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Thread: The demise of boat language

  1. #141
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Ski-Patroller View Post
    Just a dumb question, why are foot braces called stretchers in a row boat?

    And another, why is the section of oar between the oarlock and the grip called a loom?
    Nothing on stretcher
    Definition of boat-stretcher in English:
    boat-stretcher

    noun


    • A board in a boat against which a rower presses the feet for support.

    Origin

    Mid 19th century; earliest use found in Blackwood's Magazine.

    loom in British 1

    (luːm )
    noun1. an apparatus, worked by hand (hand loom) or mechanically (power loom), for weaving yarn into a textile

    2. the middle portion of an oar, which acts as a fulcrum swivelling in the rowlock


    Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers

    Word origin of 'loom'

    C13 (meaning any kind of tool): variant of Old English gelōma tool; compare heirloom
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #142
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    I also learned to say, "Ready about. Helm down."
    Swmbo and family say,"Ready about. About." ,and it leaves me waiting,anticipating,"About what?", while they are all jumping ,shouting and throwing things.
    R
    We used for tacking "ready about .... lee oh" and for gybing "ready to gybe ..... gybe oh"
    On another forum a thread on this topic ran to 110 posts!

    Definition from Practical Boat Owner
    Gybe-o!

    Helmsman’s warning call to crew members who have just had their hats knocked off by his unpremeditated gybe.

  3. #143

    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I like correct terminology as it is specific to being correct. Lets say, the night is dark and your boat is taking on water from a sprung butt block and you need help so, while you are trying to father the leak with padding and a sail that is to be dragged under the hull you tell one of the crew to look in the port lazzerett and in the outboard after end, you will find a box that contains a very pistol and a sealed bag of star shells. Bring them to me!

    Or would you rather hear, look in the little side cubboard that is on the left back end of the cockpit and bring me the funny looking gun and the rocket loads for it?

    Here is another one for a dark night when the lookout spots an unlit tanker mooring bouy off the power plant at Huntington Beach CA and you are hitting nearly seven kts. under sail in the Tri-Island Race! Would you say, " bouy ahead port your helm!" or "come hard left now! bouy dead ahead" The ten meter "Sally" once lost her stem hitting one of those bad boys in the dark of night and barely made it back home!
    Jay

    I would say that if you expect people to find things in the dark, during an emergency, you should teach them in the light. You train ahead of time.

    As far as helm commands, you should use what ever the crew has practiced.

  4. #144
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    What I like about our forum is that it provides room for creative thinking!
    Jay

  5. #145
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    5B055A10-4F10-4683-B455-AFEF02582C26.jpg
    What’s the little stabby bit at the end of a sprit called? The stabby bit that gets stabbed into the grommet or cringle or strop or loop or whatever at the peak or clew corner of a sail.

    Seriously. Does it have a name?

    Peace,
    Robert

  6. #146
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    "stabby bit" sounds good. Or maybe "pokey bit"? Of course if it's poorly made, it'd be a "hokey pokey bit"
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #147
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    What’s the little stabby bit at the end of a sprit called? The stabby bit that gets stabbed into the grommet or cringle or strop or loop or whatever at the peak or clew corner of a sail.

    Seriously. Does it have a name?
    That's a " sprit end" as Opti sailors will attest.

    They come in a variety of configurations. Here is another:

    Screen Shot 2018-09-12 at 1.50.11 PM.jpg

    Kevin

    PS: I like pointy bit better.
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  8. #148
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    "stabby bit" sounds good. Or maybe "pokey bit"? Of course if it's poorly made, it'd be a "hokey pokey bit"
    Oldest Son calls it a “Get In The (17 Redacted Words) Hole, You (4 Redacted Words) Thing!”

    He coined that phrase when the “safety lanyard” parted and he had to jab the pin into the peak loop while standing in our 12 foot sailboat. It was more Buster Keaton than dangerous, so I was laughing, and he was turning the sea and air cobalt with exasperation.

    He still curls his lip at the sight of a sprit sail. Sprit booms are okay, sort of.

    Did I mention I plan to use a sprit sail on the trimaran. Hehe.

    Peace,
    Robert

    P.S. He won’t sail the duck punt, either. Not with “one of those” on board. Hehehe.

  9. #149
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    "What’s the little stabby bit at the end of a sprit called?"

    Codpiece?
    Last edited by mmd; 09-12-2018 at 01:30 PM.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  10. #150
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    "stabby bit" sounds good. Or maybe "pokey bit"? Of course if it's poorly made, it'd be a "hokey pokey bit"
    Well, if you call it that, you have to turn it all about...
    Heute ist so ein schöne Tag...

  11. #151
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Most of the racing sailors I know around here, (big boats, not dinghys) refer to the helmsman as "the driver". Not sure where that came from.

    I always had trouble referring to dinghy sailors as Yachtsmen. One of the three racing clubs I have been in called itself a Yacht Club, the other two called themselves Sailing Clubs. I never think of an open boat as a Yacht.

  12. #152
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcodger View Post
    We used for tacking "ready about .... lee oh" and for gybing "ready to gybe ..... gybe oh"
    On another forum a thread on this topic ran to 110 posts!

    Definition from Practical Boat Owner
    Gybe-o!

    Helmsman’s warning call to crew members who have just had their hats knocked off by his unpremeditated gybe.
    In all the boats I've been in, it was "Gybe-O Duck", to avoid having your head taken off, by the boom, or even worse the lever vang on my Windmill and I 470. On my Thistle, the boom is so low that the skipper has to crouch on the bottom behind the centerboard box, and even then the mainsheet from the traveler to the turning block, is supported in a trough under the boom to keep it from strangling the skipper.

    The warning for tacking was usually "Ready about" then "Helms Down"

  13. #153
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    5B055A10-4F10-4683-B455-AFEF02582C26.jpg
    What’s the little stabby bit at the end of a sprit called? The stabby bit that gets stabbed into the grommet or cringle or strop or loop or whatever at the peak or clew corner of a sail.

    Seriously. Does it have a name?

    Peace,
    Robert
    When this discussion has come up in a dinghy class where many crews are women, the discussion was anything but serious. :-)

  14. #154
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    In all the boats I've been in, it was "Gybe-O Duck", to avoid having your head taken off, by the boom, or even worse the lever vang on my Windmill and I 470. On my Thistle, the boom is so low that the skipper has to crouch on the bottom behind the centerboard box, and even then the mainsheet from the traveler to the turning block, is supported in a trough under the boom to keep it from strangling the skipper.

    The warning for tacking was usually "Ready about" then "Helms Down"
    In my crowd its; "Ready about; Hard a'lee!" and gybing is, "Gybe, Ho!"

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  15. #155
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    One definite advantage in using "driver" is that it's not sexist, and less clumsy that "helmsperson".

    In a sport that is often criticised for being snobby, the use of self-deprecating terms can seem to be healthy. While one can understand those who respect nautical tradition, if we are racing high-performance beach cats we're not sailing square riggers (in itself perhaps the wrong term) around Cape Horn, and perhaps therefore it's wrong to try to sound as if we were. It would be a bit like using terms that are used by Everest climbers if you're doing parkour or indoor climbing.

    We often talk of "doing an around" in racing dinghies and cats, and sometimes on the yacht. It's actually an indication that we're in a good mood - when it's all gone to hell or in critical situations it's more like "let's tack" (which IMHO sounds less like an all-powerful Master under God commanding the crew to "ready about") followed by "going" as the boat starts turning, and (if we're roll tacking) "in....out....back" to coordinate bodyweight shifts. Underlying this is the knowledge that when we're racing dinghies, we're a long way outside the arena of traditional maritime practise and lore, so using the terms associated with tradition can appear pretentious.

    As I tried to use irony to say in an earlier post, if we get too precious and pedantic, aren't we in danger of ending up sounding like the archetypal Victorian spinster, having vapours whenever anyone uses "improper" language?

    Like SkipPatroller, I don't refer to dinghy sailors as yachtsmen. However, one thing that seems to underline how arbitrary nautical terms are is the fact that if one crosses the state border, dinghies WERE traditionally often referred to as "yachts", as they were in New Zealand. One can see reasons in the local history of small-boat sailing for the difference, but doesn't it show how much such uses are merely the custom of one group or the other, rather than being correct or incorrect?

    PS - But of course, these remarks doesn't apply to anyone who uses the term "skiff" to a small racing sailboat that has no true relationship to "real" racing skiffs. In that case, and that alone, anyone using the traditional term too loosely has blindly accepted mindless marketing drivel and should be keelhauled. Thus it has been spake.
    Last edited by Chris249; 09-13-2018 at 01:24 AM.

  16. #156
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    5B055A10-4F10-4683-B455-AFEF02582C26.jpg
    What’s the little stabby bit at the end of a sprit called? The stabby bit that gets stabbed into the grommet or cringle or strop or loop or whatever at the peak or clew corner of a sail.

    Seriously. Does it have a name?

    Peace,
    Robert
    That might be a pintle

  17. #157
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Reuel Parker in his article on sprit rigs in this month's WB calls it a "nipple". Works for me.

  18. #158
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris249 View Post
    One definite advantage in using "driver" is that it's not sexist, and less clumsy that "helmsperson".
    I have generally referred to the person at the helm...."the helm" not gender specific......

  19. #159
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    5B055A10-4F10-4683-B455-AFEF02582C26.jpg
    What’s the little stabby bit at the end of a sprit called? The stabby bit that gets stabbed into the grommet or cringle or strop or loop or whatever at the peak or clew corner of a sail.

    Seriously. Does it have a name?
    Spigot?
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  20. #160
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris249 View Post
    In a sport that is often criticised for being snobby, the use of self-deprecating terms can seem to be healthy.
    I considered insisting on being called Rear Admiral, with an emphasis on Rear.
    I just can't bring myself to call my boat a yacht, though it is undoubtedly so. I exclusively refer to it as a boat. Which, i understand, in the navy means she's a submarine.

    What about calling a boat a 'she'?
    Last edited by gypsie; 09-13-2018 at 01:37 AM.
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  21. #161
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Here we are , is it twelve hundred, or midnight, or tomorrow, ? or twenty four hundred ?

  22. #162
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Here we are , is it twelve hundred, or midnight, or tomorrow, ? or twenty four hundred ?
    Eight bells.
    or
    Look out the window, is it dark?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  23. #163
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Twelve hundred is only noon.

    Twenty four hundred is midnight.

    The next minute is "oh zero hundred" but many find it easier to say "twenty four oh one".

    Or, if that's when you show up to stand watch, the hand you're relieving will mark the time with, "You're #%@%ing late."

  24. #164
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Here we are , is it twelve hundred, or midnight, or tomorrow, ? or twenty four hundred ?
    Actually, the 24 hour clock is the most common timekeeping system in the world. The 12 hour clock that most of the English-speaking world uses is the jargon.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  25. #165
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Hopefully a reader of O'Brian may know this one: Why is a short watch called a 'dog watch'?

  26. #166
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    Hopefully a reader of O'Brian may know this one: Why is a short watch called a 'dog watch'?
    Because the are curtailed. "Cur tailed".

  27. #167
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    You've been through the series a few times, I see.

  28. #168
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    You've been through the series a few times, I see.
    Oh, yeah. Rather more than I care to admit.

  29. #169
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I learned a lot from those books but that joke was old to me by the time I read it.

  30. #170
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    I learned a lot from those books but that joke was old to me by the time I read it.
    Yes, I think much of O'Brian's dialog was cribbed from other sources. Which he is upfront about in his introductions. The attraction of the series is less in its originality than in the way all of the parts come together into an entirely satisfying whole.

  31. #171
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Maturin's malapropisms are a brilliant touch - especially when delivered in the form of an "explanation" to impressionable landsmen accompanying him on a passage.

  32. #172
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    Maturin's malapropisms are a brilliant touch - especially when delivered in the form of an "explanation" to impressionable landsmen accompanying him on a passage.
    Indeed, along with his discomfiture when caught out at the gunroom table and Jack's usually-too-late attempts to cover for him. So many human details in those books. One might argue that he recycles plot devices rather too often (just how many young, attractive, female spies does Stephen match wits with over the course of some long passage? Rather more than is believable at least.) But the dialog, the relationships and the descriptions of life aboard more than make up for that.

  33. #173
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Because the are curtailed. "Cur tailed".
    "A man who would pun would pick a pocket."

  34. #174
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Vince Brennan View Post
    "A man who would pun would pick a pocket."
    Ah! Another student of the series I see.

  35. #175
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I was on a tram the other day. Announcements at each stop, Exit on the right hand side, in the direction of travel. I was thinking, now here's where Port or Starboard would be useful, but of course trams don't turn around at the end of the line, the driver just grabs his lunch box and thermos and moves to the cab at the other end of the car. Which got me to wondering, what do they do on double ended ferries, like on Sydney Harbour, Australia.

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