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Thread: a cub on a clothesline

  1. #1
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    Default a cub on a clothesline

    brodie-rig.jpg this is a piper cub flying off LST776. the ship carried up to seven aircraft and was succesfully deployed at the invasion of Iwo Jima. There were other LST's fitted with flight decks for these little spotter aircraft but they had to land on the beaches after launching where with the Brodie rig the plane could land on the wire again. Brave men indeed.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    It's a Stinson. ID by the large triangular tail. I believe they called it the L-5. I once met a Tuskegee Airman who flew one. He had an L-5 with him, though he may not have been the owner.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    And I thought we did some crazy ****.

    The best statement I've seen from this latest carnage came from a student who lived through it -

    "My generation will not allow this to continue!"

    Remember voting age is 18. Read it and weep reds.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    A Stinson like that is one hell of a lot more capable aircraft than a J-3 Cub by Piper. 6-cyl engine, for one thing; leading-edge slots integral with the wings for another. Postwar civilian version is either the Stinson Station Wagon or the Voyager. They make a nice Seaplane.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    To "land" that thing the pilot swoops in under the crane at the slowest possible speed and engages a steel ring above the midpoint of his wing with a hook on the crane. That first swing out forward has some g's. associated with it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    Quote Originally Posted by John of Phoenix View Post
    And I thought we did some crazy ****.

    JoP, somewhere in my Vietnam pictures I have one of a CH-53 (?) with a Huey on a sling underneath it - Did that happen often ?



    Rick

  7. #7
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    To "land" that thing the pilot swoops in under the crane at the slowest possible speed and engages a steel ring above the midpoint of his wing with a hook on the crane. That first swing out forward has some g's. associated with it.
    there's gotta be a better way
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    Take off might've been even more interesting. Two thoughts come to mind. First, they might just spin that derrick until the L-5 reached take-off speed, then disengaged the hook to let it fly off tangentially. Or, they might just drop it and see if those wing slots would generate some lift before the plane hit the water. An old timer once told me those slots could make a pilot feel like he'd really accomplished something in the way of a gusty crosswind landing, when it was really the Stinson that was doing all the work. Dad always liked Stinsons.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    A front-line carrier vessel today can generate a 40-MPH wind over the flight deck while her aircraft are standing still. The ship shown in the OP might do what? 15-knots?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    there's gotta be a better way
    Nosce te ipsum

  11. #11
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    not better

    Nosce te ipsum

  12. #12
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    The Curtis King Fisher on Battle Ships used a single center float with a small pair under the wingtips.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    The Curtis King Fisher on Battle Ships used a single center float with a small pair under the wingtips.


    Nosce te ipsum

  14. #14
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    Default Re: a cub on a clothesline

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    JoP, somewhere in my Vietnam pictures I have one of a CH-53 (?) with a Huey on a sling underneath it - Did that happen often ?



    Rick
    That's a CH-54 Tarhe. This one, modified to deliver a 10,000 pound "Daisy Cutter", is jokingly referred to as a BH-54. Recovery of downed aircraft was one of their primary mission. As to slinging out a Huey... she wouldn't break a single bead of sweat. Max load was 20,000 pounds. Max gross weight of a Huey or Cobra is 9,500. Typical recovery of a shot up bird was below half that.

    The CH-53 is the famous rescue helicopter, the "Jolly Green Giant", callsign "Jolly xx". We covered them on a couple of missions. Damn fast for the monsters they are.
    The best statement I've seen from this latest carnage came from a student who lived through it -

    "My generation will not allow this to continue!"

    Remember voting age is 18. Read it and weep reds.

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