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Thread: SCM L'invincible F3A rebuild

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    459

    Default SCM L'invincible F3A rebuild

    Thought I would document my rebuild of this machine here as there is scant info on these beastly machines around the web. They are also coming up at auction for about what you would pay for some pot tin garbage machine from you know where. They are Italian made from the 70's.

    One point of order: This will not be a Jim Ledger caliber thread - I lack the style and grace completely.

    I should point out the only other resource I have found on this machine here: https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....(lots-of-pics)

    This one lived in a furniture shop near Toronto and came complete with a mortising head on the other side of the machine.



    It was had for about a grand shipped to my door.

    The only issue are the eccentric bushings that control the parallel table adjusts. If you look closely you can see the missing one on the left side and the botched one on the right side. More on this next.

    SCM no longer supports this model, and no spare parts are available. I would have run for the hills, but I already have one of these machines... and well - its a Ferrari of a machine.

    It also weighs 290 Kilos or 640 pounds, so tearing it down is a bit like fighting a gorilla.

    Up next, bushing removal.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    459

    Default Re: SCM L'invincible F3A rebuild

    Here is a photo of a functioning bushing in the other F3A:



    After the small nut is spun and the pin removed from bushing (not removed in photo), they are adjusted with a gentle tap from a punch. These are so well fit that if lubricated properly the bushing can be pulled by finger pressure if the table shaft is removed:



    This adjusts the parallelogram of the tables - a simple but effective setup.

    Here is a pic of the bushing removed and locking pin removed:



    Sadly the adjustment method was lost along the way, and this is how the bushings ended up looking when I took possession of the machine:



    As apparent a number of small to radical interventions on the adjustment face have been attempted... it also came with this homemade tool which illustrates the failed approach:




    So concludes the forensics on the damage to the bushings - next up the included bad machining attempt to make new bushings that came with the machine.
    Last edited by Alex Low; 07-31-2018 at 09:56 PM.

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