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Thread: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

  1. #351
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Might be time to put a tarp over it and go home and face Christmas

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    Did better than that - I replaced the entire deck!



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  2. #352
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    This is too cool! Last Spring while in Auckland we went to the Maritime Museum (Because that's what I do!) and I saw a boat that caught my eye. Made a note of the TASMAN SEABIRD and looked it up when I finally got WiFi.
    And now I finally make it into the B/R forum and VOILA!
    Retired. I do what I want, when I want.

  3. #353
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Welcome Dave, glad to have you here.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  4. #354
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Would that stop it from firing up?
    Worth a mention is there is exhaust fumes, no excessive smoke. When turning it over it does seem to be burning what fuel is injected.


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    Absolutely, symptoms,.. gradually weaker power output over a period of time ,progressively harder to start. One day they don't start.
    Some boats have ball or gate valves on the exhaust outlet so they can shut off the exhaust in a seaway. That's worth checking too if you have one.
    Last edited by John B; 12-21-2018 at 05:16 AM.

  5. #355
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    .....may have been mentioned before but could there possibly be an engine de mobiliser / anti theft kill switch that has been inadvertently engaged?
    Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. Leonardo da Vinci.

    If war is the answer........... it must be a profoundly stupid question.

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  6. #356
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    It doesn't have an anti-theft switch. But it does have a trip instead of a fuse.
    When the switch trips it kills the elctrics so the starter motor doesn't run over.

    Got a new fuel feed pump - but it was faulty...... arghhh!
    Ordered another new one and returning the faulty one.

    Will check the exhaust elbow for a blockage next time i'm at the yard. Hopefully this weekend.

    Its now worth me thinking about other 'yard' work i can do.
    The cockpit is the last place now letting in rain water. The drains on the lockers are truly bad - I just don't know what the builder was thinking. Or maybe they did work once upon a time but its hard to see how.
    I'm of a mind to pull out the whole set up and build from scratch, but i am also reluctant to lose the last of the teak work.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  7. #357
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    The other nefarious and sneaky engine stopper is a blocked exhaust elbow.
    I tried a working version of the higher pressure lift pump and no joy.
    I popped off the water feed to the mixing elbow and there is no blockage. I turned the mtor over and filled the cockpit lockers with stinky fumes.

    which annoys me - if its burning fuel to make those fumes, how come its not firing up......?
    The only thing i can think is injector pump not vapourising/pressurising the fuel enough.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  8. #358
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    Start ya bastard. Give it a good squirt and keep squirting for a while. Rev the bejeezus out of it.

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  9. #359
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Tried it.
    it gave off an alarming rattle after a while.
    Also tried WD40 which is meant to work - it's just kero i believe.

    Neither even gives a cough now.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  10. #360
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    Not good.

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  11. #361
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Greetings,

    Just read through this thread today, really learned a lot. Thanks for all of the photos! WBF at it's best!

    Ironic how a petroleum contraption can mess up a natural carriage. Will be watching your journey closely! So much to learn!

    Eric
    Last edited by FishoutaFlorida; 01-10-2019 at 10:24 PM.
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

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  12. #362
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Valves? Worth a look if you havent already. I always thought that as they wear valves would just not open quite as much, but they can do exactly the opposite, they hammer away into the valve seat, and eventually dont close properly. So it might be worth removing the valve cover and checking that all the tappets do actually tap.

  13. #363
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Yep, valves is on my list of suspects.
    Clogged injectors too.

    getting the top on and of the motor is no picnic, so first preference is to get a mechanic in with some tools to pressure test.
    Also, if i get the chance before, I'll try and pull an injector. They were locked in solid when i tried the last time. The mechanic can bench test the injector.

    Over the phone, mechanics thinking is blocked injectors. He knows the motor and says it could easily happen to all four simultaneously. Four sets of valves going kaput at the same time might be a bit further into unlikely though.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  14. #364
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Hey Eric,
    Welcome. Hope your move is going okay.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  15. #365
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Do you have a quote for head reco, injector reco, pump reco?
    At some stage it may get close to the cost of a new motor???

  16. #366
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    A mate put a new beta 30hp in his timber bay cruiser last year.
    He'd been having nonstop issues with an old yanmar since he bought the boat.
    He did the instal himself and did the whole thing including a new prop (old one was too big for the new motor I believe) for under 12k I think.
    He now cruises at 7knt up from 5knts with the old motor.
    He also got about 1k for the old motor as well.

    I've got a beta 20 in my h28, it would be nearly 20 years old with 500h on the clock. As long as your service it regularly it runs like a dream. It's a pretty simple motor but has a few good features such as an oil spout on top of the motor to pump the old oil out for a service.
    A few of us where trying to convince him to go electric with large solar panels but he wanted a put put engine. I wouldn't mine putting an electric in mine with a small genset if I ever have to do a motor replacement



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  17. #367
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Thanks for that insight James.
    I am erring on the side of Beta. No engine will be perfect in all things, but a record of being strong and reliable in real life is a good endorsement.
    Thanks
    Trev
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  18. #368
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Geftb View Post
    Do you have a quote for head reco, injector reco, pump reco?
    At some stage it may get close to the cost of a new motor???
    Haven't got a quote, but the assessment of the mechanic, who is considered a good one by my yard-mates, is even then the components are old and general condition of the motor is poor. Even with reconditioned bit, the other bits will fail sometime soon.

    Even diesel motors die at some point.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  19. #369
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    I have accepted that the motor needs to go.
    Just fishing around for finance for a new motor. Looking in earnest at the Beta 30. Compare and contrast to the Nanni and very little in it except marginal price with the Beta being a smidge cheaper.

    To that end, I pulled off the bulkhead between the cabin and the engine bay.
    IMG_5470.jpg

    I didn't take consumable shots of this. I was simply recording the process so i could reinstall correctly.

    Pulled off some bits like the alternator.
    IMG_5490.jpg

    photographed the wiring incase it ever needs to go back together. Which is unlikely. Not my me anyway.
    and some details for the new install. The raw water feed hose, 7/8" - i think the beta is 3/4". Who does 7/8"?

    IMG_5492.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  20. #370
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    Almost worth a new thread! I hope the changeover goes smoothly. Have you looked at physical characteristics in your choice of motor, ie which one will require the least surgery to get into the boat?

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Now that the deck is solid and I'm satisfied there are no leaks.
    The boat experienced some heavy rain and exposed a leak forward where i hadn't bitten down on a fastener. Re-gooped and tightened up, next downpour showed no leak.
    This is the first time in a long time the boat is leak free.

    Except........

    The bilge still filled up. (On the hard!)

    My only conclusion is the cockpit whose drains are woefully inadequate, is leaking at a heary rate. Mostly because the boat is slightly listing to starboard on the cradle, so the forward edge fills up in a shower.
    I popped off one of the locker hatches and was throwing it out. Had a change of mind and thought, if i think it through a bit i can have my teak cockpit and good drainage.

    2016-04-19 14.18.48.jpg

    One of the challenges with the lockers is the apperature is small. It's a squeeze to get in and access the motor and electrics. And a sail bag is a tight squeeze that will eventually cause damage.

    I noticed the bilge pump wiring was ciorroded at a join. I replaced the spade connector and it pumped out the bilge.
    Went home, had a think.

    And a think.

    Really nothing for it except pull out the cockpit and install bigger locker doors and deeper drains. Fiber glass and epoxy the lot.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  22. #372
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    So i started.

    Lockers off, port side teak under attack.

    IMG_5502.jpg

    I have no idea why, and in retrospect it was a bit foolish; but i thought because the teak in the cokpit was in such good condition that it would be free of the ailments of the rest of the deck. That is, rot.

    How wrong! And now feeling quite a bit of relief that i pulled it up - and a small bit of regret that i didn't do it when doing the deck.

    IMG_5503.jpg

    First of the rot is immediately apparant.
    The coaming along the join is also rotten to at least a third of the thickness of the ply if not deeper. Hence the regret at not doing it with the deck. Had i discovered it then, I'd simply have pulled the all the coaming off and done it again. As is, this'll be a bit trickier now that the deck is so bloody well attached to the outside of the coaming.

    The teak in the cockpit has a substrata of fiberglass. Through which the teak was nailed - which kinda begs the question - why?

    IMG_5504.jpg

    IMG_5505.jpg

    Again finding evidence that the teak was probably laid on top of an earlier, if not the original, ply deck.
    Older cockpit drain, filled with goop, right in the corner which would have drained into the saloon area and probably meant a big piece of plumbing in the way of everything.

    IMG_5506.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  23. #373
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Some serious rot. Again with the compost - rich dark soil, you could grow vegetables in.

    IMG_5509.jpg

    Bench tops gone. The area left in this picture straddles the bulkhead between engine bay and saloon. On the starboard side, immediately under that panel, are all the electrics.

    IMG_5511.jpg

    I didn't take a picture of the whole thing gone. I spent an hour trying to figure out how to tarp it successfully. In the end i used 2 tarps that would drain into the cockpit sole.

    Great chance to paint the inside.
    I'll see how i go, but i might keep all this out until the new motor is in. It wll make installation a lot easier.
    The motor is not actually under the cockpit floor, it is slightly forward. The gearbox is more or less under the forward edge of the sole. So the motor will have to be led through to the saloon and lifted out through the hatch.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  24. #374
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Yep. I've replaced Masina's cockpit floor with a removable hatch. Lockers were already big enough and drain well. Great to be able to access the top of the engine so easily!

    Rick

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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Having once stuck a monstrosity on the back of the boat in the form of a solar panel, I am reluctant to do it again.
    But - i came across a windvane steering system for a price i couldn't resist.

    Its a neat little system and i hope not too intrusive.

    Here's the frame hanging in place.

    IMG_5467.jpg

    And from the side.

    IMG_5468.jpg

    I admit, I am nervous of the impact on aesthetics. Also wondering about the folly of a thing that is for long distance cruising.
    I do have an eye to ocean sailing, Lord Howe is on our bucket list. So then it makes sense - but in the meantime......

    I'll have to remove those nice stern fairleads to make way for it.
    I'll make pads that fit the feet of the frame and build a piece that fills infront of the stern toerail piece.
    There will also be supports, seen hanging down, that go to the transom. Those supports are too short so i'm having a couple made up that are about 30cm longer.

    IMG_5514.jpg

    I popped off the fairleads and ill need to scrape off that hardened goop, and fill the holes.
    The toe rail is 3 pieces of 15mm ply at that point - so easy to replicate the depth. the compound curve will take a bit of sculpting on site.
    Last edited by gypsie; 02-21-2019 at 10:53 PM.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  26. #376
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Almost worth a new thread! I hope the changeover goes smoothly. Have you looked at physical characteristics in your choice of motor, ie which one will require the least surgery to get into the boat?
    Yeah, they have very similar footprints.
    The beta drive shaft from the transmission, is about 20mm lower than existing. But there's enough play on the mounting feet to accomodate that. The Beta guys also had a look at it.

    My prop diameter is also within range, but only a 2 bladed unit so not as efficient as a 3 or 5!

    I am wondering about the pitch of the prop. Mine is variable, but very manually. You gotta take it apart and physically reset it.
    This is it here https://www.pyiinc.com/downloads/max...structions.pdf I haven't measured it but at a guess 16" to 18". Beta suggests a 16".
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  27. #377
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Now that you're going the whole hog, I suggest this:
    1. Remove everything you can.
    2. Sit the engine in place with props and then go through the motions of servicing, maintenance, general use, and then measure and mark where you need space and where you need things. It's an extra crane lift but well worth it.
    3. Lift the engine out.
    4. Build the new cockpit.

    The best single thing I've done it open up a big, removable hatch from the cabin through to the engine. Gives me access to the engine, cockpit drains, water inlet, drinking water system etc.

    Also, make provision for simple GRP trays under the engine to catch all drips etc.

    Rick

  28. #378
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    I think the wind vane is a Hasler - though it looks more curvy that the right angled fabrication in the images i've seen.
    Here's the same one as mine on another boat. https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/aspl...rop/1208108154

    Ring any bells with anyone?
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  29. #379
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    Now that you're going the whole hog, I suggest this:
    1. Remove everything you can.
    2. Sit the engine in place with props and then go through the motions of servicing, maintenance, general use, and then measure and mark where you need space and where you need things. It's an extra crane lift but well worth it.
    3. Lift the engine out.
    4. Build the new cockpit.

    The best single thing I've done it open up a big, removable hatch from the cabin through to the engine. Gives me access to the engine, cockpit drains, water inlet, drinking water system etc.

    Also, make provision for simple GRP trays under the engine to catch all drips etc.

    Rick
    Thanks Rick,
    i'd considered some of your list. Good to have the reminder.

    The whole bulkhead i removed could very easily be a door. I'll look at how i do that. Having said that - it was pretty easy to remove, but probably not something i would want to do underway.
    Oil catcher! Good reminder. I really want to do something like that - absolutely. With a small drain into some kind of readily swapped out container.
    Fit, remove, install - I can see the wisdom in that. I liked your SS footings over your logs. I may consider that - or make up the 20mm difference with hard wood shoes. I have some Ironbark at home.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  30. #380
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Thanks Rick,
    i'd considered some of your list. Good to have the reminder.

    The whole bulkhead i removed could very easily be a door. I'll look at how i do that. Having said that - it was pretty easy to remove, but probably not something i would want to do underway.
    Oil catcher! Good reminder. I really want to do something like that - absolutely. With a small drain into some kind of readily swapped out container.
    Fit, remove, install - I can see the wisdom in that. I liked your SS footings over your logs. I may consider that - or make up the 20mm difference with hard wood shoes. I have some Ironbark at home.
    I'm pretty sure that the beta has an oil spout on the top of the motor for changing the oil (Atleast my beta 20 does)
    It's a curved spout with what looks like a garden tap handle. It made changing the oil a breeze, unscrew the cap off the spout, turn the handle and pump!
    No reaching under the sump to undo a plug to drain the oil into a container which is too small...…
    This doesn't catch any drips or anything from bleeding the motor or any leaks but makes changing the oil easy.

  31. #381
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    Yeah, you are right. It does.
    But I'm thinking more, as you describe, accidental or incidental spills. During oil change, even coolant filling and do on. Hopefully leaky seals won't be a problem.

    I really want clean white bilges



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  32. #382
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    Moving along.
    Here's an image of the engine bay with the bulkhead section removed.

    IMG_5524.jpg

    I've also since pulled out that switch panel you can see in the top right. They may be the original switches because they are extremely brittle and keep snapping. They are also a bit of a bugger to access to i will take them out of there and put them on the starboard side by the nav table. Most of the panels and instruments you can see on that panel are redundant, so a great chance to rationalise and pull out masses of unwanted cables.

    Here's the motor close up. The picture doesn't do justice to the poor condition of the motor nor the clean up job required for the engine bay. Decades of grease, diesel and oil.
    I got stuck in with degreaser and a power hose. very little impact. I'm wondering if there is a paint out there that will happly be applied over a greasy surface. Some solid paving or industrial floor paint maybe.

    IMG_5525.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  33. #383
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    On with some other little jobs.
    Put a top coat in the V-berth space. All nice and white now. Sparkling
    no pics

    pulled out the old log. After that video that was posted about the boat sinking when the log got pushed back into the boat. Possibly by a crane lift.
    Redundant piece of kit and a through hull so best to be rid of it.

    IMG_5528.jpg

    Here's what the hole looked like.

    IMG_5527.jpg

    Visible is the plastic tub that sheathed the log itself. the sheath is rebated into the hull.
    It was a bit of a battle to remove. I had to cut a beautiful piece of bronze and some corroded screw heads.
    Was left with this.

    IMG_5529.jpg

    Got a piece of 2" DF stock and made a plug for the hole. Slightly oversize. Took a bit of sculpting, slowly slowly, on the day to fit in the hole, but got a very snug fit.
    Also a cap of 6mm marine ply to fit into the rebated section.

    IMG_5539.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  34. #384
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    My mate helped with knocking up a gantry to remove the motor.
    removing isn't such a precious job, the motor is toast. Just got to be careful with the interior joinery in the boat. But the gantry, i hope, wil prove its worth when installing the new motor.

    50mm x 50mm x 3mm box steel.

    IMG_5543.jpg

    IMG_5544.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  35. #385
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    Default Re: 1962 Tasman Seabird - New Deck

    While that was happening, 13yo spied the postmans bike and wanted it to run.
    So we ducked between the gantry construction and various posty bike things.
    Here he pulls apart and cleans his first carby!

    IMG_5546.jpg

    getting the gantry onto the boat was fraught, but we got it up without a hitch.
    I didn't take pictures of the process which was fiddly. we lifted the motor, moved it forward a few inches, dropped it. adjusted straps, lifted again and so on until it was in the cabin.
    Then a big hoist through the hatch.
    it went smoothly. It's still sitting there in the cockpit waiting for the yard hiab to come pull it down.

    IMG_5548.jpg

    IMG_5550.jpg

    IMG_5549.jpg

    Nanni gearbox with about 200 hours on it.

    My biggest fear during the lift was we might crack the oil hose coming out of the sump.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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