Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123 ... LastLast
Results 36 to 70 of 184

Thread: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    For daysailing and along-shore cruising the Alerion 28 is indeed wonderful. Most I've seen and the one I sailed on, like the one pictured, have no lifelines but can be worked from the cockpit. My sailmaker is a real fan of that bent jib boom and tried to talk me into one but it's not for me. Sheet handling is very easy and the boat I was on did not bother with sheet winches in the cockpit. Just one winch for the main halyard. With the right nosegear that could also be your anchor winch for a hard breakout but mostly you'd just sail over to capsize the hook. Were I living on Cuttyhunk I would surely have on sitting at the end of my private dock. Sail over to the Dog for breakfast.
    wouldn't that be the life. LHF would approve.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London SE23
    Posts
    687

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I am apparently now 66 and hope Emerald, acquired last autumn, will prove single-handable into my dotage. Planned measures to make this possible include lazyjacks on the main and a manual anchor windlass. The latter can only be mounted right in the bow above the bowsprit on a fabricated tunnel of some kind for things to line up, and this has to be demountable for retracting the bowsprit in a marina. The whole arrangement will get a canvas cover to minimise risk of entanglements and slow the pitting of the windlass casing. The 150ft of 3/8" chain stows in the bow and I don't want to disturb that & retrim the boat. If it won't fit one of the two Lofrans Royal 10mm gypsies, it'll be new chain, which may be 8mm, so perhaps 1/3 lighter but likely just as strong as her old chain. Without major engineering to the gammon iron, retracting the sprit can only be done by raising the butt end to about 25 degrees to clear the bitts, so it will be sort of 'steeved up' but by the wrong end. It won't wiggle sideways enough to clear the bitts. She has W/M gear on the jib but not the staysail, which is hanked on. I don't think I'll mess with that other than to add a downhaul. I just recanvassed the cabin roof, it was a lot easier than I expected, using PVA and masonry paint. In fact I messed up one of the corners and left some wood exposed. Rather than rip it off and start over, I just put another layer of canvas on, and it feels a lot better for that. She is still not quite afloat but we're hopeful for the early September Albert Strange Meet in Woodbridge. She has opened up quite a bit but I'm told she'll take up OK, and have handed 'wooding' her below the WL (her bottom paint is all loose), and priming/painting/puttying, over to the yard, as I am out of time to do it myself.


  3. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Derby, UK
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I have sailed many hundreds of miles in service Nic 55s. They are very powerful boats whic I would only consider if I had a big strong crew. Also they've probably done more miles than almost any other yachts, so if buying one consider that the hull and deck may need extensive work and everything else (including bulkheads which were worked on extensively many times) will probably need throwing away and replacing. By then is it still a good price?

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,778

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Ian brings a lot to this subject. He has been close to that edge for many years, and does not seem to be backing down. Having done the bigger boat thing 40'+ I have gone smaller, with no regrets...I'll admit I do sometimes see a big boat that inspires me. Ian's Meg ' being one.
    I'll totally agree with Ian regarding fully battened sails....main and mizzen. The battens do a wonderful job of taming those unruly moments. They also allow for a lower centre of effort and more efficiency near the masthead...
    I am not as convinced as Ian of the benefits of no winches.
    I could get away without winches (I have two small sheet winches), with my little sails. I can nearly always whip the jib in and secure the sheet on a tack. Timing is the thing. With a purchase on the jib sheet you really get less mechanical advantage than even a small winch, and you have to pull in twice the length of rope before the wind fills the sail. Self tending jibs/staysails are really nice and for a cruising boat a real boon. You loose a little sailing efficiency without some overlap, but the sail is almost hoisted and forgotten. The other downside is the presence of the boom on the foredeck, just waiting to trip you when your not paying attention. In reality you quickly get used to it and I never ever remember anyone tripping over ours on Windrush or on Tramp. The only reason I do not have a self tending jib for Whimbrel is that I have two good working jibs and a genoa, so spending the money on another new jib just does not make it up to the top of the list.
    I'll support the no halyard winches because the halyards can be easily powered up using purchases. I like Herreshoffs Open Snatch Blocks but I have gone with a single halyard with a purchase for my short gaffs.
    I am open to being convinced on no winches.
    Up to the about the size of the 'Meg' I'd seriously look for a good hand windlass. I know nearly all boats these days have a powered windlass, and they are reliable, and as I said earlier I have had a couple of anxious moments on larger boats hauling in by hand. I like the hand solutions. I currently have ~40' of chain and then rope. I like this combination because I can hand over hand to haul in short and just use the windlass for breaking out and bringing the hook home. In a crowded harbor on a blustery day, this still may be done in stages. I'd still use this technique on something the size of Meg'
    I do not have an auto-helm or vane steering, though I think being able to sail hands free is vital for a single hander You need to be able to take a pee, make a sandwich, or check the chart. Fortunately Whimbrel easily trims to sail hands free on any point of sail, losing little or no real efficiency. I have never sailed any boat before that was as reliable and comprehensive in this quality. I have sailed a 60+ nm passage which included both windward elements and reaching without actually touching the helm, just the sheets. I suspect Ian's Meg' may do this as well.
    When reefing I simply slack the sheet of the selected sail, readjust the helm to keep sailing, tuck in the reef..slack halyard enough......tack...clew...points...re-hoist....sheet in...readjust helm. I actually loose little speed, never stop sailing. It all takes about 1 minute. What is this powering up into the wind stuff? You need to work on that. On sloops and cutters I have sometimes tacked and hove-to to reef, but normally just put the helm a-lee and slacked the main. That should unload it enough to make it easy. Reefing on a really small boat can be more challenging than a somewhat larger boat. Working area is a factor Is there a lot of stuff to potentially trip over?
    Whatever the set-up I think there is something to be gained in regularly moving around the deck and maintaining skills....reefing or striking sails should not be scary. If it is you have maybe left it too long, or maybe your set-up need attention. It should be as easy and natural as possible.....To "Hand Reef and Steer"

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    45,267

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I love that flip-on 3:1 halyard. Had one like that on our old Nerasketuk.

    On the winches - Even a small jib with 2:1 like a Wianno Senior had is enough work that all have snubbing winches. Capt. Chuck in Florida has snubbing winches on the tackle for his Golden Ball's leeboards. I have cam cleats. Either rest the hands as you trim. But you very rarely see sheet winches for end of boom sheets even of large sails. And for a boomed staysail or jib, that's what applies.

    Of course the anchor windlass. I'll get a pic up sometime.

    One place a halyard winch comes in handy is if you have crew one person can be hoisted aloft by the other. But when you're solo, you go up on your own muscle.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norwalk CT
    Posts
    945

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Horses for courses....

    Id be single handing a full keel masthead sloop in the 30-35 foot range, not a schooner or a leeboard ketch. Ive never been on a leeboard ketch. Ian's experience is far greater and varied than mine.

    Dutchman reefing is indeed the system with lines that weave through the mainsail attached at the boom and topping lift. With full battens the sail drops flaked right onto the boom. No integral sail cover. A quick wrap with a single sail tie mid boom will keep everything under control in all but the worst weather.

    I cant imagine trimming a headsail on a 30 footer without winches. Two speed self tailing makes it simple and easy to trim hard and fast or just tweak. With the main traveller aft the helm and good tackle the main can be trimmed with one hand, no winch.

    With a roller furled headsail the only halyard Im going to touch more than twice a season is the main. With a winch and a stopper on the coach roof the sail can be raised and dropped from the cockpit. Id rather not have to scamper around on deck if I dont have to.

    My cruising is from Norwalk Ct to Fishers, Block, Cuttyhunk and The Vineyard. From Block to Cuttyhunk on a good day is six hours on a long reach. Set the autohelm and relax. Rig a fishing pole and drag a big spoon for a blue. Enjoy a cup of coffee, do the eleventeen little things that need fixing, fiddling with. Autohelm is a luxury. Having an autohelm doesnt relieve you of having to trim properly. The helm should be balanced when you turn the thing on, its not an excuse to be a sloppy sailor.

    Same with a windlass. Ive never had one but as long as Im dreaming, why not?

    We all see sailing through the lenses of our own experience, education and skill set. What works for me doesnt have to work for anyone else unless youre crewing for me on my boat...

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,770

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I often singlehand Drake , which is 46 ft sparred length, 40 ft LOD. Ketch rigged. No roller furling. No fancy gear. I'm 61. No autopilot.

    The big thing is, you don't have to sail the thing to its max. You can take it down a step. When I'm solo, I'm very conservative about everything! I hank on the working jib or the storm jib, never the genoa. I often reef the main before leaving the anchorage. Often I sail with just jib and mizen.

    Sure, I'm not winning any races. So what? She still moves along OK and I'm having fun.

    A mooring is much easier than a cramped dock. I don't paint myself into corners. I look ahead and be as proactive as possible.

    A large, long keel boat can be naturally stable. The motion is easier. She may self-steer -- Drake does when on the wind. I value the ketch rig very highly.

    I pick good anchorages -- no adventures at 03:00.

    Sometimes I motor.

    I don't much like sanding a large hull though.

    Dave

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    23,182

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Dave’s thinking is in line with mine. You don’t have to sail a boat “to her full potential”. You can use smaller headsails,put a reef in before you start, avoid marinas, and so on.

    I know very well that a big Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter, of similar size and displacement, is an easy singlehander if you take things gently, but it’s fair to say that, like Thames barges, they were designed to be sailed that way, and you won’t be winning any races.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,778

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    One place a halyard winch comes in handy is if you have crew one person can be hoisted aloft by the other. But when you're solo, you go up on your own muscle.
    Good point. I used to hand over hand up the mast, several times for a job....always forget something.....I am not quite so tough now. I am very glad I have a purchase on my halyards. It is very difficult to actually get right to the top.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norwalk CT
    Posts
    945

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Its about making things easy. I know when I get to Block that Im going to need 20 fathoms of rode to anchor in the Pond. When I haul up to leave I will find the 20 fathom tag and flake the line in the locker so when I get there all I have to do is thrown the line on the cleat and heave the hook in the water.
    The main halyard is marked for the reef points. When the marks are between the winch and the stopper its ready to tie off.
    Pipe, lighter and an Altoids tin of tobacco in the helm seat locker.
    Its the little things....

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    2,186

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    ACB,

    That boat is a dog, it will be hard to sail shorthanded and its a money pit. You couldn't give me that thing! It has no redeeming features whatsoever.
    whatever rocks your boat

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    West Wales, UK
    Posts
    470

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    Last week I was giving a lecture at Madingley Hall, and, having some time to kill, I took the family punting on the "backs". It was a good forty years since I had tried it, and I was very hesitant about climbing onto the afterdeck with the pole. Indeed I toyed with the shameful idea of punting from the Oxford end. After a minute I sorted myself out and was quite happy, and, although I cannot make the speeds that I did when I was twenty, I was not at all tired when we got back.

    Jeremy - here's the answer:

    https://www.berthon.co.uk/yacht-for-...n-55-kukri.pdf

    I have always fancied these... and because she is too big, and not "fitted out as a yacht", she is correspondingly cheap.

    It's not that I intend to singlehand such a beast - it's just the thought that one might need to so.
    All the Joint Services Nic 55s have been hard sailed throughout their lives, so I would only buy with my eyes wide open. Lovely, lovely boats to sail though. With a full crew of 12 on board living conditions could at times seem a bit Black Hole like - even for the afterguard !
    Nick

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    23,182

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Whameller View Post
    All the Joint Services Nic 55s have been hard sailed throughout their lives, so I would only buy with my eyes wide open. Lovely, lovely boats to sail though. With a full crew of 12 on board living conditions could at times seem a bit Black Hole like - even for the afterguard !
    They could be quite nice with a crew of 5, though!

    I don’t want a boat that is going to last for ever; I just want a boat that will last ten years of being sailed more gently to more interesting places!

    To be honest, I see these boats as today’s equivalents of Tilman’s pilot cutters.

    Tilman had a very good surveyor - John Tew, who was a personal friend. I have Martin Evans...

    Need to find our as much as possible about structural issues.

    I don’t need the three spinnakers or the big genoas. I will need the trysails and storm staysails.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Auckland ,N.Z.
    Posts
    24,854

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul G. View Post
    ACB,

    That boat is a dog, it will be hard to sail shorthanded and its a money pit. You couldn't give me that thing! It has no redeeming features whatsoever.
    You're so funny sometimes Paul. I've raced against a few Nicholsons of that vintage in the tall ships event and they always perform very well so 'dog' is definitely not a description I would apply. But I do agree with you about the money pit ,and a page back we have some really pertinent comments by Peterv, who confirms from first hand experience what we would expect in terms of power and loadings , plus that very telling remark about how hard they've been used and the particular issue they have with bulkheads.

    I like these threads, thought provoking.
    One of things that I have come across a bit over the last few years is relevant, and that is what sort of weight can a man move on a boat regularly, effectively . That figure is somewhere in the 25 to 30 kg mark, 40 being out at the end of the useful spectrum.. Obviously one can pick up a lot more than that but when you talk boat stuff, Dinghy.. outboard , sail in a bag , spinnaker pole, liferaft? , you aren't lifting it like weights in a gym , its at a stretch or cantilevered over the side of the deck. Interestingly a standard builders weight used to be around 40 kg with a sack of cement , say 90 lb, but thats on flat level ground.
    More relevant perhaps is that scaffolders used to have a magic figure of 64 lb for a 21 ft steel tube and a bag of fittings was made up to the same. A plank was not supposed to exceed that either, but of course you got the green ones. 64 Lb..29 kilos.
    I use that weight as a guideline of what I want to handle when its not flat calm, doesn't sound like a lot but that big jib I referred to earlier is really awkward and hard to handle at around that weight. I don't want a 15 hp outboard because they're 36 kilos and you need to hold em away, so my 9.9 at 26 is ideal and 'safe' to move.
    An exception might be the liferaft in a valise . Cat 1 mandates that must not exceed 40 kg, although I think you find extra strength when you need a liferaft. But its interesting that that figure is written down as a max indicator of what a human should handle at sea.
    Anyway, thats my rambling thought for the day.... What started me off? I just posted the youngest daughter off to J.O.E last night and she packed her bag to the 30 kg limit. I lifted it to the car and pulled the handle off. Awkward in several ways.
    Last edited by John B; 07-12-2018 at 05:19 PM.

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    23,182

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Ray Wall was a very good designer!

    It is often said that the Joint Services had looked around again and again for replacements for their Nic 55s and couldn’t find anything so carried on with them. They more or less replaced the Navy’s Morgan Giles boats.

    I want to know more about bulkheads...

    Very pertinent Thought For The Day, John!
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Really now?

    There is no talk about sailing when conditions turn. A man in his mid sixties should be in a safe boat. I read more times than not about men who go out sailing in their boats being rescued or lost because their boats has complicated reefing points, multiple sails which were too hard to change or drop, a stuck rollerfurler, going forward on the bow to do work and so on which drives them into carelessness, distraction, overwhelms them physically or breaks do to complications of the complications. I need not reminds anyone here that most of these rescued or found dead are older men above the age of 60.

    That Albert Strange above is a very beautiful boat for sure. As a single hander, not ideal. Yeah - one can sail nearly anything single handedly when conditions are good.

    The questions was:

    What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Very few people even answered it. The answer is one that is seaworthy (not a project), not complicated, can fend off when needing too, can climb on and off dock with ease, has few sails, strings and blocks as possible, has a great auxiliary power and a place to nap when old men get tired or worn out.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 07-12-2018 at 07:09 PM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Grosse Pointe, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    13,863

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    That's pretty good. FWIW. SWMBO and I are 73. The last thing we worry about is the effort--on a larger boat, the winches, windlass, etc. tend to be powerful, and the physical effort is mainly much less than on a smaller boat. The exception is large sails in heavy air that try to flap you to death. One could make the case that a larger boat is easier to handle offshore.

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,778

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I think the thread has moved away from single handing, on the above mentioned boat. It needs a crew. It also need a very close survey to see if it is fit for the intended voyage...what is the intended voyage?

    Ted...I think you are on the wrong thread...you should be on the boat suitable for old timers...last year.
    All this is subjective... a fit man of 60's is not much diminished from another man of 50 or less. A persons skill level is based on their knowledge and experience. Modern equipment compensates for a lot of personal limits....lets face it a 14 year old circumnavigated.
    What boat is suitable for a person is very subjective. While I prefer a boat say 30-40', Ian has chosen a much larger boat.
    The fact that there are old fools out there, does not imply that all are old fools.
    Well we are on the WBF.....

  19. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McCosh View Post
    That's pretty good. FWIW. SWMBO and I are 73. The last thing we worry about is the effort--on a larger boat, the winches, windlass, etc. tend to be powerful, and the physical effort is mainly much less than on a smaller boat. The exception is large sails in heavy air that try to flap you to death. One could make the case that a larger boat is easier to handle offshore.
    I am glad you are still at it. good for you!

    The offshore concept is a fantasy. very few sail off shore. single handing is mostly daysailing.

    This is the first book one should read on the subject on single handed sailing. Good single handed sailors choose smaller boat.



    http://sfbaysss.org/resource/doc/Sin...rdEdition2.pdf

    the opening

    If I was the richest man in the world,
    I’d have a bigger boat and newer sails.
    But on a Saturday afternoon with only God and the wind,
    I wouldn’t be any happier than I am right now.


    Over the past ten years I’ve gone single handed sailing more than eight hundred times. I started just four days after getting my first boat and have rarely looked back. Included in this are more than 250 individual races. In total, it adds up to perhaps 3,500 hours of singlehanded sailing – a reasonable start.With all of these times that I have left the dock, I have never – not even once – had a bad day on the water. I’ve had days when things went wrong; difficult things, expensive things. I’ve had days when the wind blew more than most could handle, and I’ve had days when it didn’t blow at all. But I have never had a day that didn’t live up to its full potential, when I wished I had been somewhere else. I am certain that very few sailors in the world can make the same claim.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 07-12-2018 at 07:32 PM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  20. #55
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    45,267

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I am certain that very few voluntary sailors cannot make the claim, live the life. The reason is actually quite simple - when sailing one lives in intimate contact with the universe.

  21. #56
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    The boats in this years single handed transpac. Many are my friends.

    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    I think the thread has moved away from single handing, on the above mentioned boat. It needs a crew. It also need a very close survey to see if it is fit for the intended voyage...what is the intended voyage?

    Ted...I think you are on the wrong thread...you should be on the boat suitable for old timers...last year.
    All this is subjective... a fit man of 60's is not much diminished from another man of 50 or less. A persons skill level is based on their knowledge and experience. Modern equipment compensates for a lot of personal limits....lets face it a 14 year old circumnavigated.
    What boat is suitable for a person is very subjective. While I prefer a boat say 30-40', Ian has chosen a much larger boat.
    The fact that there are old fools out there, does not imply that all are old fools.
    Well we are on the WBF.....
    Anyone who owns a boat could be labeled a fool. A wooden one a laughing stock.

    If one posts asking about the limits of the largest vessel to single hand... then they may have no idea their own limitation and moreover suggests they are of limited experience.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 07-14-2018 at 11:25 PM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Auckland ,N.Z.
    Posts
    24,854

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Offshore?, most of the people we met sailing/ cruising offshore are 60 plus couples, I believe its a well known demographic. Its also pretty obvious that boats have 'grown' over the last few decades due to better ways and mechanisation of jobs through power winches and furling gear. A 40 footer is quite normal and on the small side with many boats in the 45 to 50 ft range and quite a few 50 to 60 foot .
    Example :473 Beneteau,(47 ft) they're everywhere. example :40 ft Beale we cruised with, one of the 'small' boats of the groups we met up or sailed beside. Occasionally we'd see a 35 footer and they would be stand out tiny' boats nowadays. One 26 footer! ( teeny!)
    I'm following several of our friends we met last year and they're late 50's through to early 70's, I sit here at my desk getting depressed watching them make passage from here to Tonga or Fiji, and the passages in between..... it happens all the time .
    The people we meet in their 40's or 50's have usually really made some serious life strategic decisions, maybe no kids or house , sort of dropped out or who work 6 months and cruise 6 months.
    50's age group we look at and think yep.. got their act together, live it while you have it.
    Last edited by John B; 07-12-2018 at 08:07 PM.

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Offshore?, most of the people we met sailing/ cruising offshore are 60 plus couples, I believe its a well known demographic. Its also pretty obvious that boats have 'grown' over the last few decades due to better ways and mechanisation of jobs through power winches and furling gear. A 40 footer is quite normal and on the small side with many boats in the 45 to 50 ft range and quite a few 50 to 60 foot .
    Example :473 Beneteau,(47 ft) they're everywhere. example :40 ft Beale we cruised with, one of the 'small' boats of the groups we met up or sailed beside. Occasionally we'd see a 35 footer and they would be stand out tiny' boats nowadays. One 26 footer! ( teeny!)
    I'm following several of our friends we met last year and they're late 50's through to early 70's, I sit here at my desk getting depressed watching them make passage from here to Tonga or Fiji, and the passages in between..... it happens all the time .
    The people we meet in their 40's or 50's have usually really made some serious life strategic decisions, maybe no kids or house , sort of dropped out or who work 6 months and cruise 6 months.
    50's age group we look at and think yep.. got their act together, live it while you have it.
    Those are folks who make you think - oh man! where did i make a wrong tack?

    but lets consider the percentage of folks who own boats and those who cruise them. My guess would be less than 1%. Slightly more for your more civilized antipodeans but not much.

    Sailing as a dedicated couple is different than solo sailing. My guess is the OP was day dreaming. As i age, I like to sail with others more. If I go solo sailing it is for a few hours. Truthfully, a small boat that is easy set up, sail and to put away is ideal.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 07-12-2018 at 08:45 PM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  25. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2,316

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul G. View Post
    ACB,

    That boat is a dog, it will be hard to sail shorthanded and its a money pit. You couldn't give me that thing! It has no redeeming features whatsoever.

    That's a bit harsh. They were quick for their day and while it's not my style of boat, they've got lots of strong points and many experienced sailors love them. She's (IMHO) too big for a boat to be regularly singlehanded but with a zero-overlap jib or just using the staysail in a breeze, she'd tramp along pretty well. Not my sort of boat, but as Gilberj says, it's a personal choice and some in their 60s are fitter than most in their 40s.
    Has BigFella and SkyBlue on ignore.

  26. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    23,182

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    The specifics are that my two sons and I are playing with the idea of a long voyage. So, yes, daydreaming, if you like.

    From the point of view of those able to sail the boat, one retired man, one merchant navy officer available for three months at a time and then unavailable for six, a medical student who could take a gap year, and the possibility of various friends. You can see that whilst the plan comes down to three months of voyage followed by six months of ship keeping, things might very easily go pear shaped from the crew point of view.

    Hence the question.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  27. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,778

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    As I thought, the plan has changed, no longer thinking of single handing.... Good Luck.
    Back to the OP and the subject of single handing.....As each of us has contributed...what kind of voyage are we thinking of?
    My voyage is mainly Near Coastal, mostly in fairly remote areas. There is a real possibility of some passage making up to perhaps ~200nm. I am not live-aboard and not planning long distance voyaging. Those guys doing the SHTP still can fall into this category....so they take a passage to Hawaii (and back?). If I were thinking of voyaging, I think I'd probably choose a different boat and doubt I'd consider single handing. I have a good friend that has recently upgraded her boat, planning a trip to NZ ( has family there ) She now has a 45 sloop. She will add an inner staysail and a few other particular mods. She will have a crew which will include her son and 1 or more adults.

  28. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    The specifics are that my two sons and I are playing with the idea of a long voyage. So, yes, daydreaming, if you like.

    From the point of view of those able to sail the boat, one retired man, one merchant navy officer available for three months at a time and then unavailable for six, a medical student who could take a gap year, and the possibility of various friends. You can see that whilst the plan comes down to three months of voyage followed by six months of ship keeping, things might very easily go pear shaped from the crew point of view.

    Hence the question.
    I really like your dream. As you know the ocean is a desert.

    I would plan on a comfortable quick coastal cruiser 32' fractional sloop with a small yanmar, able to sail on a zephyr with fresh beds, a pleasant cooker, a water maker, a 12 liter water heater, and a odorless working head would be near perfect. a high cut roller jib and a hard rubber dinghy to shore. My way of thinking is if you keep it under 32 feet and less than 5 tons, you will not need a windless for your anchor or overly complicate the rigging and sails management.

    I believe you can sail that boat above anywhere, stay on it for days, small enough to tuck in a marina when you want to explore, big enough to entertain 8 and sleep 4.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  29. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    23,182

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    As I thought, the plan has changed, no longer thinking of single handing.... Good Luck.
    Back to the OP and the subject of single handing.....As each of us has contributed...what kind of voyage are we thinking of?
    My voyage is mainly Near Coastal, mostly in fairly remote areas. There is a real possibility of some passage making up to perhaps ~200nm. I am not live-aboard and not planning long distance voyaging. Those guys doing the SHTP still can fall into this category....so they take a passage to Hawaii (and back?). If I were thinking of voyaging, I think I'd probably choose a different boat and doubt I'd consider single handing. I have a good friend that has recently upgraded her boat, planning a trip to NZ ( has family there ) She now has a 45 sloop. She will add an inner staysail and a few other particular mods. She will have a crew which will include her son and 1 or more adults.
    No. Same plan. As I thought I explained, I think it unwise to have a boat that one cannot singlehand, case need. Hence the question.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  30. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    23,182

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    k
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    I really like your dream. As you know the ocean is a desert.

    I would plan on a comfortable quick coastal cruiser 32' fractional sloop with a small yanmar, able to sail on a zephyr with fresh beds, a pleasant cooker, a water maker, a 12 liter water heater, and a odorless working head would be near perfect. a high cut roller jib and a hard rubber dinghy to shore. My way of thinking is if you keep it under 32 feet and less than 5 tons, you will not need a windless for your anchor or overly complicate the rigging and sails management.

    I believe you can sail that boat above anywhere, stay on it for days, small enough to tuck in a marina when you want to explore, big enough to entertain 8 and sleep 4.
    This is what I have now:




    A composite Ohlson38



    http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=1817

    She probably has the same internal volume as your putative modern 32 footer; she has a 30hp engine and yes she does have a windlass.

    I have found that I do like this sort of hull form, which the big Nicholsons also have.
    Last edited by Andrew Craig-Bennett; 07-13-2018 at 01:30 PM.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  31. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    2,156

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    I borrowed a library book last year about preparing a boat for the ageing sailor.
    A good companion book would be about preparing the aging sailor for the boat.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    11,670

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    L Francis Herreshoff often designed large boats that could be handled by one person. My favorite design is the Marco Polo a three masted
    ketch of 55 feet in length with ten feet of beam. It has no sail that is lager than one person can handle and has been proven to be a good passage maker for a small crew. Some single handers have made epic voyages in these boats. In my own humble opinion, the boat is fine the way it was designed. But some persons prefer to modify Mr. Herreshoff's design by choosing a two masted rig, thereby moving away from the concept of an easy rig for one person to handle. The narrow beam makes this boat easy to drive with power supplied by a small displacement diesel making it very economical to motor sail if that is desired. This Marco Polo was built by my friend Stan Bishoprick and his father. Stan has crossed over the bar and I understand that the family is considering selling the boat. It has been to Hawaii and back and has a very beautiful interior.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 07-13-2018 at 12:56 PM.

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    11,670

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    L Francis Herreshoff often designed large boats that could be handled by one person. My favorite design is the Marco Polo a three masted
    ketch of 55 feet in length with ten feet of beam. It has no sail that is lager than one person can handle and has been proven to be a good passage maker for a small crew. Some single handers have made epic voyages in these boats. In my own humble opinion, the boat is fine the way it was designed but some persons prefer to modify Mr. Herreshoff's design by choosing a two masted rig, thereby moving away from the concept of an easy rig for one person to handle. The narrow beam makes this boat easy to drive with power supplied by a small displacement diesel making it very economical to motor sail if that is desired.
    Jay

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    11,670

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Sorry for the double post here guys. Can't get it to delete!
    Jay

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    15,028

    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    How long can an old guy stay awake?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •