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Thread: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    *** Just a bit off-topic, Scott, but I lived in Southern California in 1968- 1972 and bought a copy of the Motor Vehicle Code book (was working on car modifications) The book was about as thick as "Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire" -- I guess it hasn't gotten any thinner.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    No possibility of being grandfathered in? I got lucky on a couple of old mobile homes I own. The county grandfathered me in, but they are in SC and not CA, which seems to make every aspect of living difficult for the non-rich.
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  3. #73
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
    No possibility of being grandfathered in? I got lucky on a couple of old mobile homes I own. The county grandfathered me in, but they are in SC and not CA, which seems to make every aspect of living difficult for the non-rich.

    Not likely. The issue is that they were never permitted because they were boats and didn't need permits. The county then converted them to "structures" under some new rules, but never told anyone that they needed permits (1978). I suppose we could sue the county for putting us into this bind, but I'm not sure that would result in much. At best we would end up having to meet 1978 permit requirements. While that might be easier, it would not solve the other water system issues (too many individual connections will put the water system into state governance.. yikes!!).

    I think the best avenue is to make the houseboat fit the DMV criteria for a vessel, and eliminate the county's jurisdiction.

    As noted above, the criteria is pretty simple. Needs to be "designed" to be self propelled (not doesn't have actually BE self propelled); needs to not have to rely ion a connection to shore for electricity (means batteries and shore power connection), and it needs to have a marine legal self contained sanitation system (composing toilet, holding tank, etc). As I understand it, if those criteria are met, then the DMV considers it a "vessel" and will gladly take our fees and give us registration stickers.

    S
    Now is a good time!


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  4. #74
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Will you have to pass a Coast Guard inspection in order to register it?

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Don't forget the pfd for all your house guests. And flares, running lights, a whistle or horn, etc. All the things that make a home a boat.

    Your approach probably makes the most sense in terms of stress and practice. You might want to consider delaying the pontoon mods until the vessel is registered as such. No sense spending the money and labor if some bureaucrat puts the brakes on the plan.

    Jeff

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Don't forget the pfd for all your house guests. And flares, running lights, a whistle or horn, etc. All the things that make a home a boat.

    Your approach probably makes the most sense in terms of stress and practice. You might want to consider delaying the pontoon mods until the vessel is registered as such. No sense spending the money and labor if some bureaucrat puts the brakes on the plan.

    Jeff
    You read my mind!!
    Now is a good time!


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  7. #77
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Will you have to pass a Coast Guard inspection in order to register it?
    Surprisingly, it doesn't;t appear so. That is probably only for commercial boats over some tonnage
    Now is a good time!


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  8. #78
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Just a slight swerve off-topic, California is the state where I had to buy a sticker for my Fiat 850 Spyder to indicate I didn't need to buy a smog-emission-compliance sticker (847 CC engine was smog exempt due to being smaller than 850 CC )

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Update on the shanty boat.

    I did mange to get the DMV to register it. That was really easy! So, I now have CF numbers and stickers. A couple of the other houseboat owners are planning to go the USCG documentation route. Not sure how easy or hard that maybe.

    We did find a bureaucratic issue with he county, however. After we wrote them to define what modifications we felt would suffice to convert the "floating home" to a house boat (Vessel), they said they did not have the authority to tell us what criteria would need to be met. In the next sentence they then said that once we converted it, they would inspect it, and tell us if they felt it was no longer a floating home. Hmmm.. So, you can't tell me what the criteria is, but you will tell me if I don't meet it?

    So, we decided to cut the Gordian knot, so to speak, by removing the boat from the county altogether. That should clear the red tag. Since it will be disconnected from shore services, and is registered as a boat, I can tow it to another marina and finalize the modifications there. When it comes back, it will be a new boat, with CF numbers, and substantial modifications.

    While it is out, I plan to do a major refit as described above. First we will gut the galley and bathroom. I tis easier to do that at the boat yard than to haul that stuff away at the island.

    Second, we will remedy the warped deck. Not sure how yet, but the boat shop will have ideas on that, I am sure.

    I am going to have them replace the windows, and, of course, do the "vessel mods". I found a nice small outboard (Yamaha 9.9 long shaft bigfoot motor) on Craigslist, so I am going to use that as the propulsion. It will probably move the boat at about 1 knot, but all it has to do is move it..

    The big project will be the roof. After a lot of consideration, I decided to actually raise the walls in the living room before putting on the curved roof. I also worked out how to make the roof so that the interior ceiling is curved.

    So here is the basic idea:


    The flat section of roof to the right of the raised section is above the galley and head. That will be a place for propane and two AC units.
    The front deck will be extended about 3 feet to create the larger covered porch area.

    Here is a detail of the roof structure. I have exaggerated the curve here. In reality, it will have about 1 foot of rise over 8 1/2 feet of width (the roof is about 17 feet wide overall), so that's easily adequate to shed water. It's a good thing too, since with the heavy rains we had in CA this year, the flat roof has been leaking.



    I figure we can build up the side walls, and then install the curved ceiling ribs. over that goes the whitewashed oak ply to create the ceiling, and then over that goes the curved rafters.
    Seems to me the greatest work here will be making all the rafters. I think I may use steamed oak for the interior ribs instead of laminating them.

    We should be towing the boat over to the boat yard next month, and it will probably be there over the winter.

    Cheers,
    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 05-16-2019 at 10:03 AM.
    Now is a good time!


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  10. #80
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    NICE! Make sure you leave a ventilation air gap between your insulation and the OSB supporting the corrugated roofing. I erred on that on part of the roof in my old house, allowed the insulation to contact the roofing substrate and had to replace it in a few years as it went soft.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    And, here is the rafter and framing design.



    Now is a good time!


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  12. #82
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    NICE! Make sure you leave a ventilation air gap between your insulation and the OSB supporting the corrugated roofing. I erred on that on part of the roof in my old house, allowed the insulation to contact the roofing substrate and had to replace it in a few years as it went soft.
    Hmm, good to know! What went soft the OSB or the insulation?
    Now is a good time!


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  13. #83
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    That's going to be a umm nice mobile home.
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  14. #84
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Hmm, good to know! What went soft the OSB or the insulation?
    It was plywood substrate and it soaked up enough moisture to rot frighteningly quickly! Looking later at codes Oregon requires a 2" minimum air gap between insulation and substrate, with roof and soffit vents sufficient to allow air flow.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    It was plywood substrate and it soaked up enough moisture to rot frighteningly quickly! Looking later at codes Oregon requires a 2" minimum air gap between insulation and substrate, with roof and soffit vents sufficient to allow air flow.
    OK. I guess I'll be re-designing that eave then!!
    Now is a good time!


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  16. #86
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
    That's going to be a umm nice mobile home.

    The term is Shanty BOAT!!!!! These are not the floating homes you are looking for!
    Now is a good time!


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  17. #87
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    ... a floating house from 1966 needs to comply with 2019 Title 24 codes.. Sheesh!
    Probably a result of the Sausalito houseboat wars of the seventies ...

    You know, if you want to go crazy, you could build a mini-tug to tow yourself around with. It'd look cute tied to the front porch

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    The term is Shanty BOAT!!!!! These are not the floating homes you are looking for!


    I was having flash backs of the movie "Water World".
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  19. #89
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    I think the new version of the shanty boat will look great with Makoto shepherding it along. And I like the whole sticking it to the county with style thing.
    -Jim

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  20. #90
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Well folks, finally getting around to an update.

    We managed to convince the county to accept our modifications, and release the red tags (took 9 months of discussions with them). Added a motor mount, holding tank, shore power connection, etc...

    A few weeks ago Susan and I rented a 20 yard dumpster and demoed the interior of the houseboat.

    Took a couple of days to remove the furniture (it came "furnished"), horrid formica kitchen cabinets, several built in cabinets in the bedroom, carpets, etc. HUGE pile of junk.

    Here is what we ended up with.





    As noted earlier the original boats has ply pontoons. These were removed about 10 years ago, and replaced with 4x8 poly floats. The floats sit on 2x8 stringers (flat), which are tied to the joists that make up the deck frame. The deck frame has a ply top (the floor and decks of the boat), and a fiberglasses ply bottom. The bottom only goes out to where the pontoons were attached, so there is a small (2") gap between the floats and the bottom and another gap between the sides of the deck and the outsides of the floats. I plan to close all that up..

    We also found several hatches buried under the carpets. Apparently the original design had access to the inside of the pontoons through these hatches (holding tank, water heater, etc were located there).

    The real find, however, was rot. Lots of it. The boat was originally made with ply decks that were fiberglassed. The ran the glass part way up the side walls (2-3 inches) and then put the siding over that. This was probably fine for a few years, but 45 years later, the glass has cracked at the wall-deck seam, and water has intruded. As far as I can tell, this is mostly on the weather side of the boat.

    This has rotted the ply decking and the wall sill plate, and s bit of the tops of two floor joists. Unlike a normal boat, this houseboat is built more like a house, but without the proper flashings and things.



    I used my Fein tool and cut out the floor and sill plate in the affected area (ended up being about 6 feet of sill plate). I am relying on the ply siding to hold the wall together while I do this. Here's the result of a few quality hours with the tool, cutting rodded wood back to good wood, cutting nails, and removing the sill. Sort of like surgery!!






    I will be cutting out the tops of the two joists today, and fitting in new wood there along with adding sisters to strengthen them. Then I'll put in a new sill plate (all of the new wood will be pressure treated). I have one other area up front that is just as bad as this. Once that's done I am going to put in a secondary sub floor to even out the surface for a floating cork floor.

    You can see in the background, I also put in some new coper plumbing for a new supply line and a tankless water heater. This replaced a horrible cacophony of old CPVC piping, and a small electric water heater that had seen much better days. When I drained that the water came out cloudy and smelling of rotten eggs, probably a reaction to the manganese from the well water...So, good riddance to that...

    Lots of work ahead..
    Now is a good time!


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  21. #91
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Nice! What was your final design for that roofline? Going with the cambered roof you were showing earlier? We're doing a similar wall treatment to a historic building at a local youth camp...it was built in the late '30s and deferred maintenance has caught up with it.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Nice! What was your final design for that roofline? Going with the cambered roof you were showing earlier? We're doing a similar wall treatment to a historic building at a local youth camp...it was built in the late '30s and deferred maintenance has caught up with it.
    Yeah, Still planning the cambered roof, but not with the raise section. Just too much work.

    Gotta redo all the decks first..

    Got the joists repaired and new floor in. Had to notch the sill plate because after 40 years of rot, the wall has settled about 1/4". Could not get the plate in without cutting 1/4" reliefs for the studs. That took, like 2 hours..Sheesh..

    S
    Now is a good time!


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  23. #93
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Good point on the membrane. I Also looked at metal, which would be very cool. I have a metal roof on my house and love it. The guy that did mine gave me a rough quote of $25K for a curved aluminum roof on the boat. Ouch!

    I was going to add some foam insulation layers in the added crown.
    I converted a flat roof to a curved one on a house, 11 meter lengths of corrugated metal roofing. It more or less relaxed into a natural curve that I just tweaked a bit. A surprising amount of space allowed for much more insulation.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    I converted a flat roof to a curved one on a house, 11 meter lengths of corrugated metal roofing. It more or less relaxed into a natural curve that I just tweaked a bit. A surprising amount of space allowed for much more insulation.
    How steep was the bend? Mine is about 18 feet wide (so about 5.4 meters). How much rise do you think I can get without having the panels custom curved?
    Now is a good time!


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  25. #95
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    So, I got the rot under the sink area fixed. Cut out the top of the rotted joist, put in a new piece and then sistered on a new section of joist. Here's the pre closure surgery...(I also replaced that rotten 2x4 blocking)



    Putting the sill plate in was a biatch. I suspect after 45 years of slowly rotting sill, the wall had shifted slightly down. It is not noticeable, but trying to get the sill in with the hydro-tek ply under it on the joists was almost impossible. I ended up cutting 1/4 inch slots in the sill and hammered it in place with my trusty Mjölnir (Thor's hammer). It isn't going anywhere!. The pic is a dry fit without fasteners.



    And here is next weekend's project. Super rotted.. The really dark area between the hinge and the sill is not wood, it is space.. Sill-gone...This is going to be a partay!!!





    And just because she is so pretty in the morning light. here's our home while we are working on the houseboat...




    Cheers,

    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 03-08-2020 at 10:35 PM.
    Now is a good time!


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  26. #96
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    This should be fun. Seems as though you pretty much have a blank canvas - though you should make sure to keep any lime green shag carpet

    Ha ha! When we tore up the built in "dresser" in the bedroom (WTF needs a DRESSER, on a houseboat in the delta?) the 45 year old carpet under it was a multi colored brown, gold, and tangerine shag.. OH YEAH, BABYYYYY!!!!
    Now is a good time!


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  27. #97
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    So the rot project continues!

    Susan and I decided we could shelter in place as effectively at the Island as at home, so we packed up the car and spent a couple of days doing houseboat work.

    When I last posted, I noted a corner where there was some extensive rot. That was my target on this trip. Susan meanwhile demoed the bathroom, and took down all of the horrid old acoustic tile ceiling (we confirmed it was cellulose and not asbestos).

    Here is the rotted corner. Those are the floats below us, and the baby hyacinth in the water.. In this pic I have already removed the rotten sill plate below the outlet. The sill was GONE (OK, it was sitting as a rotted pile on top of the float) over between the corner and the first stud. Used my trusty Sawzall to cut the nails holding the studs to the sill. You can also see a bit of the rotted plywood deck under the first stud. Note, This is after I vacuumed up the horrible spidery mess that was below the floor board...



    Interesting find. Here is a corner brace with a bolt holding the house sill to the structure below. Note that the lower bolt is sticking up about 3/8 inch..This was because the plywood between the sill and the joists had rotted, and the weight of the house had squashed the rotten ply, effectively lowering the house walls and roof by 3/8- 1/2 inch!

    You can also see that the end of the other sill is also well rotted...



    My solution to this settling was to attach some braces to the outside of the house, and place hydraulic bottle jacks underthem, located over the joists. I then literally jacked up the house about an inch...This allowed me to clear out the rotted floor/deck ply and install sisters on the joists under the sills.

    If you look closely, you can see how far the deck has separated from the bottom of the house.[/FONT][/COLOR]



    This is a test fit, to see that I can get new subfloor and a new sill under the studs. Note the bolt in the corner is now no longer sticking up..

    [I replaced all of that blocking with new PT wood.



    Here is the new floor in place with new sill plates! I had rebuilt the joists under the left sill (which runs in the same direction as the sill, and the one directly below the outlet (which runs at a right angled to that sill). Susan was inside when I lowered the jacks. She was pleased to see everything settle right into place!

    The cross block you see between the joists was my trick to press the joist sister into plane with the floor. I took one of the bottle jacks and put it on top of the joist pressing up against that block. I got it into place, but it nearly broke the block in two!

    I am going to have to replace the floor panel in the pic below the new floor panel too (requires removing, and replacing, the sliding door... Next trip...

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 03-31-2020 at 11:42 PM.
    Now is a good time!


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  28. #98
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Seems your site is offline & therefore no pics?

    Sounds like great progress though!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    I got the pics...looks great!

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    I see 'em now too.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    OK folks, so the pandemic and a very busy summer at work slowed progress on the shanty boat a bit. Mostly it slowed my posting about the shanty boat.

    We managed to get the county to buy off on the conversion to a "boat", and release the red tags on all of the converted boats. Whew!!

    Susan and I removed all of the rest of the old masonite paneling, all of the horrible acoustic tile ceiling.



    I completed the re-plumbing project, including putting in a holding tank and Raritan Atlantes marine toilet, and redid most of the electrical wiring. There were numerous bad electrical things lurking in the walls (poorly done hidden splices, etc. I went to replace an old funky circuit breaker and found that that type of breaker had been discontinued about 10 years ago because they had a tendency to catch fire! Yikes! So I had an electrician friend replace the entire breaker box.

    Here is what I found when I took the kitchen window surround off in preparation for changing out the window:



    Not only had some joker routed wiring inside the framing, I am not sure what transpired with the sill and the "supporting" joists!!! That has all been fixed now.

    We replaced the horrible old un-insulated aluminum single pane windows and sliding door with beautiful double pane low-e glass Milgard units. Here is a shot of the new slider sitting on it's re-built threshold framing (the entire threshold and supporting framing was rotted and had to be replaced and re-flashed). The new door glides open and closed. Feels like a high end car..

    Rebuilt threshold before the door went in (notice the huge array of bags with the old acoustic tile ceiling debris on the deck)


    New slider...


    New 4'x8' Milgard window (there are two of these. man was that a PITA to install while balancing on the narrow deck!!)


    We re-insulated the ceiling (hard to do front the bottom!!), and then put up pre-finished birch ply attached to the joists. My plan is to fab poplar ribs about 2 1/2 inches by 1 3/4 inches painted white to cover the seams and the fasteners.

    We re-insulated the walls (the old insulation basically turned to dusty hues of fiberglass when you touched it), re-configured the bedroom closet so we can make a small study desk area instead (we really don't store a lot of stuff on the houseboat, so two bedroom closest was excessive).

    And we are now finishing the walls. We decided to try using drywall. The houseboat is on poly floats, so it stays dry, and the masonite paneling always looked cheap. We'll see how this works out. All the drywall is in, and the taping /finishing is about 50% done. Who would have guessed that Susan is a whiz at skim coating drywall?

    More later
    Now is a good time!


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  32. #102
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    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    To drive to the "island" (which is more of a spit of land than an actual island) you normally drive through Tower Park Marina (10 miles west of Lodi, off Highway 12), and out along a levee. The county has been re-building the levee at tower park, so we have been using a dirt road through a farm that has a ramp up to the levee.

    We had planned a weekend at the houseboat this past weekend. We rented a box truck and took the new refrigerator and new bed over (they were shipped to our house because the houseboat has no meaningful address). It had rained the night before, and there is a low spot on the farm road just before the levee ramp. When I crossed that in the truck, the entire truck started to slide sideways in the mud. I managed to control it, but it was a little dicey.

    We unloaded the fridge and bed and load the truck with the old fridge, two very old window AC units, the refrigerator cardboard making, and some last remnants of the old paneling to take to the dump. We were a bit concerned about the muddy spot, so we though it might be better to take the Tower Park levee... it was not.

    The "island" part of the levee was fine (it is packed gravel and dirt), but as soon as we got onto the new raised levee at Tower Park, we found it was also pretty muddy. Susan was in her Kia Niro EV ahead of me as we slithered along the road, water/marina on one side and a steep drop to the tower park campground on the other. Pretty disconcerting, especially in a large box truck!

    We finally came to a spot where a car had been abandoned in the mud. I stopped, but Susan forged on and, of course came to a stop in the deep mud near the abandoned car. After some exploration, we found a ramp off the levee to the original road. We managed to extricate Susan's car by putting the big cardboard sheets from the refrigerator under her front wheels. WE did that three times until she was back into the slippery, but not as deep section. She then backed up 50 yards and took the ramp to the road. Whew! Crisis averted. I then backed up the truck very carefully on the slippery mud, and eased down the ramp. It wasn't actually level, and I could feel the truck sliding sideways on the mud as I went down the ramp. Fortunately, I reached the bottom before sliding off the edge!! Another crisis averted...

    The photo below doesn't do it justice. Both Susan's car and the truck had about 2 inches of mud caked on the insides of the wheel wells. You can see that she was in pretty deep!



    Next time we go, we're going by boat!

    Cheers


    S
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 12-15-2020 at 06:07 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    41,935

    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Great improvements, but bummer on the mud!

    Make sure you carefully hose out the wheels, calipers, rotors, axles, etc. on the car. You may need to pull the wheels off to really get everything. Mud & gravel jammed in there can become expensive very quickly! DAMHIKT...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,619

    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Great improvements, but bummer on the mud!

    Make sure you carefully hose out the wheels, calipers, rotors, axles, etc. on the car. You may need to pull the wheels off to really get everything. Mud & gravel jammed in there can become expensive very quickly! DAMHIKT...
    Good point. I'll check that. Thanks
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,619

    Default Re: Delta Shanty Boat Transformation

    The major rot issues seem to now be resolved (there were four areas that had to be repaired). The issue was that the ply decking went under the wall sill plates. the decks were fiberglassed, but that was 50 years ago. Once the fiberglass leaked, water would enter the ply and start delaminating and rotting it. As I noted in a post above the solution was to lag some 2x4s to the exterior at the wall joists, and use bottle jacks to raise the sill off the decking. Clean out the old decking with a Fein tool, cut any nails with the Fein too, and then slide a new piece of marine ply under the sill, and screw it all into place. In several cases I had to cut rot out of the underlying joist and sister in a joist support.

    Here are few pics of that process. All that decking I sawed away on the outside will be removed and replaced with longitudinal deck boards that will drain through.

    Inside floor panel removed, house sill raised up, and rotted decking under sill cut out.



    My house raising mechanism, and a view of the deck cut away from the house. It ultimately required another jack located at the next floor joist to raise the wall enough to get the new floor panel in under the sill.



    Floor panels replaced and house walls lowered back onto structure, and everything buttoned up.



    We decided to delete the two smaller dock side windows. One was in the galley, where we wanted the refrigerator to go, and the other was in the bedroom. Both had noisy creaky old window AC units and both had the shades drawn all the time for privacy. They were more a haven for spider webs than anything else.

    My plan is to remove the remaining ply decking around the outside, install flashing around the outside of the house at the base of the wall, wrap the exterior with Tyvek and put new siding directly over the old siding, sandwiching the flashing between the old siding and the new siding. For decking, I think I am going to use Trex so water will drain through and over the floats and not pool next to the house making for more rot. Trex is easier to maintain in the delta sun than any type of wood.

    I pulled the aged noisy AC units out, removed the windows and framed in the walls. The AC units will be replaced by a dual zone mini split that will live on the back deck. I also put in a propane powered tankless water heater. The island uses well water. Whenever we tried to use hot water it smelled awful. When I removed the old tank water heater, I had to drain it. Out came a load of hazy rotten egg smelling crystals. So, not doing that again..

    Near term goal is to finish the interior walls and put in the new cork floor. hopefully by Christmas, weather permitting. After that, it's galley cabinets.

    One nice aspect of going down to the wall studs is that wiring was easy! I pulled an 8 Ga 4 wire Romex cable from the new breaker box up into the ceiling, and down the kitchen wall for the AC unit power. Took all of about 10 minutes!

    Here is a pic of the island from the water as we approached aboard MAKOTO.

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 12-15-2020 at 06:42 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

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