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Thread: The demise of boat language

  1. #176
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I was on a tram the other day. Announcements at each stop, Exit on the right hand side, in the direction of travel. I was thinking, now here's where Port or Starboard would be useful, but of course trams don't turn around at the end of the line, the driver just grabs his lunch box and thermos and moves to the cab at the other end of the car. Which got me to wondering, what do they do on double ended ferries, like on Sydney Harbour, Australia.
    We have the same thing here on the Washington Ferries. I'm pretty sure that "port" and "starboard" are relative to which helm is being used. Kinda has to be that way as they would need to change nav lights (at least) as well to reflect which end is forward.

  2. #177

    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    The double ended ferry question is interesting. I might have to see if I know somebody that works on the Staten Island ferry and ask.

    I suspect that naming locations might have to be consistent, no matter which way the ferry is moving.

    Navigation (external references) will have to change.

  3. #178
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    The Washington State double-ended ferries have "end no.1" and "end no.2" Port and Starboard switch sides depending on which end is the bow.
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  4. #179
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    ^ Ya. Nav lights would have to display differently. Probably two sets installed, switched on and off depending upon direction. That's how it appears on a small local ferry around here. ( Photo from the ferry's website) The extra light shown on the one mast is probably the anchor light--only need one of those.

    Ferry.jpg

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  5. #180
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    Feb 2002
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    Shubenacadie NS
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I smoked that one right away as well Ian. Anybody belong to the Patrick O'Brian Appreciation society Facebook Group?
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  6. #181
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    Jun 2018
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    Southeast MA, USA
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    51

    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I worked on an old schooner and one term we used was "scandalize the mainsail". It meant to depower the main - we eased the peak halyard.
    Actually found it in a dictionary.

    scandalize[skan-dl-ahyz]
    ExamplesWord Origin
    verb (used with object), scan·dal·ized, scan·dal·iz·ing.
    • to shock or horrify by something considered immoral or improper.
    • Nautical. to spill the wind from or reduce the exposed area of (a sail) in an unusual manner.


    Some of the crew were having fun one day - and when a call came to "Scandalize the main" - We yelled at it and said it's mother was a bedsheet.



  7. #182
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    Aug 2009
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    Olympia, WA, USA
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I worked on an old schooner and one term we used was "scandalize the mainsail".
    One of my favorite terms, and one of my favorite pieces of seamanship.

    Alex

  8. #183
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    Jan 2008
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    Lake Champlain, Vermont
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    I smoked that one right away as well Ian. Anybody belong to the Patrick O'Brian Appreciation society Facebook Group?
    I did not know they had such a thing. I just finished reading all 21 of the Jack Aubrey books. Wonderful.

  9. #184
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    Jun 2003
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    Central Coast, Ca
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    21,379

    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Quote Originally Posted by Pitsligo View Post
    One of my favorite terms, and one of my favorite pieces of seamanship.

    Alex
    I wonder if hauling up the boom by the reef clew falls under the term scandalizing? I think yes...
    I do that to both reduce sail and keep the boom out of the water. (A common enough San Francisco bay technique, as it is impossible to let out the main when the boom is dragging in the water)

  10. #185
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I wonder if hauling up the boom by the reef clew falls under the term scandalizing? I think yes...
    Not that I've heard of, myself, but I won't get huffy if someone else says it does. Heck, I'm not sure I'd heard of the clew reef pendant being used that way --but it's clever. I've always heard it referred to as "topping up" when the topping lifts are used.

    I know the clews of loose-footed fore-and-aft mains (gaff rig or sprit rig) can be "brailed up" or "clewed up" to achieve a similar de-powering effect as scandalizing, albeit with a higher CE resulting. I believe Cunliffe even shows examples of simultaneous brailing up and scandalizing, to really down-power the rig, e.g. while stopping for lunch at anchor.

    Alex

  11. #186
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I think "scandalizing" is used for turning a boat downwind more than jiffy reefing.
    I've had several gaffers that had the rudder become completely ineffective in big puffs of wind due to the big leech of a gaff main.

  12. #187
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    BC Coast
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Scandalizing a gaff sail has alway been in my point of view a very short term solution for reducing a sail.....you get a squall and she starts really bitching and working hard...if it looks like a short weather phenomena, then scandalizing the main reduces the helm problem almost instantly, and eases the excitement with the sail equally as fast. It does put some extra strain on the sail, now supported by the throat, and the topping lift. It also leaves the gaff swinging around up there.
    I have tried this out a number of times and it worked well enough, but I was never really happy with it compared to a proper reef which takes somewhat more time a minute or so rather than a fraction of a minute, to do properly, but is usually better all round....at least to my way of thinking.

  13. #188
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    Scandalizing a gaff sail has alway been in my point of view a very short term solution for reducing a sail...
    Agreed, 100%. I'll use it coming in to a mooring or dock, to downpower the rig and slow the boat, or to get through a squall, or preliminary to reefing. Not more than a couple minutes. Any more than that, reef properly.

    Alex

  14. #189
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    May 2007
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    Seattle
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    Default Re: The demise of boat language

    I always viewed scandalizing the main as putting on the brakes. A quick and dirty way to de-power the rig
    Elect a clown expect a circus

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