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Thread: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

  1. #71
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    That's a neat idea to create a lap where the sheets join. I was going to radius the edges where they meet so i had a decent gap to fill, and trowel in thickened epoxy. I figured sanding back at that will give me a flat surface to glass over.
    Clearly all joins to land on beams. I'll be screwing down with 4omm SS square drive screws, predrilled. (I really don't like slotted screws anymore! Took me 40mins to extract 5 of them on Sunday)
    Will get some bamboo skewers to fill existing screw holes, epoxied in.

    Andrew at Denman Marine recommends the Bruynzeel 15mm ply as well. So that's decided, which is nice. Just got to find a local supplier now.

    Thanks Boattruck, all aligning with my thinking.
    I don't work her hard. She's under canvased by a good margin and i am always reluctant to drive her rail in.
    Some heavy seas off the Jervis Bay heads can be bad, especially approaching the 'Sir John Young' banks off Beecroft head, with a southerly change on an easterly swell, picking up the (northerly) east Australian Current (Nemo - yes its real ) and the huge reflection off the cliffs. That's what being in a washing machine is like!

    Tufnol, it's like a gasket material for engines. Something to bite down hard on and can absorb the working.
    Thanks for the tip on radiusing the bolt holes.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Interesting thread. Nothing to add, but I'll be in the background to form part of the glass over ply cheer squad. Simple, strong, dimensionally stable, and I reckon better looking, what more could you want.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Got stuck into a few more jobs.

    Got the rudder head off very easily with a puller I borrowed. I'd sprayed it with Inox last week and it seems to have penetrated down the shaft.

    Started forward on the ply deck.
    It seems to be a very large piece of ply. The foredeck seems to be about 2.2m wide and probably 2m deep. I haven't measured it.
    The deck/hull edge is screwed together through the sheer strake by 50mm slotted screws about every 10cm. Took the morning to pull them up.

    IMG_5134.jpg

    Tried to prise the whole sheet but no go.
    So i set the depth on the small circular saw to within a whisker of penetrating and scribed a kerf athwartships between the beams.

    IMG_5151.jpg

    It appears to be glued on too, but i don't know by what means. Its not thick like epoxy.
    Across the beams its nailed on. The beams seem to have some kind of black substance laid on. I think they've been sealed by some kind of CPES maybe (though not sure what date that became available) and then perhaps a very thin coat of tar......?
    On the port side its tearing out the edge of the sheer strake where it runs out. Bit of carpentry to repair there unfortunately.
    I think i'll modify my method so i cut inside the sheer strake and chisel the deck piece off the top. Slower removing but likely to have far less repair work to be done.

    Here's the bow, right behind the bow rollers.
    The ply goes under the steel fitting, so it'll have to come off.

    IMG_5149.jpg
    Last edited by gypsie; 09-25-2018 at 12:35 AM.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    strange - the thread decided to double one of my posts......
    Last edited by gypsie; 09-25-2018 at 12:38 AM.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Brother in law came out to help which was nice.

    IMG_5135.jpg

    a longer shot of the bow.

    IMG_5152.jpg

    Here's some more of the deck disappearing.

    IMG_5153.jpg

    And a bit more.....

    IMG_5156.jpg

    Thats where we left it for that day.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Made myself a couple of butch trestles from 50mm x 200mm planks.

    IMG_5161.jpg

    Gave me easy access to the bow to tackle this beatch.

    IMG_5162.jpg

    I wasn't sure how it was fastened.
    There were two uneven bumps on the foward edge that i suspected hid hex heads that screwed into the two recieving threaded bumps on the top.

    IMG_5163.jpg

    I ground one off and found it was simply the steel rod peened over. Someone went to a lot of trouble.
    The thing about that, i've always thought, is you peen the far side - in other words, you push through from side A and peen side B. This seems to have been pushed through from side A and peened there. Which begged the question about the apparant threaded bit on deck.....
    So i did what anyone in my situation would do - i belted it with a hammer.

    IMG_5164.jpg

    And with some persuasion it began to move. the rod was not threaded at the deck side. Just pushed through and covered in some kind of silicone sealer or something.
    I was having a bit of a time punching it out with my little ball peen hammer - having smashed my heavy mallet on an earlier piece of bashing. Thankfully a guy in the yard spotted my predicament and offered a solution - and was keen to take part. To he went at the two riods and bashed them out.
    I pointed out the Turpentine Stem, 'Turpentine what!?". Stem, i said.
    He made me aware that he knows nothing about boats, but he does know about wood and that my stem was far too hard for turpentine - it was in his opinion, judging by Janka scale and colour, Iron Bark or spotted gum - probably Iron Bark.

    here it is laid bare.

    IMG_5165.jpg

    You can see the holes where the rods punched through.
    The wood is a dark red/purple, so the impression is of very dark wood - which is right. But No rot on the stem at all. solid as.
    The same can't be said for the planking under that steel fitting though. The sheer strake where it was covered is rotten. Seems isolated to just inside that fitting, small triangle of rot.
    Its amazing that all the rot form the decks doesn't seem to have infected the sheer strake or the beams in any way. RELIEF!
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Shot of the rotten end of the plank -where it fastens to the stem.

    Attachment 23423

    There's a frame 6" abaft the stem, so i'm thinking i can simply fill that triangle with good timber, CPES'd and then epoxied into place, without having to scarf back into the plank....... That the deck screwed to the plank along its edge, and extedning under that bow roller, screwed to the stem, will look after it structurally.

    Whatta ya think?
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  8. #78
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    Default

    My decks at some stage had creosote injected into them or were bedded in creosote or something. Maybe the same on yours? Kind of thick and tarry now when it makes itself visible.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #79
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Your deck to beam adhesive looks like resorcinol to me.

    I'm not sure what turpentine your friend is used to but the turpentine I'm making all my skirting and architraves with is a hell of a lot harder than the spotted gum I built the staircase and balustrade from. Turpentine is really hard.

    I don't really understand your last question but I'll have a look later on a computer and see if I can work it out.

    Rick

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    My decks at some stage had creosote injected into them or were bedded in creosote or something. Maybe the same on yours? Kind of thick and tarry now when it makes itself visible.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    Yeah, you may be right. It’s pretty black though. At first I thought it was rot, it has the same look. But it scrapes off.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  11. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    Your deck to beam adhesive looks like resorcinol to me.

    I'm not sure what turpentine your friend is used to but the turpentine I'm making all my skirting and architraves with is a hell of a lot harder than the spotted gum I built the staircase and balustrade from. Turpentine is really hard.

    I don't really understand your last question but I'll have a look later on a computer and see if I can work it out.

    Rick


    I am inclined toward Turpentine too.
    I do not like to tell a man his business, but all information i have on the boat has been 100 percent accurate to date. I found quite a bit in old news paper clippings and such to corroborate, so I think I can rely on what I have been told.

    Also turpentine makes perfect sense. I have not heard it being used as keel timber before, but you got to think ‘of course’! Though if my sample is anything to go by, there is a good reason it is not used in planking.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  12. #82
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    Default 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    I will get to the boat this weekend and clean up the bow timbers to have a better look.
    Clearer pictures may help.

    Just wondering about the sheer strake not having a fastener into the stem. Is there enough structure around it to support it.

    Having said that, the section at the stem was so soft it was doing nothing structural and it had been like that for a good while I would hazard.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    In prodded a bit of my deck today, around a known leak which has got quite a bit worse lately. Let's just say I dont think you'd want to step on it! I think fairly soon I'll be replacing a bit of side deck, maybe 7 or so metres by 40 cm. I'm not up for doing the whole deck in one go, and this is probably going to be the biggest single section I have to deal with. Bring on summer.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Slight worry, it feels like the cockpit coaming, outboard sides, at the deck join, is soft. Pulling out the cockpit would be annoying.

    I have always intended to pull up the cockpit seats, the drain away is rubbish. But to pull out the coaming is to truely mess with the structure.

    But, what needs to be done, needs to be done.
    Ultimately you will find a lot more damage than you first anticipated and will be required to remove all of it in order to have a solid repair.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Shot of the rotten end of the plank -where it fastens to the stem.

    Attachment 23423

    There's a frame 6" abaft the stem, so i'm thinking i can simply fill that triangle with good timber, CPES'd and then epoxied into place, without having to scarf back into the plank....... That the deck screwed to the plank along its edge, and extedning under that bow roller, screwed to the stem, will look after it structurally.

    Whatta ya think?
    I can't see the picture and I can't work out what you mean to do - sorry!

    Turpentine would be murder to try and plank a boat with, I think. Although they planked boats with jarrah and it's pretty hard! Turpentine will rot - not easily but you do see rotten turpentine in old jetties etc.

    Rick

  16. #86
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Ultimately you will find a lot more damage than you first anticipated and will be required to remove all of it in order to have a solid repair.
    I have to agree. I understand the dilemma though. But, it's deceptive. The cockpit is really only a big hole in the deck and once you start removing some of this more substantial stuff, it becomes more straightforward and you can arrange better repair and replacement. Workarounds are typically more difficult.

    Rick

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