Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567 LastLast
Results 176 to 210 of 233

Thread: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

  1. #176
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Port Stephens
    Posts
    19,386

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Looks great! Keeping it smooth around fittings just makes it a bit easier to keep clean. I don't think it really looks any better on a traditional boat.

    Rick

  2. #177
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Oh and what colour is that? It's about what I want.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    Thanks Garret, Bruce, Phil, and Rick!

    That’s cream, straight out of the tin, Phil.

    I thought it it would be less yellow, and I was pretty much decided to add some white to the next coats, but it looks so good I am changing my mind. Also, I wanted that traditional colour and I realised I really don’t know what that is. 😄. International Paints should know, however. It does seem to set off the timber nicely.

    I didn’t mask off to make the “panel” look. Laziness, lack of time, recognising my skill level, whatever, but afterwards that too seemed a good decision because thinking about it, it seems it’s really not traditional, it’s a feature of fibreglass boats. Am I right?

    Regards,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  3. #178
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    19,246

    Default

    Excellent

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Phil Y; 06-03-2019 at 07:51 PM.

  4. #179
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    I’m still not convinced about the deck colour, so if anybody knows what the traditional “canvas” look would be, please chime in. The way I see it, this International cream is very warm and rich, but it’s also really quite yellow. It’s the yellow that I find a bit loud or something.

    in the meantime, I had removed the mid ships cleats, but realised that they really are necessary. But the blocks they were mounted on could use a refresh!

    So before work this morning I quickly chopped out some new ones.

    Old:

    B5EC5B54-C0B2-40DD-A0B8-F3F9C85A78DF.jpg

    Jarrah, weathered and splitting.

    1C9C4857-2353-4AA0-B8D8-3C5D2121B2DD.jpg

    A nice chunk of teak.

    569CCE4F-20B5-44FD-B519-3A342E96DB69.jpg

    Perfect templating tool...

    BCA8087C-5997-4346-A1BC-22901AAD067B.jpg
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  5. #180
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Roughed out on the bandsaw.

    433923CE-2907-427B-A84D-EBD10BE62591.jpg

    And after work, sanded. Happy with that.

    5C23BF69-34AF-4E67-8798-7147BB1BBE62.jpg

    I wish every job was as easy and as satisfying!

    Regards,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  6. #181
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    OK, while the weather’s lousy I thought I would try and work out how to make a pair of name boards for the transom. When launched she had a pair, and I presume half the name was on each.

    B68E4369-8576-4730-A556-8A5AC328B8F4.jpg

    I’m thinking jarrah (a reddish mahogany), carved letters, gold leaf glued into them, Awlwood varnish over the top.

    Here’s what I have done tonight, having no idea how to approach the problem.

    First, a font.

    04FE9CEF-8D11-4C25-957A-2995D34B4EEC.jpg

    Laid this on a piece of scrap pine, and traced the outlines of the letters with pen, making an impression in the pine. Not sure if this will work on jarrah. Then shaded those lines with pencil so I could see them. Finally, used pen again to highlight the lines.

    40C20C2C-E9C4-47D1-9E8C-F81525D5289C.jpg

    Next, the trim router with a 6mm rounded bit, set so it only just peeks out.

    57BBAC17-4898-4C15-A2FB-51BF5E264B1C.jpg

    Done freehand, and hard to get the lines straight. But I reckon it’s enough to give some hope.

    DBC09B49-A847-4837-9FB1-450E4F980B23.jpg

    So, questions. Is there a right or at least better way to do this without specialised tools? I don’t mind buying router bits, but not interested in an electric carving unit. Do I need to “V” the cut outs, or will a flat floor look OK? Would the entire process be easy and better if I just use chisels? OK, I can work that out by trying the next letter that way. I also thought to try cutting each line with a chisel, to give an edge for the router to follow, so that’s something else to try.

    Any advice warmly welcomed.

    Regards,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  7. #182
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,954

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Waiting for Jay to chime in on this one. He's the Master Letterer! My best efforts look more like a kid with a crayon did them.

  8. #183
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Melb, Vic, Aus
    Posts
    670

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    I just purchased a set of swiss carving chisels off gumtree. I'm thinking that would be the way. (Says he who's never carved)
    you could always clamp a straight edge at the right distance to get your long straight lines with the router, or simply hold it with your left hand a router with your right. You may even be able to guide it around the radius's that way?

  9. #184
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Quote Originally Posted by Aquinian View Post
    Thanks Garret, Bruce, Phil, and Rick!

    That’s cream, straight out of the tin, Phil.

    I thought it it would be less yellow, and I was pretty much decided to add some white to the next coats, but it looks so good I am changing my mind. Also, I wanted that traditional colour and I realised I really don’t know what that is. . International Paints should know, however. It does seem to set off the timber nicely.

    I didn’t mask off to make the “panel” look. Laziness, lack of time, recognising my skill level, whatever, but afterwards that too seemed a good decision because thinking about it, it seems it’s really not traditional, it’s a feature of fibreglass boats. Am I right?

    Regards,
    John.
    This is one of the traditional canvas deck colors that Petit once sold under the name "Golden Ivory". It has several plus points that favor it for decks.
    It is dark enough to not cause the crew to be dazzeled by the sun reflected off of it but light enough to not cause much heat absorbtion and be hot on bare feet. It goes well with varnished trim and works with most topside colors.
    Jay

  10. #185
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    19,246

    Default

    I find that cream too yellow too. I have to make a decision on deck colour very soon. I think my dad used that cream at half strength. It was still a yellow but much gentler.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  11. #186
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Quote Originally Posted by Geftb View Post
    I just purchased a set of swiss carving chisels off gumtree. I'm thinking that would be the way. (Says he who's never carved)
    you could always clamp a straight edge at the right distance to get your long straight lines with the router, or simply hold it with your left hand a router with your right. You may even be able to guide it around the radius's that way?
    I think that's my next step, too, mate. But first I'll try with some ordinary chisels and see how it looks.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  12. #187
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Jay, that is just stunning presentation!

    What's your take on the carved lettering, if you wouldn't mind?

    Also, if anybody wants to chime in, a varnishing question. I'm applying Awlwood MA. We sanded, cleaned with acetone, applied three coats of clear primer and sanded after each coat, and again wiped down with acetone. The data sheets for the primer and the gloss imply that a single coat of primer suffices. My shipwright, who's used it for years now, said "at least two coats of primer and sand between coats" so I took his advice.

    We have applied three coats of gloss over the primer so far. The data sheet says that you can re-coat after two hours, but if you leave it more than 24 hours you need to sand again.

    I read in a few places (including, obviously, the Awlood MA data sheet) that sanding between every coat is not really necessary, and some pros never sand until prior to the final coat, so I decided not to sand after the first few at least, and see how it went.

    OK, so it was more than 24 hours after the third coat and I began hand sanding, and noticed that the surface was very uneven. I'm not talking about runs, or large areas of different height, but only the usual low "channels" that follow the grain. After a couple of minutes on one area (using 240 grit or maybe a bit finer, maybe 320, can't remember right now), the low spots were still apparent. I've obviously got a fair thickness of gloss on there for this to be the case. My question is, should I get the majority of the unevenness out and then re-coat, or would it be better to take way more off to get to a dead flat surface before continuing? If the latter, I think I should switch to a random orbital sander, or it will be a large and tedious job!

    Pics, which if you look closely, show the unevenness referred to. Note the cabin front panel, which shows it particularly well. I should have got a close-up of the newly sanded area, but I reckon experienced folks will know what it will look like.

    IMG_20190620_100103.jpg

    IMG_20190620_100119.jpg

    Regards,
    John.
    Last edited by Aquinian; 06-25-2019 at 10:35 PM.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  13. #188
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kailua, HI
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    I've not worked with that exact product, but with earlier multi-part Awlgrip clear finishes, it took a while to get enough thickness for a hard "flattening" sanding job. Filling the grain just takes some film thickness. I've seen pro, enclosed application procedures in which spraying allowed a bit quicker fill, but if brushing, a stage of knocking it flat seems to be the norm. Hopefully others with specific experience with this product will show up soon.

  14. #189
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  15. #190
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    19,246

    Default

    Nice one

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  16. #191
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Continuing with the carving experiment, this time with chisels. Not carving chisels, which I don’t have, but a couple of ordinary ones.

    Lessons so far: It’s hard to work out the intersections, especially where they are between two different width sections. It’s also hard to get the edges straight! It’s difficult to achieve a consistent depth, and a straight valley line. Grain tear-out is hard to avoid. Maybe this will be easier with hardwood. In any case, we want sharp chisels. For the skinny bits, I’m thinking a knife would be better. Lots to learn.

    BF2F2258-0256-4D03-B299-C942217F7EEE.jpg

    A8CDC6B3-D5FD-4321-B4FE-D2E6FE3F6C0B.jpg

    6D66B69E-7BBA-4EC8-BEAE-42874B2D00E3.jpg

    I tried cutting a line down the centre of the “I” to cut the grain and register the centre line, and that definitely improved the result.

    4B731BDF-ADED-46B6-83D0-D5105FB8F923.jpg

    B1F68567-6759-4FF4-87D4-BFB110281E01.jpg
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  17. #192
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    54FBCDEB-1640-4D1D-99FC-2AF58519D323.jpg

    E63BB69F-4487-4ED6-A3FA-47493B961E08.jpg

    Those two letters took less than an hour, so this is definitely do-able. I only have to carve eight.
    Last edited by Aquinian; 06-27-2019 at 07:02 AM.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  18. #193
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    I think if nothing else, at this point I have a good excuse, er sufficient reason, to splash out on a beginners carving chisel set.

    Jay, you around?

    Regards,
    John.

    Edit: Just cut the fourth letter. Curves are even harder. Need carving chisels to do this, but even with this low quality of carving I suspect that with the gold leaf over it, it may be fine.

    72388B76-93AA-478A-929F-2E4CF33AB263.jpg
    Last edited by Aquinian; 06-27-2019 at 08:31 AM.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  19. #194
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Plugging away...

    Found a piece of old jarrah with nice enough grain.

    FBA13815-AC9B-4A24-B626-80069CA29063.jpg

    A few minutes on the table saw and belt sander gave us these.

    3B9A468F-440D-4C93-946B-AFBBFB9E016F.jpg

    327E28E3-5337-46DE-816C-1622373E3B5C.jpg

    Watched a couple of YouTube videos and picked up some tips. This is a good one, glue the paper to the wood instead of tracing.

    9270A8E7-57D3-4022-B964-CB73090447AE.jpg

    Started applying my new carving knife to the task, and Albert decided to squeeze under my arm and check out the action. I suspect he saw a board and a knife, and thought “mmmm, cheese.”

    1E411636-772A-4362-9C58-676A25C83A90.jpg
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  20. #195
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    But then he got bored, and left me whittling away.

    A0A00456-82BF-451C-B6D0-54DA6FD2DBD9.jpg

    Picked up these, which really are fantastic for this work.

    C4E9DA7E-1B2B-48C2-8681-0C35AEF9E39F.jpg

    Here’s where we got to tonight. Good enough to be hidden by gold foil, I suspect.

    4B0077C5-A51E-4269-90B4-1514C6DED003.jpg

    Even better at a greater distance. At twenty feet it’ll be sensational.

    2E5643AF-9C58-4635-9389-85267F529F9C.jpg

    Cheers,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  21. #196
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Sorry John, I have not visited your project in a few days. So I apologize for my absence! I am glad to see that you chose the classic Roman Font for your carving! Roman letters that are gold leafed really have a knock out look when done well! The trick is to keep the carving as free of gouge marks as possible. Using a card scraper that has a single beveled edge will remove a lot of uneven marks. I make small ones up by sawing a standard French scraper blade into small pieces. Often a bit of glazing with Nitro Stan filler will help fill deep marks. Carefull block sanding with a block made of steel banding material is an aid in keeping the carving crisp.

    I mostly use a V gouge that has wings that are an inch in width. The length of the tool is rather short which allows following curves. I do carve all of the serrifs first by diving the tool into the serif from the outer point on every letter first from one direction and then from the other. This is only a diving of the gouge into the work and pulling it out in reverse. All cuts are made in rapid movement from both sides of the copy. Once all serrifs are cut, the removal of the wood begins using a strait #1 chisel. Then the follow up begins with cutting all of the straight ascenders and descenders, from the center in both directions using the big vee gouge. this gives an almost imperceptible hourglass shape to the verticals with the serifs being the termination of that shape. When done using a small metal maul such as this the work is easier to accomplish as the sharp blow of the setting maul severs the cross grain wood cleanly. https://www.amazon.com/Narex-Carving.../dp/B01MQX8NWR.
    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...0263&cat=1,140. The Lee Valley has the best balance of the two shown.

    Here is the job I did on Lynn and Larry Pardey's boat. Once the cartoon was traced on to the transom the actual carving took less than two hours. It would have gone faster if I wasn't interrupted but there was a party going on around me consisting a large crowd of well wishers. I didn't have anything to boost my spirits until the job was done.
    I never drink and carve!
    Jay

    Last edited by Jay Greer; 06-28-2019 at 04:44 PM.

  22. #197
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Here is the entry to my shop. The copy is not carved because we made up copies of the original by casting them in foam. So I had to make do with painted letters. There are hundreds of these that we sold all over the country. Some say Max Occupancy or so and some say Ladies or Men's Room, also Phone with an arrow. The original was carved in Maple. I always wanted to put pupils in the eyes of the mermaid. Maybe I will some Tuesday next week. All in all, I kind of like the combination of the carving and painted letters. Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 06-28-2019 at 05:20 PM.

  23. #198
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    19,246

    Default

    Looks good John, hand tools much better than electric for this job. Unless you have a full on CNC rig.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  24. #199
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Melb, Vic, Aus
    Posts
    670

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    I just scored these on gum tree for 200bucks.
    IMG_6287.jpg
    IMG_6288.jpg

  25. #200
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I find that cream too yellow too. I have to make a decision on deck colour very soon. I think my dad used that cream at half strength. It was still a yellow but much gentler.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    If the color is too yellow to your liking, you can tone it down a bit, with a point or two of lamp black. Be careful not to over do it when doing this or it will end up being the color of a muddy river on a dark night!
    Jay

  26. #201
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Nice set of carving tools! If you don't have them already, invest in a set of water lube slip stones. As it will keep your work clean. Also consider a graduated set of small taper cone stones. I prefer water stones but a white or black
    Arkansas flat oil stone can be handy. A leather strop with two grades of razor paste will help keep them in top tune but avoid too much pressure or angling the tool too much on the strop or you will end up with a blunt edge. If you can afford it, the Tormex system of sharpening is a spot on way to shape the entire cutting edge of the gouges to the optimum angle. Too much belly on the outer surface of a carving gouge can cause problems with control and ease of cutting, Hence the Tormex system which will evenly grind a gouge all around the curve to the correct angle. The big Vee gouge is your friend if you are carving Roman Letters.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 06-28-2019 at 10:21 PM.

  27. #202
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Oops, I did not intend to Hijack this thread! Sorry John!
    Jay

  28. #203
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Marvellous advice, with photos! Jay, that was all pure gold, and never think you’re hijacking my thread. It’s all endlessly interesting to me, and some of it might be within my very limited capabilities.

    Here’s the cabin side after sanding today with a random orbital. I decided not to go any deeper, and instead re-coated at this point. Was that a good choice?

    FB32FBEF-6C30-470A-B017-63C6A52F86AC.jpg

    6645C50F-D94E-4C61-9670-1C3D68ADBE32.jpg

    Regards,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  29. #204
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Off Center Harbor( note spelling) has a couple of videos about carving John. Can’t remember off hand about varnishing ones. Like most coating systems you have to choose one and learn on the job.

  30. #205
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Melb, Vic, Aus
    Posts
    670

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Nice set of carving tools! If you don't have them already, invest in a set of water lube slip stones. As it will keep your work clean. Also consider a graduated set of small taper cone stones. I prefer water stones but a white or black
    Arkansas flat oil stone can be handy. A leather strop with two grades of razor paste will help keep them in top tune but avoid too much pressure or angling the tool too much on the strop or you will end up with a blunt edge. If you can afford it, the Tormex system of sharpening is a spot on way to shape the entire cutting edge of the gouges to the optimum angle. Too much belly on the outer surface of a carving gouge can cause problems with control and ease of cutting, Hence the Tormex system which will evenly grind a gouge all around the curve to the correct angle. The big Vee gouge is your friend if you are carving Roman Letters.
    Jay
    Thanks Jay!!!

  31. #206
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Geftb, I wrote you a reply - in a nutshell, “jealous” - but the forum swallowed it.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  32. #207
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    Off Center Harbor( note spelling) has a couple of videos about carving John. Can’t remember off hand about varnishing ones. Like most coating systems you have to choose one and learn on the job.
    Sounds like realistic advice, Andrew, thank you!

    I’ll check out the videos.

    Regards,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  33. #208
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kailua, HI
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    With your clear coating progress:
    For me its always been that at some point there's enough film thickness to boldly sand right down to "flat", where the grain is completely filled and the sanded surface is uniform. Once flat, the final film is built up. Takes a while, depending on the wood species , how its been cut, and previous coatings, as well as how much can be laid down in each coat. There are various ways to fill grain at the beginning of the process, but I've had the best results on teak (appearance, longevity) with patience and persistence. You seem to have both, so I predict success!

  34. #209
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    Quote Originally Posted by Aquinian View Post
    Marvellous advice, with photos! Jay, that was all pure gold, and never think you’re hijacking my thread. It’s all endlessly interesting to me, and some of it might be within my very limited capabilities.

    Here’s the cabin side after sanding today with a random orbital. I decided not to go any deeper, and instead re-coated at this point. Was that a good choice?

    FB32FBEF-6C30-470A-B017-63C6A52F86AC.jpg

    6645C50F-D94E-4C61-9670-1C3D68ADBE32.jpg

    Regards,
    John.
    John That wood looks great! If you wish to retain the natural color of the wood, in the years to come by not allowing it to sun bleach, you can use filler stain to preserve the color. Oil based filler stains are made of natural earth pigment colors that will not sun bleach under varnish. If you choose to go that way, I have a few tricks that wil make to project much easier for you. Oops, I just noted that you have a coat on it already. Sorry, too late to stain.
    Jay

  35. #210
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,214

    Default Re: Fair Maid, 30’ Eric Cox sloop, 1951

    One note on Carving Roman Letters is to not create more work than is needed. Even in stone the Roman Font normally has serrifs that die into a point at the serif ends. Otherwise the carver needs fo create a diminishing to a point square end that is difficult to carve and cannot be seen unless at close inspection. If you are working with letters over ten inches high and want to do extra work, you can get fussy but not on smaller copy. When "Taliesen" was first carved the letters were crisp and clean. After all the years and nautical miles Lynn and Larry reeled off and all of the scrubbings of her bare teak transom, they ended up a little rough on the edges. I think it was oiled for the Wooden Boat Festival in PT.
    Jay

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •