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Thread: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

  1. #1
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    Default Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    I just acquired a 1991 vintage Cosine Wherry. I had always wanted to build one, and even had the plans and a set of forms, but I had a chance to buy a pretty nice one and did. The boat is in generally good shape though it could use some sanding and varnish this winter. It has two great sets of 8' spruce spoon blade oars that are delight to use. I'm used to high quality canoe paddles, and these are every bit as good.

    The evening after I got it, I rowed it 5.5 miles on the Tualatin river, just to get a feel for how it handled. My only negative comment is the lack of foot braces. As a white water canoeist, I'm used to being really connected to the boat, and I found I missed having foot braces. Problem is that I really don't want to fasten anything to the inside of the hull at this point. Each seat/thwart, has a vertical brace from the seat to the keel, if I do some sort of dock board they have to split down the middle. I'm looking for sort of a minimilist solution, because I'm more interested in rowing than working on the boat at this time of the year.

    I thought I would share one clever thing the previous owner did. Each of the oar locks has a 2-3 inch piece of 12 gage solid copper wire attached to the eye in the bottom of the shaft. He would thread an electrical connector (wire nut) on to the wire, to make sure the oar locks could not lift out accidentally. Since the Cosine Wherry has 3 rowing stations for two oarsmen, it is important to be able to move the oarlocks around, and still have them secure. A toggle might look more nautical, but the wire nuts were really clean, cheap and secure.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Needing foot rests on my Hv13, I looked through old threads here. An idea I liked is to use a boat fender that is tied to the thwart or wherever convenient. The placement can vary by the length of line used. It functions quite well.

    Sorry, I don't recall who originally made the suggestion.

    Jeff

  3. #3
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    Southeast MA, USA
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    I have seen people use a broomstick about the width of the boat with a tennis ball for padding on each end. The stick is tied to the seat supports and adjusted to the proper length.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Quote Originally Posted by Schooner36 View Post
    I have seen people use a broomstick about the width of the boat with a tennis ball for padding on each end. The stick is tied to the seat supports and adjusted to the proper length.
    That might work. The vertical brace under the seat may get in my way, since it goes from the thwart to the keel, and is about where I want my feet. As long as my feet are in front of the thwart, it would work fine. It would be easy to run a line from the thwart or gunnel down to the brace.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    IMG_2010.jpg
    This is what one looked like in the Adirondack 90 mile race

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    I want to pursue the foot rest issue some more. We have had the Cosine Wherry in the water 12 or so times, and we have quite a few miles on it. I have pretty long legs, so my feet would normally be under the thwart in front of me. My wife, not so much. Our wherry has a solid support the from the center of the thwarts to the keel. As a result I will need foot braces on either side of the support, not just one for both feet. because of that, I can't use an adaptation of the dowel with tennis balls.I know our current rowing experience that I want them to be quite solid, but I'm not sure whether they need to catch the ball of my foot, or just my heel. I'm sure the ball of the foot would be better, but it may take up quite a bit of room in the boat that I don't want to give up. I store all four oars in the bottom of the boat when it is in storage, so I want to keep the area pretty open. I'm sort of thinking about kayak foot braces mounted on either side, high enough that they could catch the ball of the foot, kind of like they do in a kayak. I would really rather have them in wood, but I'm trying to come up with a design that would be simple and not take up too much space. I really want to add as little as possible to inside of the boat, but I do want it to row well.

    Could you folks who row small fixed seat boats let me know what works the best for you.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Quote Originally Posted by Ski-Patroller View Post
    I want to pursue the foot rest issue some more. We have had the Cosine Wherry in the water 12 or so times, and we have quite a few miles on it. I have pretty long legs, so my feet would normally be under the thwart in front of me. My wife, not so much. Our wherry has a solid support the from the center of the thwarts to the keel. As a result I will need foot braces on either side of the support, not just one for both feet. because of that, I can't use an adaptation of the dowel with tennis balls.I know our current rowing experience that I want them to be quite solid, but I'm not sure whether they need to catch the ball of my foot, or just my heel. I'm sure the ball of the foot would be better, but it may take up quite a bit of room in the boat that I don't want to give up. I store all four oars in the bottom of the boat when it is in storage, so I want to keep the area pretty open. I'm sort of thinking about kayak foot braces mounted on either side, high enough that they could catch the ball of the foot, kind of like they do in a kayak. I would really rather have them in wood, but I'm trying to come up with a design that would be simple and not take up too much space. I really want to add as little as possible to inside of the boat, but I do want it to row well.

    Could you folks who row small fixed seat boats let me know what works the best for you.
    Foot rests catch the heel or instep, not the ball of the foot. Fit two, one for you one for the missis. Your legs will go over the short one, even if the backs of the calves rest on it it should not be a problem
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Here's my foot brace for the center thwart on my Cosine. I decided to go with the traditional design. It works quite well, and I find myself moving the adjustable bar on long rows.

    From this FB album - https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1&l=fe1e69ad7d



    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Ideally your foot rest will support the whole foot, but that is hard to engineer. Unless you have floorboards to which you can mount stuff, you'll need to do some kind of slot or tooth system mounted to the sides. If you go the kayak brace route you can mount one set of tracks to the bottom on each side of the stantion then use that as a the base for your footrest. Steve Kaulbeck did this neatly with his Adirondack boats. I don't remember the configuration precisely. The brace itself may have had a heel rest to keep your heel out of the track.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    The problem on my Wherry is that the seats (Thwarts) have a full width (front to back) support that goes from the seat to the keel. My feet would typically be just under the seat astern of me, so I need tracks for the foot braces on both sides of the support. Mine has all three rowing positions so we can row single or tandem so I can't use Thorne's solution directly. Perhaps putting a track on either side of the seat support, and a a second on the hull further out.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Quote Originally Posted by Ski-Patroller View Post
    The problem on my Wherry is that the seats (Thwarts) have a full width (front to back) support that goes from the seat to the keel. My feet would typically be just under the seat astern of me, so I need tracks for the foot braces on both sides of the support. Mine has all three rowing positions so we can row single or tandem so I can't use Thorne's solution directly. Perhaps putting a track on either side of the seat support, and a a second on the hull further out.
    You could always replace the seat support, which is overkill, with a simple pillar.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    You could always replace the seat support, which is overkill, with a simple pillar.
    I considered that, and it would look nicer, but it is quite a bit of work. There are knee braces from the gunnel to the top of the seats, with all of the screw holes nicely plugged and finished. I suppose I could cut the seat support out without removing the seat, but it would not be that easy.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    David
    Do you find yourself wishing that the stretchers were big enough to put the ball of your foot on, or do you think that is that not necessary?

    FWIW, I ditched the wire nuts in favor of wood toggle and cord for the oarlocks. After damn near capsizing the boat by catching the bottom of my shorts on an oar lock while getting in in shallow water, I decided I wanted to be able to remove the oarlocks easily without worrying about dropping them overboard. It also makes it easy to move them from one rowing station to another.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    Here's my foot brace for the center thwart on my Cosine. I decided to go with the traditional design. It works quite well, and I find myself moving the adjustable bar on long rows.

    From this FB album - https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1&l=fe1e69ad7d




  14. #14
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    Default Re: Cosine Wherry Foot Rests, Oar lock retainers

    Quote Originally Posted by Ski-Patroller View Post
    David
    Do you find yourself wishing that the stretchers were big enough to put the ball of your foot on, or do you think that is that not necessary?
    You only need to rest our heel and/or instep against it. One solution for boats with bottom boards is to cut "D" shaped holes for your heels.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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