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Thread: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    And some actual "woodworking"!

    This is a trial piece for the sliding door trim. The latch for this particular door is external to the slider frame. It screws to two holes in the frame, and has two wood screws that also go into the door framing. However, because the latch is on the outside of the door frame, the wood screws go into the trim, not the framing.

    To improve the strength of the latch mount, I fabbed up a test piece that is recessed on the back side so that the trim nestles up to the aluminum door frame, but is thick enough that the latch screws have something to grab onto. This one is mad of ash, which I had lying around the garage. The final will be painted poplar, and it will frame the entire door. To assure some strength, this piece fits directly to the door framing, and the drywall wall covering will sit in a small 1/4 inch deep rabbet on the outer edge.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  2. #107
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Wow, hard to believe that it has been 10+ months since my last post!


    Once the new windows were in, we focused on the interior. We had gutted the entire interior, removing all of the 40 year old insulation, paneling and acoustic tile ceilings.
    I re-did some of the wiring to place lamps, switches and outlets where we wanted them, and to set up power for the exterior mounted AC unit and the electric stove.


    Once that was done we replaced all of the wall insulation with newer, less crumbly, fiberglass bats. We decided to cover the walls with drywall. I know this is not really a marine solution, but, with the new roof, the boat is dry inside, and since she doesn't go anywhere, there is no risk of cracking. This has turned out to be a great decision, since the drywall and insulation together make the boat super comfortable summer and winter.
    Here is a pic of the galley with both drywall and hardie backer for the areas that will be tiled.





    And here is the head. The shower pan and curb are a product from KBRS called "hard core", since it has a foam structure will strategically places planks of PVC. The walls are Go-Board, a foam based waterproof panel. This all got sealed with a special sealer for the joints and screws.





    Turns out Susan's COVID super power is skimming drywall. So we went for smooth flat wall "texture", meaning we skimmed and sanded, and skimmed and sanded several times.


    Once the walls were done, we started on the galley cabinets. These were all Ikea units. I hate the silly plastic Ikea cabinet feet and cheesy toe kicks, so I built 2x4 platforms on the floor, with the proper setback, and then attached the cabinets to those. Here are some pics of that








    The refrigerator is a lovely unit made by Hier. A small very quiet French door fridge.. Love it.


    This phase took quite a long time, because there were many cabinets, and, because of supply chain issues and second thoughts, we needed up having to go all over the bay area to round up the specific components we needed. For a while our house was filled with unopened Ikea cabinet boxes. The result, however, was pretty pleasing:





    And, every morning we were greeted by sights like this. The sun rising behind the Sierra Nevada mountains. Yosemite is somewhere around where the utility pole is..


    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-27-2021 at 09:17 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  3. #108
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Looking good! Thanks for the update.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  4. #109
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    Westminster, Maryland
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Hello C,

    Quite a dramatic transformation evident in these latest photos when compared to the first photos!

    Obviously a tremendous amount of careful planning and then labor to make that transformation.

    Carry on!!

    Regards,
    Alan

  5. #110
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    So, once the cabinets were in, we needed to do the galley counter tops. We wanted something nice, but not too nice. So no laminates, and no stone. We settled on concrete, using these cool z-shaped ABS forms.




    These attach to a counter underlayment (I used Hardy board and ply to get the height right) using stainless screws. You then put in a fiberglass mesh, set up any holes (sink, faucet and stove), and pour. That was a crazy day. The pump pressure switch at the island failed, so we had no running water. I suggested we use river water, but Susan pointed out that we would have food on the counter, and maybe that wasn't such good idea. We ended up buying about 12 1 1/2 gallon bottles of Crystal Geyser water and using that!!

    The pour was nerve wracking, but we got it done. The company also sells a really fine stainless float that I used to get a very clean finish.

    Before:



    During:



    After, but before removing the forms, sanding, and sealing:



    And done. The forms have a weak line where they attach to the cabinet tops, so after you remove the duct tape from the corners, you pull out and down, and they snap off. leaving a clean face, and a lower return to cover the cabinet to counter joint.



    I decided to reward myself when I got home..

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-27-2021 at 09:20 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  6. #111
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    Bellingham, Wa, USA
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Counter tops looks great. I've considered doing concrete counters, but I didn't realize someone made a system for it. Could you share a link to the product you used?
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  7. #112
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Next up was installing the AC unit. I got a dual zone 18K BTU Bosch mini split that I mounted on the back deck. I had to run the line sets onthe outside of the walls, but nobody goes over on that side, and once they are painted to match the siding, they won't really show. This adventure started by mounting the indoor units and running the lines outside. I bought a really great multi size tube bender that has clever markings to account for the bend radius, so the line exits the bend where you need it to be. This, of course, involved cutting big holes in the walls. For the unit in the bedroom, I had to cut away the drywall on the other side (in the bathroom) so I could run the lines inside an interior wall (because of a large window, there is no room on the exterior wall of the bedroom)






    That's gonna need to be patched!!





    And here is the outdoor unit. This unit is so quiet you can barely hear it running. and it is super efficient.



    This was my first experience with an AC unit, and I learned a lot. It proved to be impossible to get anyone local to come all the way out to the island to purge the lines and pump down the system, so, after watching a bunch of Youtube videos, buying a pump and the various flare tools and attachments, I set forth.

    First I had to run lines from the indoor units to the outdoor unit.. That means bending and cutting them, and then flaring them at the unit fittings. All of that went fine. I definitely recommend using an eccentric flaring tool. they all came out perfect.

    Once I had the system charged, it started working! The only issue was, after about an hour, the living room unit wasn't very cold. I was afraid it had leaked. I went to check the bedroom unit, and it was so cold it was forming ice on the under side of the unit!!! WTF? It was a very hot day... maybe 102 outside.

    I finally realized that I had crossed up the control wires from the two units. So the thermostat in the bedroom was controlling the living room, and vice versa. Once I fixed that it was fine. It has worked flawlessly for the last 6 months, and is now used for heating.

    You may also notice that I have cut the deck away at the house. This was done in two passes. The first pass was to cut about 3 inches out from the house with my trusty worm drive circular saw. That was fun.. 40 feet on each side!
    I then cut the deck flush with the house siding using a Fein oscillating saw. That was really "fun". I was doing this in the middle of summer, and it took hours. I tried to work on the shady side of the boat, but ended up spending an awful lot of time in the hot sun slowly cutting the deck away from the house sides. The reason for this exercise was, as you may recall from earlier posts, the decks were made so they ran under the walls, and that had been the source of the rotted wall sill plates. By cutting the deck away, I was then able to put down galvanized flashing that sits flush to the siding and sits on the floor/deck joists sheltering the plywood flooring from any water. More on this in the next post.

    Cheers!
    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-27-2021 at 09:21 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  8. #113
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    I'm planning a little cruise up there between 12-20 nov...

  9. #114
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    When we redid the walls inside, we also deleted two small windows. These were onthe dock side of the house, and really were useless. Ruining privacy while also eating up valuable wall space. Originally they had held the two ancient window AC units. So when the walls were bare, I framed them in, and put plywood over them on the outside.

    In part to fill in the deleted windows, and in part to address the drainage issue at the walls, I decided to wrap the house in Tyvek, and put up a second layer of T111 OSB siding. As you may recall in the last post, I had cut a slot in the decks all the way around the houseboat, and set in a galvanized drip ell. I put the Tyvek over that, and then put the siding over both the Tyvek and the drip ell. This captured the drip strip between the old and new siding, and also filled in the deleted window holes.

    While I was at it, I re-worked the front returns. They had originally been slanted, giving the houseboat a sort of silly retro racy look. So I framed those in, and straightened them out.

    Here are various pics of this in process:








    These lamps were a find. They are LED based, but the diffuser is solid. This is great because we have all sorts of wasps and hornets on the island, and they love to nest inside lamps. When I was about to remove the old one (a sort of fake oil lamp with a vent on the top), I noticed hornets coming and going from the top. I doused it with a bunch of wasp spray and literally about 50 hornets dropped out of the lamp. Either climbing out the top, or dropping down from the bulb area that I had almost reached into to undo the lamp from the wall. Glad I didn't do that, or I'd have been running down the dock with 50 mad hornets chasing me!!

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-27-2021 at 09:24 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  10. #115
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Some of you may be wondering how I am going to deal with the gap between the deck and the wall. The answer is, I am not. I am going to us Cumaru or Garapa decking, and just let the water run through down onto the floats and into the lagoon. The galvanized flashing will keep the water away from the walls and the interior floors, and the floats are poly, so they don't care. Before I do that, however, I plan to extend the bow and aft decks a bit. I started with the aft end.

    Long before we started this project, there was a very windy day out at the island. Susan and I were sitting doing the NYT crossword over coffee as the wind blew. We suddenly heard some groaning and creaking. I remember Susan saying "The boat is coming apart!". I went outside and indeed, the wind had pulled off one of the moorings, basically ripping it out of the deck fascia and pulling apart the corner between the aft deck fascia and the side deck fascia. It was a mess. I jury rigged up another line to the other side of the boat, and sort of patched it back together, but it clearly had to be substantively rebuilt. It was a combination of bad design and rot.

    With the interior mostly done, I decided it was time to deal with the aft deck.

    To extend it, I got six 1 1/2 inch square 1/4 inch wall galvanized tubes. After drilling about 50 holes in them, pounded these in between the floats and the floor joists, lining them up with the 2x12 PT runners that hold the floats to the house. I then lagged them to the runners to secure them. They extend all the way under two joists under the house.

    All of the holes were to allow me to attach galvanized ell brackets that were then used to support 16 foot long PT 2x8 joists. This allowed me to cantilever the deck out an additional 2 feet. I was also able to then hide the new 95 gallon holding tank under the after deck, suspend by steel straps.

    Here are the tubes going in. This was a trick to get these in without falling into the water. Part of it was done from the deck, and part standing in a little fiberglass punt that we found under the houseboat (actually it blew out from under the houseboat in that same big wind storm!!.




    To fit these I had to cut the end of the rotted deck off (you can see it still attached in the photo above). This was challenging without also falling into the water. I managed to finally free it using my sawzall. It plopped into the water, and a I dragged it onto the dock and cut it up.



    Here is the finished result, with some temporary decking in place. You can see the holding tank suspended between the joists.



    And here is the final product except for paint. As I mentioned, the ply decking is temporary, and eventually I plan to extend the roof out to some posts at the corners of the deck. That extension will just be an arbor style frame, no roofing. But it will allow me to plumb in an outdoor shower at that end (a nice feature for a hot day, or for when you fall in while standup paddling!), and also to add a railing. I also replaced the back door with this nice three light unit. The color is called "Wild Blue Yonder".. I had it specially mixed in Hollandlac oil base by Fine Paints of Europe.



    Cheers!
    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-27-2021 at 09:29 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  11. #116
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    Counter tops looks great. I've considered doing concrete counters, but I didn't realize someone made a system for it. Could you share a link to the product you used?
    https://concretecountertopsolutions.com/

    I considered using that method but I poured mine in upside down forms a section at a time and polished them. Did the sink as well. Wasn’t sure my concrete finishing skills were good enough to do pour in place.
    8D5B1BFB-FD7D-4711-82B2-E24CC7EFE4B2.jpg
    Tom

  12. #117
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    So, with the walls all done, the heat/AC done, and the galley counters done (except for tiling), we decided to put in the floor. We had been living with pain and drywall compound stained ply sub floor for the last year. I put down a vape barrier first, and then a felt pad called "QuietFloor". We then put down a floating engineered floor made from cork.

    It was something of a PITA to get the parts to properly interlock, but the result is great. Clean quiet and understated.





    This floor is super nice to walk on. Between the pad and the floor it insulates much better, and it is dead quiet. It also looks nice!
    Susan also came up with the good idea of running a speaker wire under the flooring to get from the stereo in the left bookshelf, to the speaker in the right book shelf. I was originally gong to drill a hole and run it under the boat, but instead, simply placed a joint in the underlayment right across that spot, taped the wire down and put the floor over it. I then drilled a small hole inthe bookshelf, right against the 2x4 cabinet base and ran the wire up to the speaker. I cut a small slot inthe back side of the finish toe kick, and voila! Hidden wire and better sound.

    I started with some ELAC speakers, but they were too big for the bookshelves (bought them before I designed the shelves), an they didn't really sound very good (sort of flat and muffled). I recently traded these out for some B&W 607's. Spendy, but wow, what a difference. For a small speaker (11x8x8 or so) they really put out a lot of very clean sound!



    And finally to some wood butchering!!

    Many posts back you will recall that I made a temporary piece to secure the sliding door latch. It was finally time to address that properly.

    I got some 5/4 planed poplar, and worked out the somewhat complex profile. This needed to rest against the door frame, cover the framing and provide for a slight overlap of the wall board. So, after turning a large portion of these large boards into sawdust, this is what I had:





    This is just dry-fit. I need to paint it and then attach it. Cleans up the whole place!!

    I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the lovely Smith and Noble blinds in the living room, which are made with a partly transparent shade woven from some sort of grasses, and a blackout shade behind. They allow great control of the light, and also allow us to secure the place from prying eyes when we are not there.



    So next on my plate is to start thinking about fitting the interior ceiling trim (white wood beams across the ceiling at the joists to hide the staples showing the brick ply in place), doing baseboards, replacing the exterior soffits (currently some crappy perforated masonite), extending the front deck 4 feet using the same cantilever scheme as the aft deck, and building the fore and aft arbor roofs.
    I have decided NOT to do the exotic curved roof I was dreaming about inthe earlier posts on this thread. Just too much work.. Getting rid of the swoopy front roof will go a long way to classing up this old shanty boat.

    Cheers,

    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-27-2021 at 09:40 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  13. #118
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilkinson View Post
    https://concretecountertopsolutions.com/

    I considered using that method but I poured mine in upside down forms a section at a time and polished them. Did the sink as well. Wasn’t sure my concrete finishing skills were good enough to do pour in place.
    8D5B1BFB-FD7D-4711-82B2-E24CC7EFE4B2.jpg
    https://concretecountertopsolutions.com

    Nice job on those!

    I considered casting them outside and then mounting them, but we have a large corner ell, so it would have had to be pieced. I reinforced the thin spots (sink and stove) with rebar, but I still have a few hairline cracks. Adds character!
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-26-2021 at 11:29 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  14. #119
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    Counter tops looks great. I've considered doing concrete counters, but I didn't realize someone made a system for it. Could you share a link to the product you used?

    I posted the link above. Look for Wilkinson's post
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I'm planning a little cruise up there between 12-20 nov...
    I may be there painting trim. We are the last boat at the upper end of the harbor. Feel free to drop by!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  16. #121
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    At the risk of sounding really dumb, is it possible to do it like a boat deck or cabin top? That it, dynel or glass or what have you, and epoxy, coated with paint. Seems one of the elastomeric roof paints over sheathed sheathing would be slick, eh?

    I mean, it IS a boat, right?

    Or, does it have to have a house type roof?

    Peace,
    Full Of GREAT Ideas
    We ultimately did go with an EPDM membrane. Worked a charm. Zero leaks. Still flat though.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  17. #122
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    While I was sheltering in place last spring, I also set up a small consortium of Island members to install a broadband internet connection. This involved putting up a dish antenna that talks to a tower about 10 miles away in Lodi. I then had to program the big WiFi radio to broadcast signal to the docks. Took some doing, but it works well, and we all get 30 Mbps. As I suspected would happen, as soon as the other members saw the WiFi SSID, they all wanted to join the consortium. So the Board agreed to just pay for it and we made it a part of membership. The one down side is that now I am not the sole provider of streaming music, so we have to negotiate with other's taste in music. Bit that seems to work.

    Here is the dish going up (with a crop duster plane in the background - ahh the Delta).




    and here is the giant WiFi antenna, which is now mounted atop the dish pole (this was at a recent member party. You can see the big rotisserie made by one of tour Classic Yacht Association members on one of the BBQs. We recently used that to roast a pig. That was fun!).

    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  18. #123
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Got a bunch of the exterior and interior trim painted and installed this weekend...Using Hollandlac oil base from Fine Paints of Europe.
    This seemingly simple casing was actually fairly complex, because of the fairly complicated back side profile. Fit prtefectly.







    Missing some corner trim bits. Next time...



    Annnnd. My new boat. I read the article, and was searching for the plans, and discovered that it was for sale. I now have to ship it here from Port Townsend. Excited to have a lovely pulling boat for the Island. So, now I own TWO WB cover boats!!

    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

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