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Thread: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

  1. #1
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    Default Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Ok Guys, so here’s where I’m at:

    I’ve recently picked up (for free) a 70ish year old Jubilee class 18’ carvel planked (splined) centreboard hull that has been sitting in a shed untouched for 27 years (the same age as me). The grand plan is to restore / rebuild the hull into something akin to a Francois Vivier open sailboat With something like a gaff, gunter or balanced lug rig.

    The problem is that after reading numerous threads about restoring/ rebuilding and dry sailing carvel hulls I don’t know if my dream can become a reality. Unfortunately, where I live in Australia, a private berth or mooring is impossible due to costs, distance and availability. Keeping her as a trailer sailer/ dry sailer to be used a few times a month for day trips or the occasional week long cruising adventure is the only possible option.

    About the boat:
    She’s 18’ overall, 16’ at the waterline, a beam of 6’8” and a draught of 1’ 4”. Fully loaded racing weight was about 950 kg ballasted, the ballast/ centreboard has been removed so I am thinking she weighs about 700 kg. I think she is made out of NZ kauri

    Her Condition:
    The ribs are not in great shape, towards the stern almost every rib is in some way damaged, some are broken altogether. However there are lots of steel ‘straps’ (I’m not sure of their correct term) fastened to the planks in these areas. I can’t find any information about this type of repair or if it is valid. I’m also not sure if these are copper or bronze. As you head towards the bow the ribs get progressively better with the ones under the foredeck being in pretty good shape by the looks of it. The fastenings are not great either, I’d say about 30% are missing their roves or starting to come loose on the old ribs. The metal ‘straps’ have good fastenings. Somehow the planks seem pretty tight and rigid in most of the areas, maybe due to the metal ‘straps’ or splining? There are some areas where if I put my full weight on my foot the planks will move a tiny bit. She has been splined at some point with timber that is softer than the planks. But there are still some cracks that I can see daylight through between the planks. The plywood decking is, I think, too far gone but I’m planning to open her up anyway.

    I went down the sheathing rabbit hole on a number of threads here and elsewhere as well as the WEST system repair guide and the Gougean Brothers book and have decided it’s probably not the best option? If I’m going to spend thousands of dollars and lots of time I would really like something that is guaranteed to last a while. I’m still open to the idea though so please correct me if I’m wrong. Seeing as she will be an open boat that has been splined and will not spend much time in the water at all and not for long periods of time does this make her a better candidate for sheathing?

    If I rebuild her the more traditional way, replacing or repairing the broken or damaged ribs and refastening where necessary will that mean that I would also have to make new splines? If I go to this effort will they just continuously crack and reopen all the time whilst she sits dry?

    As a last ditch effort before I hopefully re-gift her to someone more willing or sadly dismantle her I have one more idea: I just quickly caulk the gaps between the splines and the planks with something soft and easily applied (I’m thinking something that comes in a tube) then slowly immerse her in water on the trailer at a very quiet boat ramp for a while and just see what happens. Might she not leak too much and take up enough to fill the gaps stopping major leaks and stiffening the structure to be usable in this condition for light duties without having to renew the splines? Would I then be able to keep using her is this way, using her immediately after lowering her into the water from the trailer? I may just need to touch her up with this easily applied caulking every now and then when she dries and opens? This might Inspire me to slowly rebuild and strengthen her whilst using her lightly in the local river with a small outboard until she is strong enough for more serious duties.

    Thanks

    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Welcome to the forum.
    I don't think that those straps are steel, there is no red rust in evidence. It is an unconventional repair, but they are not doing any harm.

    I would repair the broken timbers, but not as she was originally built.

    I would cut out the timbers running down to the keel and replace them with solid floors, then fit new timbers across the top from side to side.
    Drill limber holes through the bottom of the new floors for drainage.
    She is a pretty hull.
    As to the splines, lay some old carpet in her when the work is finished and soak it with water. She will swell up and close the cracks. Then ppaint her.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Oh my.....

    I do believe a carvel hull is a very poor choice for a trailer sailer...

    I think a plywood boat would be much better for a trailer sailer.

    But having said that, and bearing in mind that I have no direct experience at this, I'd start by sanding the hull down to the wood on the outside.
    See what the planks look like, and see what the fasteners look like. It may be wise to pull and replace many of the fasteners. Hopefully the planks are OK.

    Of course, you need good ribs to fasten into! I don't think steaming and bending into place a few ribs would be a big problem, probably be fun.
    I don't know of an easy way to sand the interior though! That looks like plenty of work there.


    Eh, I'd not try to swell her up on the trailer. I'd use a pile of old towels and a garden hose. DON'T fill the hull with a hose! She isn't strong enough!
    Just soak the towels and and interior. repeat as needed, let her swell gently. Dry 27 years!

    But I certainly would not "use her as is." You'd wind up swimming home!

    It may well be wise to re-gift that 'ol gal, and fast!


    I'm sure plenty of more experienced folk will chime in here soon.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Welcome to the forum Ruey, looks like a lovely shaped hull that you have there.

    I’m not sure why you’d dismiss sheathing her - especially if she’s Kauri pine (NZ or Queensland) and has been splined and is nice and dry anyway. She seems a prime candidate for sheathing given that she’ll be living on a trailer out of the water wherever she is.

    The straps look like they could be galvanised steel and if she’s been kept out of the water there’s no real reason to see rust stains.

    If what’s left of the deck is ply why not rip the deck off, fit some bracing to hold the shape as you go and clean it up properly inside and out back to bare timber and see what you’re actually looking at?

    Replace the broken frames, refasten her where needed, add some floors as Nick suggests, repair, replace or insert splines where needed, replace any dodgy planks, sheath her and enjoy her.

    If you do it properly the sheathed hull will last long after you have finished with her.

    She could also be Huon Pine or Celery Top pine but cleaning her up will give you a better idea.
    Larks

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Thanks a lot guys, I really appreciate it.

    I really like the idea of inserting solid floors and fitting timber across the top, I was a bit worried about fitting new ribs into that curve!

    I will defiantly go with the wet towel/ carpet idea instead using the trailer haha.

    Ok I guess the first job is to start stripping her back to wood and making a better decision from there. I think the planking is pretty good. If one has a longitudinal crack, can that be repaired or must the whole plank be replaced? I found found one plank that is broken and a few that are cracked lengthways. I'll upload a picture.

    As for sheathing, I'm still not sure.

    Sorry when I said steel straps I meant metal straps. I think they are copper, brass or bronze? Lots of green where the paint has come off. See photo.

    Luckily my friend has a father who is a very experienced shipwright and is happy to take a look and advise. I hope I will be able to decide whether or not to take it on, and if so, which method to use.
    12.jpg14.jpg15.jpg

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Some more photos:

    8.jpg1.jpg7.jpg6.jpg

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    If you do decide to sheath her, keep her under cover and dry her right out. Where the planks and splines are sound, clean out the seams and fill with thickened epoxy which will stiffen her up and make her stronger. Some folk run a circular saw along the seams, but a saw blade in a Multi-Tool will be less aggressive. Where you have to replace bad wood, glue the new splines in.

    If you don't sheath her then you can wet her down to take up.
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 10-09-2020 at 05:14 AM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Very sweet shaped hull...!

    Those ribs towards her stern are very acute, not surprised they broke at the apex of the bend, also not surprised the extra ones put in were metal. She is a lot of work, but a great project and will be fun. Good luck.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!


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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Very sweet shaped hull...!

    Those ribs towards her stern are very acute, not surprised they broke at the apex of the bend, also not surprised the extra ones put in were metal. . . .
    When you replace the ribs, allow them to run straight without the sharp curve at the floor. Add widespan floors (wood) on both sides of each replacement straight rib. This will prevent the acute/sharp curve that caused the rib breakage, and doubling the floors up prevents a local bending moment and creates a desirable double shear. The more gentle curve higher up on the rib should be fine, because the radius of curvature is much larger and because the loads transferred are not as large as they are at the rib-to-floor joints.

    Thanks for the photos on this wonderful project.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Thanks xkdrolt,

    That sounds like a good idea, so will I place solid timbers down to the keel and lay the new ribs along the top from side to side, as nick suggested earlier? Then add extra widespan floors on each side of these new straight ribs?

    Thanks!

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Wow, nice work wizbang!

    In regards to sheathing:

    Going down a completely different path, would it be a possibility to fix the broken ribs with thickened epoxy as best I could then run an epoxy fillet down both sides of every rib to serve the dual purpose of strengthening the hull and re-fastening the planks to the ribs? I totally understand if this is a bad idea and would not work, but I thought I would put it out to you guys. This is actually the idea that the guy who gave me the hull had. I understand that timber ribs would be cheaper, but the thickened epoxy might be a lot easier if it saves re-fastening?

    I would then do as nick said earlier: "keep her under cover and dry her right out. Where the planks and splines are sound, clean out the seams and fill with thickened epoxy which will stiffen her up and make her stronger. Some folk run a circular saw along the seams, but a saw blade in a Multi-Tool will be less aggressive. Where you have to replace bad wood, glue the new splines in."

    Then coat the outside with epoxy/ cloth and the inside with epoxy.

    I really like the idea of solid floors down to the keel, but I wonder if it would trap too much moisture/ be hard to seal with epoxy if I went down this path..?

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    After glassing te outside I would just rip out the ribs, grind the fasteners flush and sheath the inside with 600g/sqm biax. Two bulkheads and a few glassed over ply floors and it's a new boat.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruey View Post

    Going down a completely different path, would it be a possibility to fix the broken ribs with thickened epoxy as best I could
    Np.you would be sticking expensive epoxy to degraded probably rotten frame timber. It is easy to do it properly by cutting the sound timber back from the break at an 8 to 1 gradient so that you can scarf a new section in, gluing and through fastening. By fitting floors where the short broken section was you can run the new middle bit from side to side on top of the floor.
    I would then do as nick said earlier: "keep her under cover and dry her right out. Where the planks and splines are sound, clean out the seams and fill with thickened epoxy which will stiffen her up and make her stronger. Some folk run a circular saw along the seams, but a saw blade in a Multi-Tool will be less aggressive. Where you have to replace bad wood, glue the new splines in."

    Then coat the outside with epoxy/ cloth and the inside with epoxy.
    No, epoxy is not a paint, it is glue and laminating resin. Either lay up cloth in epoxy or use a good paint system.

    I really like the idea of solid floors down to the keel, but I wonder if it would trap too much moisture/ be hard to seal with epoxy if I went down this path?
    My post mentioned limbers through the new floors to allow bilge water to drain.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruey View Post
    In regards to sheathing:

    Going down a completely different path, would it be a possibility to fix the broken ribs with thickened epoxy as best I could then run an epoxy fillet down both sides of every rib to serve the dual purpose of strengthening the hull and re-fastening the planks to the ribs? I totally understand if this is a bad idea and would not work, but I thought I would put it out to you guys. This is actually the idea that the guy who gave me the hull had. I understand that timber ribs would be cheaper, but the thickened epoxy might be a lot easier if it saves re-fastening?
    You should be aware that epoxy alone isn’t structural, it needs the glass reinforcement to provide the structural integrity so epoxy fillets along a seam alone wouldn’t provide any strength to the hull. And as Nick says, you need to get rid of any dodgy timber before glassing.

    As I said earlier - until you clean it out properly and strip away all of the paint you don’t really know what you’re dealing with so why not do that before making any further plans or decisions on which way to go?
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  16. #16
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Ok thanks guys, really glad I started this thread, it looks like you you will be saving me a lot of time, money and effort in not making the wrong decisions!

    I guess I might as well start stripping some paint. I'm assuming it will be lead, I just went down and got some gas vapour filters for my face mask.

    Any tips? Heat gun too dangerous? Even outside in a bit of a breeze? The guy at the hardware suggested a stripping system called 'peel away', apparently you apply this stripper then put a layer of thin plastic over the area with tape (air tight) and leave it for 72 hours. Then you remove the plastic and all the paint basically comes with it. After this, he said, you have to treat it with acid. Sounds great in theory as it is very safe because the vapours are contained and the labour is reduced dramatically. Its very expensive though. I'm trying to do this on the cheap.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    I use a "polisher". It is exactly like a "sander" or a "grinder" , but for the speed.
    A polisher turns between one and 1500 rpm. very slow. it has a 5/8 inch spindle, thus, it can take many sizes and types of discs.
    soft and hard back.
    3 inches dia. to 9 in. dia.
    12 grit to 220 grit.
    kind of a handy kit.

    i have other sanders...RO.'s , ocillating corner jobbies...but the disc polisher is the workhorse of wood boatbuilders.

    blowers too...fans and blowers. if you have the luxury of some space...blow the dust the hell away ...

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Heat gun and scrapers to get the bulk of it away before finishing off with the discs as Bruce suggests. Be aware though that you need to be careful with the discs so that you don’t gouge holes in your hull, once you get the feel of them you can get a decent finish.
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  19. #19
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    I pretty much never use heat or scrapers or "removers". just sanders.
    They take up a bulk of time, not off a bulk of material.
    When you purchase a polisher, It usually comes with a junky 6 inch soft pad and a rubber backer made to take a wooly bonnet for ....polishing.They cannot do a good job sanding.
    All the pads and backers above are aftermarket, bought seperately. The 3M 8 inch pads are 30-50 bux a pop. "Spiral Cool" hardbackers are about the same. Cheap Home Depot sandpaper is false economy...they waste time.
    But if you really wanna step things up..Festool Rotex.
    Last edited by wizbang 13; 10-10-2020 at 06:22 AM.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    First I usually will strip as much finish as possible on such a job such as this. Often there are hidden problems that come to light and having a good step by step plan starts with the paint removal. I do like using scrapers that are shapped to fit the curve of the work and so I have a lot of them both card and hooked. I keep them sharp for just such a job as yours. Depending on the area heat from a small butane torch will soften most paint. Remover gets down into the cracks and wire brushes need to be used with care. All in all, get as much of that old paint off as you can. A multi tool can help as well. And so can sanders but they are dangerous as an electric sander can often remove more material than necessary and in the wrong place leaving an unfair surface that is often an eyesore. It is a big and nasty job but in the end you will have a better boat.
    Jay

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Wiz, you da man for getting stuff done, in the shortest time.

    For the OP, he could probably build a Vivier boat in glued lap ply or strip in the time it would take to renovate this wizened prune, But it is a nice hull.
    Me, I would go the sheathing route, or maybe laminate veneers on the outside. Both would work for trailer sailing esp in his climate.
    Local friend built a Wisstocks design. 6mm strip/ 2x veneers/glass. To say the hull is bullit proof is understatement. 18 yrs of trailer sailing and no probs. The trailer, a bit less so, I just replaced the axle/suspension for the second time.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Glassing + epoxy inside & out to provide membrane stiffness would allow you to remove all the ribs, like a foam core design w/o foam but at the esthetic cost of losing the character of the original build. I'm not a fan in an older boat.

    Nick did mention limber holes, and that's a standard practice. The unbent ribs technique, if it can be called that, where they mate with the floors is something I learned from reading an Ed McClave article, and IIRC he "learned" it from N.G. Herreshoff: don't use really sharp steam bends beyond some rule-of-thumb where the bend radius and the rib thickness are related by a 15:1 or 20:1 ratio --- something like that. So the sharp rib bend at the floor is sidestepped for alternative means to transfer the load from ribs to floors. Double floors on each side of the rib creates double-shear for the fasteners and avoids unbalanced bending. You could use thinner stock floors, but if you have the room for it I'd use them at std thickness. None of this is my idea --- but I read it, it sounded right from a mech engineering viewpoint, and I remembered.

    If you use abrasives and power tools on the paint, wear appropriate breathing protection. Especially around lead paint.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    One does not need breathing protection with burning paint,scraper dust or chemical scrapers?
    I recon, if one can work in the wind,(electric blowers and fans), sanding is the safest way to strip a boat.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by xkdrolt View Post
    Nick did mention limber holes, and that's a standard practice. The unbent ribs technique, if it can be called that, where they mate with the floors is something I learned from reading an Ed McClave article, and IIRC he "learned" it from N.G. Herreshoff: don't use really sharp steam bends beyond some rule-of-thumb where the bend radius and the rib thickness are related by a 15:1 or 20:1 ratio --- something like that. So the sharp rib bend at the floor is sidestepped for alternative means to transfer the load from ribs to floors. Double floors on each side of the rib creates double-shear for the fasteners and avoids unbalanced bending. You could use thinner stock floors, but if you have the room for it I'd use them at std thickness. None of this is my idea --- but I read it, it sounded right from a mech engineering viewpoint, and I remembered.
    You are suggesting drilling for fastenings parallel to the plank surface through that skinny rib? With a dirt pocket the width of the timber between a pair of floors?

    I am suggesting putting a new length of steamed timber on top of a floor that has no arms, scarfed into the sound parts of the old ribs, and fastened through the plank reusing the old fastening holes and also fastened vertically down into the top of the new floor. The planks below the tuck will be fastened into the sides of the new floor reusing the old steamed timber nail holes.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    You are suggesting drilling for fastenings parallel to the plank surface through that skinny rib? With a dirt pocket the width of the timber between a pair of floors?

    I am suggesting putting a new length of steamed timber on top of a floor that has no arms, scarfed into the sound parts of the old ribs, and fastened through the plank reusing the old fastening holes and also fastened vertically down into the top of the new floor. The planks below the tuck will be fastened into the sides of the new floor reusing the old steamed timber nail holes.
    Hi Nick, is this what you mean?

    One question I did have was: how would the new floors need to be secured? Do they need to be bolted to the keel, or is that a bit excessive? Could they just be secured by being fastened to the planks and ribs and maybe some nails into the keel?

    Thanks

    16.jpg

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Regarding paint removal:

    Thanks all, I will give those ideas a try and look out for one of those polishing sanders second-hand, In the mean time I'll get a nice disc for the grinder.

    I gave it a test run with the heat gun / scraper today- the paint was coming off really easily but the fumes were really bad.. If I do anymore of this it will be on a really windy day or with some fans/ blowers as wiz suggested. Or maybe just not at all.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Speaking from experience on both methods: - a heat gun and scraper can be a peaceful, therapeutic (once you get in the groove), effective and satisfying experience. It needs a heat gun, a good scraper and a decent mask;

    - the grinder and sanding discs are a dusty, noisy, messy, effective and satisfying experience. It needs the grinder, multiple discs, preferably head to toe covering (cheap Tyvec suit), goggles and a decent mask.

    Either way the effect of stripping the hull to bare wood is satisfying, it really just depends on what sort of experience you want and whether you want to buy a grinder and discs.

    I gave up on the various chemical strippers as expensive, messy, ineffective and simply unpleasant to deal with.
    Larks

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  28. #28
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruey View Post
    Hi Nick, is this what you mean?

    One question I did have was: how would the new floors need to be secured? Do they need to be bolted to the keel, or is that a bit excessive? Could they just be secured by being fastened to the planks and ribs and maybe some nails into the keel?

    Thanks

    16.jpg
    Yes, exactly like that.
    The timbers that are being replaced are probably not attached to the keel, unless they are fitted into pockets. Unfortunately there is little room for both bolts and limbers unless the limber is against the plank. The original floors will have been bolted, but those can be replaced like with like if needed.

    P.S. Scandinavian and Shetland boats do not have any of the floors attached to the keel.
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 10-11-2020 at 06:42 AM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Take a look at a video on Off Center Harbor by Eric Blake sheathing a lobster boat CHARLENA from May 13 of this year. It may give you some ideas, if not encouragement (its a MUCH bigger project than you're working).

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    Paso Robles, CA USA
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    32

    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    I have a boat somewhat similar to yours - it is a Winer Malone built Bahama Dingy (14'). It is "needy" and has some worm damage to the stem and forward ends of the garboard planks. Otherwise ribs are very sold as is the planking. It is remarkably dry (we live in a very dry climate) and is NOT a great boat for trailer sailing (which it will be). So I think I'll end up sheathing her. I'm building a pram right now, but she might be next to worked. Here's a link to some pics. Also any thoughts on restoration of the boat are warmly welcomed!

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/XUA6CFA4bFnFbrwG7

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    51,011

    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by PasoRoblesSailor View Post
    I have a boat somewhat similar to yours - it is a Winer Malone built Bahama Dingy (14'). It is "needy" and has some worm damage to the stem and forward ends of the garboard planks. Otherwise ribs are very sold as is the planking. It is remarkably dry (we live in a very dry climate) and is NOT a great boat for trailer sailing (which it will be). So I think I'll end up sheathing her. I'm building a pram right now, but she might be next to worked. Here's a link to some pics. Also any thoughts on restoration of the boat are warmly welcomed!

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/XUA6CFA4bFnFbrwG7
    Yours will be easier to work on as it does not have that hollow tuck in the stern. What sort of worm damage?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  32. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
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    14,462

    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Keep in mind that this is a small boat, a dinghy! Larger boats need floors and frames that attached, often at every other frame.
    Here only a few floors are needed and only those few need keel attachment on every third frame. Remember that this is a light and flexible hull!
    Too much solid attachment to the keel stands the chance of throwing the entire structure out of synch. so tread lightly my friend! Stay with the floor spacing you have already! Just renew those that have seen their service and have finally failed.

    Herreshoff would have said that the boat does not need bilge stringers either because they are too close to the center of gyration. In the past I have re-framed many six meters and Rhodes 33's all of which had bilge stringers that landed on cracked frames. I think Herreshoff knew what he was talking about!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 10-11-2020 at 12:20 PM.

  33. #33
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    Oct 2008
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    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post

    Herreshoff would have said that the boat does not need bilge stringers either because they are too close to the center of gyration. In the past I have re-framed many six meters and Rhodes 33's all of which had bilge stringers that landed on cracked frames. I think Herreshoff knew what he was talking about!
    Jay
    Are those bilge stringers or margin strips for securing the bottom boards?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  34. #34
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    Nov 2004
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    Port Townsend WA
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Good question Nick. The sure look like bilge stringers to me! They are right at the turn of the bilge just at the beginning of the dead rise down to the keel which is a place that many lightly framed boats end up with broken frames just under the bilge stringer where they lurk hidden from sight! On this boat I would guess that the floorboards rest directly on the floors themselves as the dead rise aft is darn near flat.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 10-11-2020 at 02:25 PM.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    Default Re: Rebuilding a Carvel Hull - Please Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Good question Nick. The sure look like bilge stringers to me! They are right at the turn of the bilge just at the beginning of the dead rise down to the keel which is a place that many lightly framed boats end up with broken frames just under the bilge stringer where they lurk hidden from sight! On this boat I would guess that the floorboards rest directly on the floors themselves as the dead rise aft is darn near flat.
    Jay
    Not enough info really. They do not extend into the bow as stingers would, They run under the stern deck, as bottom boards would if that deck was not original The bottom boards that I was thinking of do not rest on the margin battens, they hook under them and rest on the timbers and floors.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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