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Thread: A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

  1. #1
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    Default A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    The first new treatment in 60 years for a particularly stubborn kind of malaria is raising hopes that it might help eradicate the disease, even though the treatment can cause a dangerous side effect.

    Called tafenoquine, the drug targets the parasite that causes relapsing malaria. Plasmodium vivax infects an estimated 8.5 million people, mainly in Asia and Latin America. Each time infected people have a malaria relapse, the parasite returns to their bloodstream, allowing them to transmit the infection if a mosquito bites them again. Tafenoquine was approved as a treatment in July by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is under consideration as a preventative medication, too.

    “This is a game changer because we’ve really been struggling with eliminating [P.] vivax,” says malaria physician Ric Price from the Menzies School of Health Research in Darwin, Australia.

    The FDA’s action is expected to spur other countries where relapsing malaria is more prevalent to approve the drug as well. Companies are also working to develop speedy, low-cost tests that can identify people with a genetic deficiency who may risk getting a kind of anemia from the new drug. This test is essential for putting the drug to use in rural areas where rates of both P. vivax and this deficiency can be high.

    A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria (LINK)
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    Hope the voyage is a long one.
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    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    Research on Malaria drugs has supposedly suffered because in the retail market there wasn't a great deal of money to be made. I always found this odd considering how widespread the complaint is. A fungus makes mosquitos more likely to spread Malaria,
    https://www.futurity.org/fungus-mala...oes-1258512-2/
    and another developed fungus may be the answer to that but so far of limited effect.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4318179/
    and
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/g...in-mosquitoes/

    But some populations of Mosquitos have become immune to other insecticide treatments

  3. #3
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    Default Re: A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    That could save a lot of lives. Particularly if it is a single dose treatment. A lot of the problem with malaria treatment and the development of resistant strains is to do with failure to take a full course.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    Malaria, another one of those fun things the jungle gives you. Besides ringworm and disentery.
    "para todo mal, mezcal, y para todo bien también" (for everything bad, mezcal, and for everything good, as well.)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    I've had it, an extremely unpleasant disease.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  6. #6
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    Default Re: A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    Just half heard on local radio about a program to breed mozzies treated with some sort of bacteria which makes the mozzies immune to zika and dengue. Breed, release, they cross breed with the local population and wipe out the diseases.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Just half heard on local radio about a program to breed mozzies treated with some sort of bacteria which makes the mozzies immune to zika and dengue. Breed, release, they cross breed with the local population and wipe out the diseases.
    An Australian City Says They've Wiped Out a Dangerous Mosquito-Borne Disease, With No Environmental Impact (LINK)

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  8. #8
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    Default

    Bingo


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