm SS screws about 200mm apart and staggered to left and right of the beam. Maybe here, in the beams, is a good place to apply some antifreeze - nothing to lose.

    I will seal the top of the sheerstrake with CPES, and the entire deck pieces will all be coated on all surfaces with CPES. Painted underneath and epoxy/glass/paint on top.
    Not sure if you're doing yourself a big favour in using epoxy for the hull/deck joint. Your boat is not plastic, it's timber. There is a lot of stuff going on in this joint when your boat is out at sea. On top of that your planks of the hull react different to movement and humidity than your plywood on the deck. A bedding-compound that stays flexible might be a better choice. I'm using Sikaflex 291i for this joint on Tonga. No idea if this is right, but this is what I came up with for me after reading and reading and reading.

    Concerning your deckbeams. My favourite expert is (was, RIP George!) George Buehler ("Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding"). He and others hammered into me never to join any timber without using some kind of bedding-compound (and never forget to paint the end-grain of timber). So here again, I used Sikaflex 291i where the ply of the deck is laying on the deckbeams. And I'm using SS screws less than 10 cm apart on the deckbeams and the beamshelf, 6 x 60, so they just don't show on the underside but have the maximum length.

    EDIT: Don't get confused please, with me using the term beamshelf. In American English and British English the term has a different meaning. To make this all the more confusing Tonga is built in a different manner than your ship or many others. There is a timber 6.5 cm wide and 4 cm high running all the length of my ship bolted to the planks with a batten on top, the deckbeams resting against this "beamshelf" and held in place with nails from the planks, a construction underneath which is bolted to the frames, and the deck itself is resting on this shelf.
    Last edited by Dody; 09-27-2018 at 08:11 PM.
    fair winds, Dody

    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...h-Tonga/page12

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    2,302

    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Thanks Dody,
    I understood your reference to the beam shelf. Mine doesn't have a shelf - just a sheer clamp on which the beams rest.
    I have considered using sikaflex under the beams - i like that general rule you mentioned about bedding. I'll keep that in mind and will probably follow your lead.

    I was thinking the same about the deck/hull join. My thinking is; i'm keen to bring the fiberglass cloth down around the edges of the deck and cover the first 2.5cm of the sheer strake. If the hull and sheer are not firmly held together, this will quickly open up and I'm back to square one. Looking at how it was fastened up to now, the sheer edge was definitely glued to the ply deck. And a screw every 100mm is a lot of fasteners; i'm not sure there was much 'working' between them.

    Then there is my every present thought about epoxy, which has nothing to do with 'work' but everything to do with atmosphere - epoxy ply deck is stable, non-epoxy wooden hull is not. Stable next to non-stable = breaking apart. So maybe you are on the money and i don't bring the fiberglass down the side.

    I'm keeping an open mind about it and appreciate your input. Thanks

    T
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    2,302

    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Geftb View Post
    What are you using the dry ice blaster for gypsy?
    My anti-foul is so built up its coming off in chunks down to the wood. I need to take some or all of it off.
    Just riffing on options.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Melb, Vic, Aus
    Posts
    245

    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    The reason I asked, I called a ice blaster guy yesterday to look into ice blasting my whole boat for a re paint. He seemed to think it wouldn't touch the existing paint. Only loose flaking stuff.

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