Results 1 to 25 of 25

Thread: a recumbent for rob

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    90,734

    Default a recumbent for rob

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    15,697

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    This thread needs kitten pics.

    Peace,
    Robert

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
    Posts
    16,030

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Sorry, I couldn't find a pic of a cat on a recumbent; will this do?

    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    7,045

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Sorry, I couldn't find a pic of a cat on a recumbent; will this do?

    That is one cool cat.

    Jeff C

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Winnipeg MB
    Posts
    17,926

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    A. Recumbent. Tallbike.

    I am in awe. Really.

    What are you doing about it?




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,165

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    I tested a recumbent back when we were considering making them. Rode it daily for a couple of weeks. I loved everything about it - except for the visibility. Even with tall orange flags rigged fore and aft... I always had the constantly-clenched feeling that I was moments from being squashed. I'll pass.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    90,734

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I tested a recumbent back when we were considering making them. Rode it daily for a couple of weeks. I loved everything about it - except for the visibility. Even with tall orange flags rigged fore and aft... I always had the constantly-clenched feeling that I was moments from being squashed. I'll pass.
    in bike friendly portlandia?
    sad, bigly sad
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Winnipeg MB
    Posts
    17,926

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I tested a recumbent back when we were considering making them. Rode it daily for a couple of weeks. I loved everything about it - except for the visibility. Even with tall orange flags rigged fore and aft... I always had the constantly-clenched feeling that I was moments from being squashed. I'll pass.
    I never felt that way even once. I think I was in more danger from the rubberneckers than from people who didn't notice me.

    There's been a sharp uptick in trike traffic here, as they make more sense for winter riders. I haven't heard anyone on the local recumbent Facebook group express concern about visibility.

    What are you doing about it?




  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,094

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    This is my ride. Has been for 4 years.

    rex.jpg

    I feel safer on it than I have on any other bike I've owned! It's comfortable, kind to my bum knee, and therapeutic to my deteriorating hips. It's the only kind of bike that my back will allow me to ride! It puts me pretty much eyeball to eyeball with the driver of all but the largest of vehicles. I ride with a fabulous view of the world around me, not the asphalt beneath my handlebars. I don't race, so I don't care that the UCI has banned me and my bike.

    What would you rather sit on, a fence post or a lounge chair?

    recumbent-evolution.jpg
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Deepest Darkest Wales
    Posts
    19,935

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    more subtle

    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
    Posts
    16,030

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    I like bikes & their riders (I don't personally ride much anymore, and not at all in town), but I do have issues with recumbents. When I am driving my truck - and my truck isn't very big - and I overtake a person on a recumbent (giving as much room as I can on our local narrow two-lane roads), I dislike the way that they disappear for the ten or fifteen feet beside my truck between my view over the front fender and the field of view in my side mirror. Normal bike riders I can see their head and shoulders all along the side of the truck, but recumbents are too low. I realize that I can do a lot of hurt to the bike rider if something untoward were to happen, so I like to keep an eye on them at all times when we are in close proximity. Losing sight of one when they are within a few feet of my wheels spooks me out.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Winnipeg MB
    Posts
    17,926

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    To be fair, though, that's more of a problem with bike lane infrastructure and vehicle mirrors than with recumbents themselves.

    What are you doing about it?




  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    S.W. Florida
    Posts
    4,434

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I tested a recumbent back when we were considering making them. Rode it daily for a couple of weeks. I loved everything about it - except for the visibility. Even with tall orange flags rigged fore and aft... I always had the constantly-clenched feeling that I was moments from being squashed. I'll pass.
    It doesn't matter how visible you are, if you're not the size of a car, some people just don't see you. I was riding a bright yellow bike, wearing a dayglo yellow tee shirt and white helmet with catseye reflective tape on it, and some idiot decided she didn't need to stop & look when pulling out of a parking lot. While I was laid out on the hood of her car, she was inside having hysterics, screaming over and over, "I didn't see him! I didn't see him!" I told the investigating officer, "If she can't see me in this getup, she shouldn't be driving." He cracked up and agreed.

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,165

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    in bike friendly portlandia?
    sad, bigly sad
    Almost as bad. It was bike-friendly Eugene. Bike paths were fine, but the networks of bike lanes, and bike rouites, was at the time rudimentary. Anytime I went out in traffic, I was clenched.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,165

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Orca View Post
    To be fair, though, that's more of a problem with bike lane infrastructure and vehicle mirrors than with recumbents themselves.
    Very true.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,165

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by sharpiefan View Post
    It doesn't matter how visible you are, if you're not the size of a car, some people just don't see you. I was riding a bright yellow bike, wearing a dayglo yellow tee shirt and white helmet with catseye reflective tape on it, and some idiot decided she didn't need to stop & look when pulling out of a parking lot. While I was laid out on the hood of her car, she was inside having hysterics, screaming over and over, "I didn't see him! I didn't see him!" I told the investigating officer, "If she can't see me in this getup, she shouldn't be driving." He cracked up and agreed.
    Separate, though very real, issue. True for motorcycles as well. Our brains get acclimated to 'what' to look for... and we don't even see other things. I regard myself as sympathetic to, and aware of, two-wheeled vehicles... and I've caught myself looking thru them when distracted.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Posts
    9,807

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Back in the day I would commute 20 kms from Edmonton's south side to the west end, on the Whitemud Drive. Now that was an adrenaline filled ride!
    Nosce te ipsum

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,471

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I tested a recumbent back when we were considering making them. Rode it daily for a couple of weeks. I loved everything about it - except for the visibility. Even with tall orange flags rigged fore and aft... I always had the constantly-clenched feeling that I was moments from being squashed. I'll pass.
    Precisely why I sold my recumbent, everything else was about it great !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,091

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    I love riding my recumbent trikes. Your butt never hurts and downhills remind me of skiing, but I avoid riding them in traffic like the plague. The top of my helmet is only about three feet above the pavement and I certainly don't trust drivers to see and avoid me. Luckily, we have a lot of good trails in the area, and in town.

    Taken at this year's "Ride The Drive" event, where they close off one of the main drags in Madison and let the cyclists have it for a day.

    drive.jpg

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Freeland, WA
    Posts
    26,807

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Never have understood the appeal. Dangerous as hell. I feel the same way about trampolines.
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

    Resistance is NOT futile.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    7,045

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Riding a recumbent on a trampoline says something about a fella...

    I don't know if it says anything good--but it says something.

    Jeff C

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
    Posts
    16,030

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    Bike lanes? In rural Nova Scotia? Surely you jest...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,094

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    So, recumbent bicycles are too low to be seen. Most roads around here have white lines painted down the middle of them. Can you see those lines. If you answered no, please destroy your driver's license and never go near the wheel again. If you answered yes, then please explain to me how those lines can be plainly visible, yet my recumbent is too low to be seen. If I'm riding next to an ass hatchet with the rider in the drops, the difference between the height of our heads is too little to be significant. I've had a number of less than pleasant encounters with motor vehicles, but never because I wasn't seen. I was seen plainly, but the driver was pissed that I was occupying the real estate that he wanted to occupy. I'm certain that the outcomes would have been the same if I was on an upright.

    Never have understood the appeal. Dangerous as hell.
    Dangerous as hell??? More than an upright bike??? Please explain. Myself, I'd much rather arrive at my accident scene feet first rather than head first!

    When I first started riding bents, I was 64 years old, and hadn't been near a bike for 4 decades. My first ride was to a local park that I rode the length of - about 2 miles total. When I turned for home, I was wishing that my first ride was closer to 1 mile. I was wobbly and uncomfortable with my new toy. I did more than 200 miles on quiet residential streets before I dared riding in traffic. It was another 500 or 600 miles until muscle memory took over and I was able to ride without concentrating on every movement of my hands. Another 500 or so until I felt safe enough for cleats. A couple weeks practicing with the cleats until I could get my feet off the pedals almost as easily as performing an "Arte Johnson" (Remember Laugh In? Old guy on a trike. Benny Hill music in the background).

    My first ride with cleats was my first real ride on my bent. 5 miles through heavy traffic brought me to the LA River Bike Trail, a couple miles from where the river empties into the Pacific. I headed north along the river towards Los Angeles. I was relaxing on a BarcaLounger in my living room watching TV, but the TV had been replaced with a 360 3D experience. Just over an hour and a half later, I paused for a break. I was in Whittier, a hair more than 20 miles from home. I spent 15 or 20 minutes munching on munchies, hydrating, and having an enjoyable conversation with a couple of bikers who stopped to ask about my bike.

    The trip home was much slower and a lot more work. The 15 - 20 kt. tailwind that followed me north was now right in my face. I guess it was appropriate that the bike I was riding was a Rans Tailwind. One thing bents really have going for them is that they are much more aerodynamic than upright bikes. I briefly considered what I'd now be going through on an upright. Then I went back to smiling uncontrollably. We bent riders call this a "Recumbent Grin".

    I got home having spent almost exactly 4 hours in the seat. I was exhausted. My legs felt like rubber. But.......

    My back felt better than it had in years.

    I didn't have a stiff neck from looking up from the drops.

    My arms didn't ache from supporting the weight of my upper body on my handlebars.

    And my groin. Let's just say that there was no sense of my just having ridden over 40 miles. My legs were done, but my groin could have gone another 100!

    My body was pain free...save the muscles in my legs.

    How's that for appeal?

    I understand that recumbents aren't for everyone. There's a pretty steep learning curve involved. Many people would rather follow the crowd than try anything different. You won't find a $200 recumbent at Wally World. I hope you can at least understand that there is an appeal, and it's a very strong one to a number of people.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Winnipeg MB
    Posts
    17,926

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    I concur.

    What are you doing about it?




  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,094

    Default Re: a recumbent for rob

    One other thing that my feeble brain cells forgot to mention. What's the single most dangerous maneuver that can be performed on a bike. Okay, I may be overstating the matter, but for my money, the answer is flying ass over teakettle over the handlebars. That particular trick is pretty much IMPOSSIBLE on a bent.

    In all fairness to those who like to ride on step ladders, there are disadvantages to a recumbent. Bents are specifically banned from many forms of public transit, such as Amtrack. They tend to be a bit on the heavy side. With some exceptions, they're not great climbers. The bent world offers a dizzying array of bike types to try to choose from. Finding the right bent for you can become a daunting task. We have short wheel base recumbents, long wheelbase recumbents, high racers, low racers, and front wheel drive moveable bottom bracket bents to name a few. You can equip your bent with praying hamster handlebars, tweener bars, superman bars, machine gun bars, under-seat steering, indirect steering, and many recumbents have tiller steering. When I buy a new chain, I need 3 standard length chains. I recently replaced the fabric cover for my seat bottom - $35. I will soon need a new mesh seatback - $150. If I need to replace my seat - $400. You need to be prepared to have conversations with perfect strangers. "Is that thing as comfortable as it looks? Did you build that? Where can I get one? How much does it cost?"

    You all probably now know much more about recumbent bikes than you want to. I'll shut up now. Let me just leave you with these final words.

    It doesn't have to hurt to ride a bike!!!
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •