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Thread: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

  1. #1
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    Default Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    I recently had the very great good fortune to make an offshore passage on a beautiful Gartside yawl. Dave and Rosemary Lesser asked me to crew for them as they took their boat, La Vie En Rose, from Victoria, BC to San Francisco.

    The building of the boat was documented by Dave in this thread.

    Our host, WoodenBoat magazine, did a feature article on her in the Jan/Feb 2018 issue. In the article, Dave talks about the extensive collaboration between Paul Gartside, himself and Eric Jespersen, the builder, to realize the dream. Dave himself laid out the collaboration process in this thread.

    Since launching in 2012, the Lessers have cruised La Vie En Rose in the PNW for several years, culminating in a circumnavigation of Vancouver Island earlier this summer, documented in their blog.

    Now it was time for the first leg of a long-planned offshore adventure. As neither of them had extensive bluewater experience, Dave and Rosemary thought the first leg might go easier with a third crew member to help ease the watch-keeping load in the crowded waters between the Strait of Juan de Fuca and San Francisco and were kind enough to think of me.

    Just before casting off the lines in Sidney


    We left their slip in Sidney, BC before dawn on a Friday morning, motoring in calm conditions, with the ebb tide boosting us south through Sidney Channel and alongside James Island. The sun was very orange as it rose, a consequence of smoke on the air from the forest fires in the interior, smoke which is still lingering nearly two weeks later.

    Orange sunrise



    The surface off Trial Island, as we entered the Strait of Juan de Fuca, was disturbed and confused by the huge volume of water that comes down Haro Strait and makes a right turn there. Lots of freighter traffic in the Strait, with several waiting for a pilot off Victoria and we had to change course to avoid this freighter, running light, headed for Vancouver.

    The KM Yokohama off Trial Island


    We motored the rest of the way in the calm across the Strait to Port Angeles, arriving about 1300 to clear US Customs and to stock up on fresh provisions for the voyage. We walked into town for lunch at a nice restaurant, then over to the grocery store. Coming out, the sole taxi in town happened to be out front but was already spoken for, so we walked the ¾ of a mile back to the marina with the bags. It was OK as we needed the exercise anyway (or at least I did).
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    It was the three of you? That must 've been nice. Dave and Rosemary are not rude.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    It was the three of you? That must 've been nice. Dave and Rosemary are not rude.
    Yes, just the three of us. Dave and Rosemary are a delight to sail with.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    We stayed overnight in Port Angeles and headed out before dawn again, again in calm, to catch the ebb which we hoped would carry us out to Neah Bay.

    Out of Port Angeles to get around Ediz Hook


    It had rained a little overnight and the sky looked as if it would deliver more rain before the day was done. While there was no wind, the outgoing tide produced a lot of disturbed water alongside Ediz hook and what felt like ocean swells further along, even though we were still more than 40 miles from the open ocean. The clouds began to break up a little and we got glimpses of the glaciers of Mount Olympus behind Port Angeles as we motored by.

    Mountains behind Port Angeles


    Later, as we neared Neah Bay, the weather thickened and in the rain and the fog visibility ahead was down to less than a mile. We were sure of this because both AIS and radar (despite the clutter from the rain) showed a large cruise ship only a mile away but we couldn’t see it all until it passed us, when it revealed itself first by its bow wave, then the dark streak of its anti-fouling, then deck by deck as it sailed into somewhat clearer air.

    Motoring in the fog in the Strait of Juan de Fuca


    The fog was thickest right at the entrance to Neah Bay, where the radar was invaluable in confirming the entrance, along with the GPS/chartplotter. Once past the entrance, the fog opened up and we had good visibility right into the harbour behind the inner breakwater. Tied up and squared away, we made a late lunch/early supper of potato soup and salad. Listening to the forecast, it appeared that the weather would be OK the next day for getting out to the open ocean and making the big left turn to head for San Francisco.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Wonderful! Some of my fondest sailing memories involve sailing in the Straits on Oregon Offshore, Swiftsure and various deliveries. Looking forward to more!

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    I'm looking forward to more too.

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    And How!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    The next morning, the weather portents looked favourable, in that there were no major weather systems forecast for the next few days, so we got ready to depart, although we didn’t hurry as it was calm again so we would be motoring to start, at least. After last-minute topping up of freshwater and fuel, we headed out of the harbour and pointed the bow of La Vie En Rose towards the open ocean, a couple of miles away.

    The waters at the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, off Cape Flattery, are always confused because of the tides. In fact, the tides at Swiftsure Bank, at the centre of the entrance, never go slack but are circular, merely changing directions with flood and ebb. This morning was no exception. We motored into the swells, pitching, but not as severely as I expected. La Vie En Rose, with her slack bilges and longish keel, has an easy motion.

    Then came a very great revelation for me. I had resigned myself, as I always do when heading offshore, to not getting my sea legs for the first few days. In short, I am usually seasick for at least 3 days before I get over it. Dave had some anti-seasick pills that I had never tried before, called Stugeron. He and I both had taken some before we set out, and, miracle of miracles, even after several hours of pitching in the swells, I was not seasick, neither was Dave. I didn’t feel 100% and felt like it wouldn’t be a good idea to spend too much time below, but I even had an appetite for lunch, which was a good sign. This seemed like a miracle drug to me and is a definite game-changer. Rosemary didn't take them as she is one of those people who don’t get seasick.

    Tatoosh Island off Cape Flattery, seen from the north


    Tatoosh Island, receding from view behind us


    Still receding, last sight of land


    As we got a few miles out from the Cape, the swells became more regular although they weren’t any lower. We started to encounter great flotillas of birds that I think now were Sooty Shearwaters, although at the time I thought they might be Fulmars. There were hundreds, if not thousands of them and we saw them for hours.

    Sooty Shearwaters


    As the afternoon progressed, the haze and fog of the morning thinned out and the sky became lighter, almost sunny. The colour of the sea in the path of the sun was a silvery greeny gray.

    Silvery water to sunward


    Later in the afternoon, the wind came up enough over the starboard quarter that we set the genoa and the mizzen. There wasn’t quite enough apparent wind to keep the sails filled and the boat moving well so we motor-sailed with the engine throttled back. On the larger swells, the genny would backwind and fill again with a thump.
    In the late afternoon, we started our offshore watch rota, adopting a 3 hour on, 6 hour off rotation.

    The sun set in an orange ball


    I drew the 2100-2400 watch as my first watch. The wind had dropped again when I came on watch and the genny had been rolled up so we were motoring with just the mizzen up. Midway through my watch the wind puffed up a little so I unrolled the genoa and headed up to fill it, but after half an hour the wind dropped off again and I had to furl it. The whole watch, there was a great gaggle of fishing boats ahead, first off the port bow, then drawing abeam. They showed up on AIS but as their course was constantly changing, the CPA (closest point of approach) predictions were not reliable. The boats were lit up like a mall parking lot, to the point where I couldn’t see their navigation lights, either. I changed course offshore to stay well clear of them.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Nice. That is one beautiful boat.

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Probably the finest boat (that's too big to row) on this forum and any other forum.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Probably the finest boat (that's too big to row) on this forum and any other forum.
    I'm inclined to agree.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Lovely. Thank you Alex. I'm enjoying the read.

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Lots of people find Stugeron miraculous. I've occasionally seen it make people woozy and also give headaches.

    OTC in Canada and the UK. Prescription only in the US.

    Keep the story coming.

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Amazing that the smoke was even that far offshore! Love the story! Keep 'er coming!

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Thanks for posting rekindling some great memories.
    What make of dinghy is that on the foredeck?

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    I think Dave built a sweet Sweet Pea .

    Jan took this pic from my devil boat last year.

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    Default

    Dave did indeed build a lovely pea pod, featured in a Launchings column some time back. He figured it might not stand up to the kind of every day use and abuse of an extended offshore cruise, though. So he acquired a Portland Pudgy, that inimitable dinghy/lifeboat beloved of live aboards. He reports that it was just the ticket on their circumnavigation of Vancouver Island.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    I was about to say it was a Portland Pudgy but you beat me too it. I know Dave Hulbert, the Pudgys’ designer, and it’s a really well thought out boat.

    Great thread, thanks.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    I've seen a few of the Pudgys on cruising boats in the sunny caribee.
    Here is what I was thinking of..

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    When I came up to go on watch again in the morning, the sun wasn’t quite up, but as we looked, it rose in a pink layered ball, almost the colour of a Mary Kay Cadillac.

    Fuzzy picture of pink sunrise


    Shortly after eight, the wind started to rise from the north-northwest, and when Dave came on watch at nine, we set the genoa and the mizzen and set up the wind vane steering for the first time. It was a relief to shut off the engine. We found that with a boat speed of 5 knots, on this heading, we needed at least 11 knots of apparent wind over the quarter to keep the genoa filled, meaning a true following wind of at least 15 knots. We had that and more for most of the rest of the day, with the wind varying between 18-27 knots as the day and evening progressed. The wind vane held a better course than we could helming the boat. While the quartering seas would yaw the boat as it rose on a wave, the wind vane would correct as the wind direction changed and bring the boat back to her course.

    La Vie En Rose holding her course with the wind vane steering
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Again, I was impressed by the easy motion of the boat. Of course easy motion doesn’t mean no motion. The boat still rolled in the swells and waves but the sails steadied the motion and the hull didn’t plunge abruptly as it pitched, it was more like the hull eased down into the wave.

    Rolling in a quartering sea
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Same sea state, looking over the port side
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Now the deep sea life began to show itself. A small group of Pacific White-sided Dolphins showed up briefly.

    Dolphins (the auto-focus has trouble with the moving waves)


    We began to see Black-Footed Albatrosses, skimming over the wave tops and disappearing into the troughs behind, disdaining to flap their wings – such unseemly activity being consigned to lesser birds. A few Tufted Puffins fly past, low over the water, wings beating furiously, all heading north on a mission to somewhere.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Alex:

    Thanks for posting about the passage on the lovely LA VIE EN ROSE with Dave and Rosemary. The video clips reminded us of many wonderful days offshore aboard our Jespersen-built MAGIC. Delighted to know that that first leg is out of the way for them and when you are next in touch with Dave and Rosemary, please extend our greetings as well as an invitation, should they put into Morro Bay, to be in touch.

    Craig and Vicky Johnsen
    760-835-4204

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    The hazy sky mostly cleared by late afternoon, at least overhead. By evening the wind had strengthened to the point where we had to roll a couple of reefs in the genoa and even so we were consistently hitting 8 knots with just the mizzen and reefed genny. The sails are all by Carol Hasse and she built in some padding to the luff of the genoa so it sets well with a couple of rolls of reefing. Two such points are marked on the sail so it is easy to get a consistent reefed shape. The Hasse sails are beautifully made and they set with perfect shape. The more you look at them the more you appreciate the little details she builds in.

    We had been gybing downwind through the day, as the windvane didn’t like a direct downwind course. We did one last gybe to an offshore heading before dark. When I came on watch at midnight, the wind began to drop and I couldn’t keep the genoa filled on the heading we wanted. It would collapse and fill with a bang, making a helluva racket below for those trying to sleep off watch. I headed up enough to quiet the sails, figuring a decent sleep was worth a few miles out of our way. Later in the watch the wind picked back up again.
    The sky was clear overhead but hazy near the horizon. The Milky Way was visible, as was Mars, but below that nothing in the sky showed due to the haze. The bio-luminescence in the whitecaps and the wake made impressive flashes of light. My attempt to get a video of it produced only darkness on the camera, showing just how sensitive the human eye is to a wide range of light levels.

    Below, the boat is impressively quiet when the sails are filled. The solid construction meant that there was no sounds of creaking or groaning from any movement of the hull, deck structure or interior furniture with the working in the waves. Small sounds, like an unsecured jar in the galley locker, or something loose in the portside aft storage locker, clinking back and forth with every roll, became magnified. Now we adopted our various sleeping strategies, to cope with the rolling. My preferred strategy could best be described as the “tubeworm”, with my back braced between the port settee berth back and the inside of the berth cushion raised up and bolstered by spare clothing jammed between it and the lee cloth. I am wedged in tight and move with the boat, not independently of it, and am not thrown onto the sole on the quicker rolls. Rosemary has taken over the v-berth and has adopted the “starfish”, with limbs spread out to prevent any rolling back and forth. Dave has claimed the starboard pilot berth, which has just enough room for him to jam himself towards the back between the berth cushion and the deckbeams, the “barnacle” option. Regardless of strategy, we all become more comfortable as the week wears on and are less disturbed by the boat’s motion.

    An hour or so after I turned the watch over to Dave, the sails start slatting again and shortly after that I hear the motor start up. The wind has dropped right off and we are making no progress. When I get up in the morning, I feel great and am able to spend enough time below to make a proper fresh-ground coffee with the Aeropress. The wind continued to drop away to a flat calm and the sea state eventually followed it. We motored along all day in as calm a condition as have ever seen offshore, with the surface of the sea a long, oily swell.

    Motoring in calm sea


    It is calm and smooth enough that we are able to make clam chowder, from scratch, for lunch. It really hits the spot after a couple of days of snatched meals and snacks. Mid-afternoon, Dave checks the water supply and announces that we have enough water for a shower, if we want. It is unlikely to get any smoother and so we all shower, water-conserving style, wetting down, lathering up and rinsing off. What luxury, to have a shower in the middle of an offshore passage on a boat this size! At the end of the day, Dave says that we have only used 8 gallons of fresh water all day, including the showers and the cooking.

    Motoring in the Calm


    We motored all day in the surreal calm and through the night. The next morning, a light wind came up, enough to tempt us into raising the main and setting the drifter. The wind wasn’t really strong enough to keep either the main or the drifter filled as the boat pitched forward on the waves. The main didn’t make so much noise due to the battens but the drifter slatted a lot.

    Main sail


    We motor-sailed for a while before what wind there was dropped off again so the drifter came in and the main was furled on the boom and we were back to motoring in the resulting calm.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by MAGIC's Craig View Post
    Alex:

    Thanks for posting about the passage on the lovely LA VIE EN ROSE with Dave and Rosemary. The video clips reminded us of many wonderful days offshore aboard our Jespersen-built MAGIC. Delighted to know that that first leg is out of the way for them and when you are next in touch with Dave and Rosemary, please extend our greetings as well as an invitation, should they put into Morro Bay, to be in touch.

    Craig and Vicky Johnsen
    760-835-4204
    Will do
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    This is a great thread. Really enjoying it. Beautiful boat.
    thanks

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    I've never been attracted to offshore sailing but this thread is making me change my mind about that. Sounds like a wonderful trip!

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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Fog developed on Rosemary’s watch and it was thick when I relieved her. It was hard to tell just how bad the visibility was in the dark, but it was low. Now the AIS and the radar really came into their own. I checked the AIS every 15 minutes and turned the radar on as well, for a scan around, before turning it off again to conserve power. AIS has its limitations though. On my regular checks, I was not seeing anything of concern within 30 miles, when, between one 15 minute check and the next, a large freighter suddenly showed up on AIS only 12 miles away with a projected CPA of less than 1 mile. He also started to show up on radar so I altered course to give us at least 3 miles. Why he didn’t show up earlier is a mystery. No way he travelled 18 miles in 15 minutes. Perhaps his AIS had been turned off.

    Dawn was less about it getting lighter than the darkness getting less intense. It was very grey and thick. A little later in the morning, the wind came up so we were able to set the genoa along with the mizzen again and were able to shut the motor off. Although the wind wasn’t as strong as a couple of days before, we were doing 8 knots over the ground at times and we think we were getting a boost from the current.

    We were off the coast of California now, about 30 miles SW of Cape Mendocino. This little stray alighted on the starboard guardrail for a while. I thought it was a Black and White Warbler at the time, but on checking my bird books when I got home, I determined it to be a Black-Throated Gray Warbler, common on the coast. He must have gone astray on his migration south. I hoped he had enough strength to get back to land. Even if he were to have stayed, we would have nothing to feed it, as warblers are largely insect eaters.

    Black-Throated Gray Warbler


    We were able to sail through the day and into the night, although the wind dropped somewhat, to the point where it was once again hard to keep the sails filled on our preferred course.

    We must have been in the middle of a migrating bird highway, as on everyone’s watch that night, there were continual twitterings of birds about the boat and we could catch glimpses of them in the running lights. There wasn’t enough light to get a good look at them but they weren’t big and they sounded like land birds, not seabirds. As many night-migrating birds use the stars for navigation it could be that our lights were confusing them, at least for a while.

    The wind dropped towards morning and once again the genoa was taken in and we were back to motoring.
    In the morning, another bird took up residence for a while on the furled genoa sheet. I couldn’t really get a good look at him, but thought at the time perhaps he was a Fox Sparrow or a Song Sparrow, or maybe a Thrush of some kind. Looking at the picture again now I think maybe he is a Cowbird, but the picture isn’t really clear enough to get a positive identification.

    Bird on genoa sheet
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    The day continued calm and around mid-day a few whales showed up. Based on their size, their small dorsal fin, the indentation behind the head and the brief time they spent on the surface, I figured they were Minke whales.

    The day began to get a little brighter and the haze lifted enough that we were able to see the lower part of Point Reyes off our port bow and a little while later, the first of the Farallone Islands showed up to starboard. We began to see more shipping now, as the various vessels began to converge on San Francisco or we passed them outbound. There was still no wind so we were motoring.

    As we got closer to the circle that marks the convergence of the offshore traffic separation lanes, it looked like Piccadilly Circus on the chart and began to resemble it on the water too. There were various fishing charter boats, inbound from the Farallones, a Pilot Boat waiting for a big container ship coming up from the southwest and assorted other boats in the distance. Since we were motoring, we headed in to follow the inbound lane leading out of Piccadilly Circus that leads the 10 or so miles to the Golden Gate, This lane goes between shoals that lie to both the north and south.

    Sea lions took advantage of the buoys marking the channel to haul out and sun themselves.

    Sea lions on channel buoy



    We kept to the southern edge of the inbound lane, as the container ship was moving a lot faster than us and we anticipated he would overtake us before the bridge.

    Inbound (really big at close quarters) container ship


    At this point, it was mid-afternoon, and we were being boosted by the flood tide to the tune of at least 3 knots. While we still were experiencing very light wind, I suggested to Dave, based on my previous experience of sailing in the Bay, that the wind was likely be quite strong inside the Gate. We were all of us reluctant to take on a crossing of the Bay, when were tired at the end of a long day, in the likely blustery afternoon winds in search of a place to tie up or anchor. We didn’t have a destination inside the Bay yet, but we had cell coverage by now and Dave found a marina in Sausalito, just around the corner from the bridge, that had room for us. We decided to head there for the night and figure out a longer term solution the next day. We had been motor-sailing with the all sails up. We took in the genoa, then the main and the mizzen. It proved to be a good decision, as the wind began to pipe up as we drew under the bridge and the boat traffic began to increase. It was all a little overwhelming after a week of seeing only a few boats a day, and those mostly in the distance.

    Approaching Golden Gate Bridge


    Downtown SF


    Passing under the Golden Gate in a stiff breeze


    The wind stayed strong across the bay and it needed all hands on deck as lookouts to avoid the yachts out daysailing and pick out the navigation buoys and beacons that guided us into the narrow channel in Richardson Bay that led to the marinas of Sausalito.

    Finally, tied up safely at the marina, we had time to begin to celebrate our accomplishment.

    Salt-stained crew at the end of the journey


    And here is La Vie En Rose at rest at the dock, who carried us safely and comfortably 850 nm, and delivered us to one of the great harbours of the world.

    It was a great trip on a wonderful, sea-kindly vessel, with a great and companiable crew.

    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Excellent. That transition from a few days at sea to sailing in close quarters is quite the thing isn't it?

  32. #32
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    Sep 2008
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Excellent. That transition from a few days at sea to sailing in close quarters is quite the thing isn't it?
    It is, especially San Francisco Bay, which is so busy and crowded on Friday afternoon at the beginning of the weekend like this was.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    This was wonderful...thanks Alex...and or course Dave and Rosemary.

  34. #34
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    Sep 2002
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    On the river, Auckland, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Thank you for posting that, its not everyone who gets to sail in such a vessel, or on such a voyage. Thanks again for making it possible for us to imagine being along with you.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Default Re: Offshore Passage in a Gartside Yawl

    Thanks guys.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

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