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Thread: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

  1. #526
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Saturday morning.

    I had two windows to get out of the creek and back on the mooring in time for my Maritime deadline of Monday morning. Midday Saturday, a 1.2m high tide, which gives me about 500mm under my keel over the creek bar. And a midnight 1.6m tide.

    Rising early saturday I ran the motor for a while to see if the heating was okay - all good.
    We had breakfast and decided we would motor up to Huskisson public wharf and see how we felt at midday for the high tide. If it was good we'd motor out to the public moorings off sharknet beach, just outside the creek.

    For my younger boy the boat means instant noodles.
    He goes to the boat just so he can make himself as many instant noodles as he wants.
    It's funny and lovely, always makes us smile.
    Noodles for breakfast anyone?

    IMG_5914.jpg

    The big storms and heavy rain we've had lately and swept down the creek and moved the sand bar around. this often happens, but i wasn't focused on it,.
    There was a tour boat on the public wharf, a dolphin watch boat and was tring to figure out how i would fit in around it when i hit the bar. Stuck and stuck!

    Luckily maritime were just pulling out and spotted my predicament.
    They couldn't help but called marine rescue who came in and pulled me off. bit of a hairy moment when we were caugfht in the rip of the incoming tide and being pushed sideways into a big hulk of a workboat on a mooring. we got control with a meter or so to spare and drove hard to get away from it. Found the very narrow channel and made out way into deeper water and toward the jetty - which was now empty as the tourists had left.
    Last edited by gypsie; 06-24-2019 at 11:10 PM.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  2. #527
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    One thing about the incoming tide about 3 hours before slack water at the creek is, it comes it at a pretty strong pace.
    As it comes in and follows the creek down it spurs off to the left and forms an eddy at the public wharf. It’s not visible, but believe me you can feel it. What it means is a very bizarre and tricky switch from going upstream, into the flow, as you approach the wharf, to suddenly going swiftly down stream about 5m out.

    I got caught out.
    Moving quickly (sideways) toward the jetty, engine in full reverse and tiller hard over and NO response.
    Bowel moving moment in slow motion as the bow of the boat collected a pylon and bent my pulpit in.
    Side of the boat rode up against the pontoon andleft black scuff marks all down the side.

    I could have wept. Still can weep if truth be told.
    She was looking so pretty and ‘job done’ and now she’s bruised and bent.

    Attachment 39980
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  3. #528
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    We took her out of the creek on the midday tide without hitch and picked up the public mooring.
    Southerly wind hitting 30 knots but otherwise sunny.

    The big south easterly swell was pouring into the bay and swinging around to the south. the Husky moorings were getting a bit of a pounding and so were far too uncomfortable for hanging out or sleeping. So we decided to head for hole in the wall in the south east corner of the bay - really well sheltered from the wind and swell.

    Forecast for Sunday was fr the wind to swing around to the SW through the night.
    My mooring at Callala bay is exposed to southerly swell and wind, so Saturday was about as bad as it can get. Sunday should prove to be sheltered in there - a bit - so i reasoned for that. Forecast was for the wind to ease off during early morning, but rain.

    Nice quiet but cold evening in Hole in the Wall. I cooked mash potatoes, sausages and baked beans for dinner - comfort food and yummy. All went to bed content while i had a few beers and a think/decompression.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  4. #529
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Excellent! In the water, not sinking, and engine working. With the engine heating, I've had some engines show a need to bleed air from the coolant (vs seawater) side, and each has had a different solution: Some have bleed valves to account for the angle of engine install, but you had to know to look for them! Others just needed to warm (hopefully not too much), shut down and top up. Still others were really hard, depending upon hose or pipe routing in that particular installation. I'm thinking your situation is in the second category: it burps the air when warm, but you have to watch for it. In use, all of the ones I encountered worked just fine, once past the initial challenge. Except, one installation error i found in two different boats: the heat exchanger and seawater must flow in opposite directions! If the flow is parallel, heat transfer is something like 40% less effective.
    Hope the rig goes up smoothly, and she settles back in. And, I agree 100%, the boys needed to be there, even though its thrice as hard as just doing it! One never knows what exactly the young ones take aboard, but the have to be there to have the chance!
    Brian

  5. #530
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Sunday we were up early.
    It was pouring down - really pouring.
    The nutshell was half full of water from the overnight rain. I got in and bailed it out. I noticed we hadn't switched the breaker for the electric trolling motor off overnight and the battery had drained. I'd have to pull one of the house batteries out to get us to shore.

    breakfast, slipped the moring and headed directly north.
    I like to hug the coast along by Honeymoon Bay. Its pretty untouched there and i love the sight of it. Also, it is usually sheltered, so after a run across the heads it makes for a welcome calm ride.
    Not so this morning.

    Wind was blowing hard, plenty of white horses. My guess (no instruments anymore) was 20knots. the swell turned the corner on the norther head and pulled across the bay. The SW wind was sending a chop sideways against it and we were being flung all around.
    We brought the dog with us - she was terrified.

    Really ****ty trip across the bay for an hour and a half. wind picked up to 30 as per forecast. streaks on the water and the chop smashing square onto our port beam getting us wet. If the sideways rain wasn't doing it already. Possibly the least enjoyable time i've spent on the water (still despondent about my collision the day before).

    Looked for our mooring but didn't recognize it.
    drove around a bit and decided that the bouy where our mooring should be must be ours. I think someone swapped out our bouy and added another ratty thing.
    (A guy parked a Beneteau next to our mooring for 6 months. My mooring was fouling his prop so he sank my mooring with a breeze block. My neighbour retrieved it while he was inspecting my mooring in advance of my coming home - great guy Peter! Much appreciated.)
    Last edited by gypsie; 06-24-2019 at 11:33 PM.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  6. #531
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Aarrgh! Your more recent posts showed after I posted mine! Sorry for the trials, I was thinking all was well and settled! Well, in some ways, you've already gotten the first dings, so less worry henceforth?

  7. #532
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Picked up the mooring and set about closing up shop.
    The dog, terrified, was so mad to get to shore she jumped overboard!
    We didn't realise. I was below decks and i heard this plop plop plop - and investigated to find her paddling (even more terrified) next to the boat - plop plop plop.
    Son #1 jumped into the dink and pulled her out. She won't do that again.

    Remember - sideways rain, strong winds. The mooring was shelterd somewhat fro the wind and completely from the chop - so it wasn't bad. But we were cold and very wet.
    Gathered our gear and got it into the tender. Pulled out a battery and fitted it to the trolling motor.
    As much as we tried, everything just got wet. The rain was driving in hard.

    I closed up the boat and we made for the car onshore. (I brought the car round the day before and got a lift back from a mate).

    packed up the car and left the tender.
    Drove to my mates house and picked up my trailer - drove back to the mooring and retirved the tender.

    Sun came out - rain died away and the wind eased to a light breeze.
    Still wet and despondent - no joy came.

    Home and dry, got out my pen and made my next To Do list.

    1. Get the pullpit fixed........... how?
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  8. #533
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Well, in some ways, you've already gotten the first dings, so less worry henceforth?


    There is that!
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  9. #534
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Beautiful boat, excellent work, great write-up!

    Pity about the collision. A few weeks after our last haul-out we swapped pens at the request of another member, and I had to shift the steel steps that I had made to bring the dock level down to where the boat usually sits (the pens are not floating ones). Put them in place, neighbour suggests that they are a bit close, I say "Nah, she'll be right," and next time I come down to the boat there's this nasty scar where the steps have been trashing my new paint and my teak toe rail...

    Then, in the storm we had a bit over a week ago, the surge was so high that it drowned our club boat ramp jetty, and lifted my bow rail so high it was striking the hose reel hanging from the post at the end of my pen. Between the additional height and the high winds, my bow rail took a beating. It's not really noticeable to others, I suspect, but that depressed feeling is one I really understand!

    Here's the water where there's usually a jetty:


    Flooded Jetty.jpg

    I haven't tried this, but I reckon a MAP gas torch would heat stainless tube sufficiently to bend it gently back to where it needs to sit.

    Cheers,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  10. #535
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Great story and congratulations on launching! A bent pulpit and a bit of a scuff seems like a pretty minor incident to me. Disheartening to be sure, after all the work you put in, but easy enough to fix.

  11. #536
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Thanks guys, appreciate the consoling words.
    There's a steel guy near me, old school welder. He's made up stainless parts for me in the past - I'll run it by him. Heat is likely with a bit of polishing to get the heat rash out.
    Worst case is a rebuild. I think there's about 5m of steel tube in there and two days of work - if he has the tools.

    John - that is a drag. That kind of constant wear chipping away would keep me awake.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  12. #537
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    Congratulations on getting her back in the water, and floating. Sorry about the stress and damage. I blame the idiot desk jockey who's been giving you grief about getting back onto the mooring by a random deadline. Without that you might have chosen better weather, a weekend when your wife was around to help and provide support. Could have been a much less stressful event. Still, you'll soon enough have the decks clean and the topside repainted. Nice new engine running like a charm. The cockpit bed sounds excellent. The pulpit might have to come off to be repaired I imagine. Easy done. My kids equate boat with noodles too.!

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  13. #538
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Bending things and a few scrapes are all part of owning a yacht and happen to us all! She's a beautiful boat and looking fantastic now - congratulations!

    Rick

  14. #539
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Well done Gypsy. And congrats for the courage to lay it all bare!
    On a lighter note... you would have had to pull out the "dads got it all under control face" a few times I reckon.
    I lived aboard for 2 years with my boys when they were young and know the face well.
    Well done all round!!

  15. #540
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    All kids seem to like noodles. I like noodles too, especially when aboard my boat. There is some kind of profound cosmic message in these observations, just not sure what it is.

  16. #541
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Small boats rock View Post
    All kids seem to like noodles. I like noodles too, especially when aboard my boat. There is some kind of profound cosmic message in these observations, just not sure what it is.
    Its the infinite twists and loops!
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  17. #542
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Back on the mooring.
    Sorry pic is a bit confused with those other boats in the background.

    IMG_5923.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  18. #543
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Such a pretty boat.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  19. #544
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    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Back on the mooring.
    Sorry pic is a bit confused with those other boats in the background.

    IMG_5923.jpg
    Pless would love it.

    Looks great.

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  20. #545
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Thanks guys,
    Took her for a first sail yesterday.

    I did some work on my mooring with a neighbour (who did the get in the water bit.....brrrr).
    My mooring has maybe 5m of 'long wall chain', then it had another 5m of 10mm chain, shackles, swivel and then the nylon rope riser (x2) to the mooring.

    The 10mm chain had lost about 30%. The swivel and shackles were in better condition.
    I took out the 10mm and left everything else. I installed 10m length of 14mm Dyneema (good for 21.7 tons), and new shackles/swivel. The Dyneema is spliced and then fixed to the shackles with a square lashing using dyneema string - which cuts the skin off your fingers.

    Tried to cut the dyneema rope with a scissors, to taper it into the splice - no go. Used a knife and after maybe 4 strands the knife had blunted.

    Then we went for a quick, 3 hour, sail to see if we could spot whales. A beautiful broad reach from Callala bay to the heads. Then a peek outside; big swell (my son called it 'big boy swell') for the about, and close hauled home. Took in the jib to make it a bit more comfortable.



    Thats on the way back.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  21. #546
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    She's romping along. That must have felt great. An absolute triumph!

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  22. #547
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    It was good.
    Feels a little surreal watching that little snippet. I recall pulling off the hardware with a real sense of dread that it would never go back on again.

    The reach across was a complete joy - one of those really beautiful hours where it all goes perfectly.
    That little video is back into a brisk little chop with the wind picking up - it was getting cold as the sun was setting and we hadn't brought any warm gear.
    But fun for sure.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  23. #548
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Yep, looks fantastic!

    You might want to look into your use of dyneema for mooring a little further. It's strong but susceptible to damage from bending, abrasion and UV. I'd be a bit worried about using it tied straight to the swivel or shackle underwater where you get corrosion and shell on the metal. Normally a thimble is used for the rope to shackle or swivel connection to protect the rope at that point. The mooring line that's commonly used is Aquatec, about 25mm. Aquatec is a lot cheaper than dyneema too, except that it's usually only available in a full spool of 250m. However, there's a company in Sydney called Ropes Galore which will sell Aquatec in short lengths - a bit dearer per metre than a full spool but not much and ..... who needs 250m of mooring line? I change mine every second year so I bought 50m to do me for the next 10 years or so. I think 25mm Aquatec works out at about $3-4/m from Ropes Galore and a whole spool is about $500.

    The other thing I do is leave the old chain and shackles in place when I replace chain with new chain etc. It does no harm, adds weight where you want it and makes mooring maintenance by SCUBA a whole lot easier as I don't have to cut the old shackles. Of course the time will come when I have to remove old chain but it'll be a lot easier to cut underwater by then.

    Rick

  24. #549
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    This company claims that dyneema is more abrasion resistant than other lines https://www.dsm.com/products/dyneema.../maritime.html

    Rick

  25. #550
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    She looks stunning Gypsie - I am very envious and am imagining Larrikin out there next year.......
    Larks

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    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
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  26. #551
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    Next year! Wow, better get cracking.

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  27. #552
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    No casual observer could ever imagine the amount of work you put into that nice deck job! Have a good winter; it is getting bloody hot here and the earthquakes are swarming! Those noodles look tempting!
    Jay

  28. #553
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Fantastic job Gypsie! So much work, and your account is a great read.
    If war is the answer........... it must be a profoundly stupid question

  29. #554
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    This company claims that dyneema is more abrasion resistant than other lines https://www.dsm.com/products/dyneema.../maritime.html

    Rick
    Not to mention UV won't be a problem under water... so that just leaves the bending issue.

  30. #555
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    It's not the part of the line under the water that breaks down. It's the bit that goes over the bow roller that is most vulnerable. That's why this is commonly covered with hose.

    Rick

  31. #556
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    It's not the part of the line under the water that breaks down. It's the bit that goes over the bow roller that is most vulnerable. That's why this is commonly covered with hose.

    Rick
    The part that goes over my bow roller is 40mm polyunsaturated something - which i see as consumable. It is in good condition. It is actually 2 - i tie off the second as a safety just in case a deck fitting fails.

    The Dynmeea attaches to a 1" bow shackle and then some bloody heavy longwall chain, which is attached to some train wheels. At the top it is bound fast to another shackle which attaches to a swivel. Then the part that leaves the water and comes over my bow roller is the 40mm. The whole top end of the assembly can be brought on deck for servicing, only the bottom shackle requires me to get wet. The swivel is the weak point, 3/4" - being able to inspect that easily is great.

    I'm sorry i didn't photograph the splice. It is fully bound in dynemma string. Wrapped up tight like a fist. This should protect it from shell growth that might cause wear. But the stuff is tough as. After working it, and loosing a layer of skin on my fingers, I'm really not worried about chafe.
    My expectation is as Rick describes - 2 years. I'll start collecting parts over the next 6 months and have a replacement line sitting in the shed. I'll decide if it needs to be swapped out at the end of next summer, before the water gets too cold.

    The neighbour who helped me recommends 16mm to 20mm 'Plasma', which is the rope used in winches. I couldn't get it bigger than 10mm in the time frame but i discussed the mooring scenario with the rope guy, Bryan, at Melbourne Ropes.
    Interestingly, his son is a physicist and he got him to do calculations. 10tn boat, in a 20knot wind with a 1m chop. Mooring line tied directly to the anchor (no spring).
    Nylon puts 600kg of shock load into your deck fitting. Dyneema puts up to 6,000kg of load on your fitting - no stretch.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  32. #557
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Sounds like you've certainly looked into it all - great!

    Rick

  33. #558
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Interesting numbers. I guess dyneema would make a really bad anchor line, imagine 6000kg plucking a hook off the bottom.

  34. #559
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    I wouldn't like to have a mooring in a spot which develops a one metre chop. That's pretty severe.

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  35. #560
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    A mater of mine here at Blairgowrie has dyneema as the ryder for his mooring.
    If war is the answer........... it must be a profoundly stupid question

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