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Thread: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Eagle River, Wisconsin
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

    I don't really know how long since it's been started...pulled the dipstick and the oil looked great, then pulled the oil filter and it was pretty dark....so it wasn't put away well....perhaps tomorrow I'll check the compression, connect the battery and see......
    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Eagle River, Wisconsin
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

    I pulled the filter and it has a NAPA 1062, so I picked up two Wix filters.... I thought I read between 120 and 150 while cranking...
    Wow, big difference between your front cylinder and the rear cylinders....
    Your engine runs like the old Harley Motercycles.......:-)
    Mike

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Concord, NH, USA
    Posts
    314

    Default Re: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

    One other important thing. You probably know this, but you need a supply of water to the cooling system. Either the boat needs to be in the water, or you need a "fake-a-lake" type of thing to supply water with a hose to the fresh water intake under the boat. Running it dry will destroy the impeller in the water pump. I made one from a toilet plunger and some plumbing fittings that let me connect it to a garden hose so I could run the engine on the trailer.

    Jeff

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    shelton, ct, usa
    Posts
    249

    Default Re: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

    might be a good idea to put a little oil into the cyl's via the plug holes first, if it's been years since last run, cyl. walls could be very dry? crank it over a few turns with the plugs out. also if the walls are dry your compression readings won't be really accurate and will be low. Don't see a real good reason to do a comp. check before you start it ( it WILL start as long as it's got gas and spark) As to water - I used to disconnect the suction hose from the water pump to the thru-hull when the boat was on land and routed it to a 5 gal bucket fed from a garden hose - that way your not force feeding the water pump and can tell if it's really pumping at the same time? just my opinion, good luck..

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Eagle River, Wisconsin
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

    Thanks for all your input....will be sure to supply water to the engine before a full start.....
    Mike

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    20,766

    Default Re: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

    In this case some oil in the cylinders is indeed a good idea. Note that the spark plug is usually directly over the valves and the oil needs to be "aimed" at the cylinder. And oil in the cylinders before a compression test may give you a false reading. The oil will make a temporary seal at the piston rings, giving a higher than normal reading if the rings are "tired". This is a standard test to check for for valve vs. ring issues. The first test would be done "dry" and the numbers noted. The second test done "wet" and noted to determine the ring seal.
    A final "leak down test" using compressed air and gauges, noting pressure loss and listening to leakage will complete that diagnostic work.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leak-down_tester

    (you can buy a "leak down" tester for less than $50)

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,000

    Default Re: Chrysler Flathead 6, 1956 Manual

    As mentioned above, a compression test at this time is all but a waste of time, and a leakdown test now is worth even less. A compression test is a good idea ONLY to tell you if all the valves are working, or if you have a stuck valve (not uncommon on a flathead). Don't pay any attention to the numbers of a compression test now, just look to see that you have 'something', ... even if it is just 5 - 10 lbs. (After sitting for 14 years the compression numbers on my engines were all over the place (10 - 80 or so). After running them for three months they are all good and within 10% of each other.)

    If you do have a stuck valve sometimes you can see which one is stuck by looking through the spark plug hole. If you can see it you can spray WD40 under the valve head with the straw attachment and try to hit the valve stem, and if you are lucky a gentle tap on the valve head with a brass rod will drop it down. A number of cycles like this and it may well start cooperating. Just make sure the cam is not holding the valve open (may have to rotate the engine some).

    A couple of squirts of oil in each cylinder is a very good idea. They are simple engines and you shouldn't have trouble getting it going.

    I also use the 5 gallon pail of water with the cooling water intake stuck in it for cooling.

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