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Thread: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

  1. #106
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Very smart move Andrew, that big C&N might have been worth it if you intended a ROW but for local sailing and cruising what you have is a far better boat in almost every respect as far as shorthanding goes.
    whatever rocks your boat

  2. #107
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I was saving up hydrovane for next, dammit. And I was going to suggest Reefrite roller gear, but I don't know if they're available there.

  3. #108
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    Dutchman flaking. Simple and sooooo effective.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #109
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Dutchman flaking. Simple and sooooo effective.
    How well does it do with rather hard mainsail material?

    My pet gadget is a permanent boom gallows. Parks the boom securely whilst you faff around with the sail, and guarantees that you won't get brained if the topping lift fails.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  5. #110
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    There is no limit, except in your mind. Become an excellent boat handler, navigator and plan your dockings. Go over your boat and look for problems that could cause flooding, failure or fires and fix them now. I solo because I got tired of the trouble that all women bring. I tried hiring a house keeper/cook, but in the long run that doesn't work. Either they have marriage hopes or forget to tell you about their boyfriend that just got out of San Quentin and wants to steal you blind.
    I'm 70 and been on the water or nearby all my life. Navy trained navigator, etc. So maybe it's different for me. I solo much more often than with people on board. I live on an 83' powerboat and winter on the Columbia River. Summers I usually travel to Alaska, sometimes with friends on board. If I'm making long passages like across the Gulf of Alaska, I look for people that want to go along. Otherwise on short hop, if a friend wants to come fine, otherwise I go when I go. I gave up sailing some years ago because of arthritis caused by injuries. The powerboat is easier to handle and more comfortable for old bones. I don't see any end yet.
    It's all in the mind. There are risks alone, like injuries, fires, and so on, but to me the quiet is more than worth it. All the time I worked on the water, I dreamed of something like I have now. Traveling I mostly anchor and use a shore boat to go for supplies. I only tie to fuel docks. I plan my dockings and don't fight heavy winds or tides. My lines are laid out and ready. I get a spring line over from the bow and with rudders and one engine in gear at idle, the forces position the boat alongside. When all movement is stopped, I get the other lines over. No big deal. I've done it hundreds of times.
    Learn how to handle your boat well. Most yachties never do. Each landing is a controlled crash, and with luck no damage.

  6. #111
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    How well does it do with rather hard mainsail material?

    My pet gadget is a permanent boom gallows. Parks the boom securely whilst you faff around with the sail, and guarantees that you won't get brained if the topping lift fails.
    Depends a bit what rather hard is I suppose. But i suspect very well. Because the fall lines weave back and forth through the sail itself, the sail will develop subtle fold lines. I think full length battens help too. On our boat the main just flaked itself beautifully. None of the getting hung up you tend to see with lazy jacks.

  7. #112
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oceanmariner View Post
    There is no limit, except in your mind. Become an excellent boat handler, navigator and plan your dockings. Go over your boat and look for problems that could cause flooding, failure or fires and fix them now. I solo because I got tired of the trouble that all women bring. I tried hiring a house keeper/cook, but in the long run that doesn't work. Either they have marriage hopes or forget to tell you about their boyfriend that just got out of San Quentin and wants to steal you blind.
    I'm 70 and been on the water or nearby all my life. Navy trained navigator, etc. So maybe it's different for me. I solo much more often than with people on board. I live on an 83' powerboat and winter on the Columbia River. Summers I usually travel to Alaska, sometimes with friends on board. If I'm making long passages like across the Gulf of Alaska, I look for people that want to go along. Otherwise on short hop, if a friend wants to come fine, otherwise I go when I go. I gave up sailing some years ago because of arthritis caused by injuries. The powerboat is easier to handle and more comfortable for old bones. I don't see any end yet.
    It's all in the mind. There are risks alone, like injuries, fires, and so on, but to me the quiet is more than worth it. All the time I worked on the water, I dreamed of something like I have now. Traveling I mostly anchor and use a shore boat to go for supplies. I only tie to fuel docks. I plan my dockings and don't fight heavy winds or tides. My lines are laid out and ready. I get a spring line over from the bow and with rudders and one engine in gear at idle, the forces position the boat alongside. When all movement is stopped, I get the other lines over. No big deal. I've done it hundreds of times.
    Learn how to handle your boat well. Most yachties never do. Each landing is a controlled crash, and with luck no damage.
    Good for you!
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  8. #113
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    An update: I just spent 36 hours crewing on a friend’s Nicholson 55. It was interesting.

    We beat from the Solent to Plymouth against south westerlies between 28 knots and 5 knots, with a lot of 15-11 knots, in 33 hours, with a crew of 5, two of whom were my sons. The owner and a friend of his, both of whom are former RN submariners, were the real crew! We did put the engine on in the light bit past Portland when the tide was foul.

    Observations:

    First impression - “This thing has been built like a battleship” - including the damage control systems - what normal boat has five watertight compartments, a bilge manifold and weather tight doors to match, remote engine room fire systems and so on. The gear is all huge, much of it having been “rebuilt a bit stronger” over her 43 years of almost constant use as an HM Forces training vessel. But she has also been scrupulously maintained. Everything as it should be and where it should be, everything clean, nothing worn out.

    There were clear signs of “campaigns”; for instance one of the twelve sisters, “Lord Trenchard”, blew up because of a gas leak, seriously injuring one man. The gas detector now installed is quite a bit of kit..

    The engine is a Yanmar installed under the cockpit sole. Very quiet. Under power, she reliably stuck her stern into the wind in astern, and turned in quite a small space.

    Once under way she turns into a pussycat - with tigerish characteristics.

    She has a beautifully light, balanced, feel to the helm. Does not pull your arm out in any of the conditions we had, but does tell you, in no uncertain terms, what she wants! For instance, she wanted less draft in the mainsail, and she made that quite clear

    She heaves-to like a pilot cutter. Just sat there, heeling gently and making a square drift, like a big fat seagull, with no solid water on deck.

    The mainsail is loose footed with three big reefs. On the coach roof abaft the mast are three 42:1 two speeders for the topping lift, the kicker and the clew outhaul tackle inside the boom, and a damn great 53:1 self tailer for the reef pennants. The mainsail is not fully battened. It wasn’t hard to put in and shake out reefs, single handed, and the main and headsail halyards were not too hard for me. Sher has a nice aftermarket PTFE mainsail luff track.

    The bagged headsails are heavy. We didn’t use the big gennies but we used the #3 a lot. It can be carried up to 28knots and it has a tack line to keep it well clear of the deck. Tacking is a two man job with this sail. The jibs and staysails are easier, but still expletive deleted heavy!

    I think that if you sail her, as her owner does, and in his words, at about “60% rig power”, she is not too hard. At 95% power you need twelve gorillas. This increase in effort would give you one or two knots more on a passage.

    Her owner’s wish list is the same as NavyDave’s. Big power windlass, plumbed in autopilot, lazy jacks or Dutchman furling, more self tailers.

    Mine would include a rigid boom gallows. Her owner prefers a rigid kicker.

    Good headsail rolling would create another cabin, as you would only need to stow trysail, storm staysail and cruising chute. But in this size, good roller headsail reefing is “megabucks!”.

    ”In dreams”, electrically driven primary winches and headsail rolling would make her a complete pussycat.
    Last edited by Andrew Craig-Bennett; 08-07-2018 at 11:16 AM.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  9. #114
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Probably answer your query better than any of our comments.
    Sounds like a really good trip.

  10. #115
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McCosh View Post
    That's pretty good. FWIW. SWMBO and I are 73. The last thing we worry about is the effort--on a larger boat, the winches, windlass, etc. tend to be powerful, and the physical effort is mainly much less than on a smaller boat. The exception is large sails in heavy air that try to flap you to death. One could make the case that a larger boat is easier to handle offshore.
    I'm 69 and agree 100%. Offshore in a blow the 28' x 10k lb ketch can be way harder to handle than a 42' x 24k lb ketch. Much of it to do with easier motion, wider decks and mechanical devices on the 40'r. In a 35kt blow and rough seas my H28 with hank on sails needed one hand to hold on and the other to work...on the other hand my 42' cutter with roller furling and dedicated winches for everything was a non event in the same conditions. As a side note, 3 of us sailed a 90' Alden schooner in blustery conditions with green dollops coming over the bow. The mainsail was hoisted by a multiple pulley system and took all 3 to raise. Sheets handled by 1 and running backs needed 2 for the Highfield(sp?) levers. The manual anchor windless took 2 crew to stroke and another to hook it up to the deck hoist and swing on the deck.

    For my liking a 40' x 20k lb split marconi rig (no gaffs but would consider full battens) would be my comfort range for single handing in the next 10 yrs or so...Manual windless, roller furling with dedicated winches (geared) with wire to the furler for winding up (been there, done it and better than using a sheet winch), self tending sheet winches, slab/jiffy reefing, lazy jacks, down hauls for mains. Wouldn't do "lines back to the cockpit" again for any reason. I've found you still have to go on deck to tend sails and the lines make a lot of resistance hoisting and clutter that gets in the way. Had several boats this way and the results were always the same.

    Getting killed because you can't handle a seaworthy boat in a blow is more about poor seamanship than boat size.

  11. #116
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    Getting killed because you can't handle a seaworthy boat in a blow is more about poor seamanship than boat size.
    That is simply not true, plenty of good seaman have been killed by simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time and on larger boats the loads are huge increasing the risk exponentially. All singlehanders need to have contingency plans and systems in case of equipment failure, in addition once conditions deteriorate to a certain level any sailing vessel that is not totally optimised for single handing can become uncontrollable without crew.
    whatever rocks your boat

  12. #117
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Sounds like a good sail Andrew, and pretty clear confirmation that shes not a boat for singlehanding.

  13. #118
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul G. View Post
    That is simply not true, plenty of good seaman have been killed by simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time and on larger boats the loads are huge increasing the risk exponentially. All singlehanders need to have contingency plans and systems in case of equipment failure, in addition once conditions deteriorate to a certain level any sailing vessel that is not totally optimised for single handing can become uncontrollable without crew.
    well said Paul. What we are capable of doing in good and perfect conditions is far different than what we are safe to do in less than optimal ones. At 60 years of age or older, you should be able to manage your time windows with greater flexibility. Returning back to a comfortable boat size management discussion, why go beyond what is truly manageable, most comfortable, delivers competent speed and intentionally safest in the majority of situations?

    In a very pragmatic way, I would rather have a smaller 28’ comfortable boat to single hand because they are easier to manage. I dislike moving heavy sails and even more so by myself. The climbing of a mast to pop a jumped sheave isn’t as high on a smaller boat. It is far easier to install over sized rigging granting nicer safety margins. Simpler things like that I can accept a tow from a variety of vessels if stuck. I can scull into my slip the last several meters to make a slip if I need to. When I do weekend cruises out or more, it is far easier to find a slip or anchor out in a cove without hassle or greater attention. But in more realistic ways, I know most days I can push off in quick notice for a fine couples of hours and putting away the boat is significantly faster -both upsides to a go-it-alone sailor. The ability manage a smaller boat means - when you share the boat with others, it should far easier to sail and entertain - the two real reasons you have wanted the boat in the first place.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 08-05-2018 at 06:08 AM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  14. #119
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul G. View Post
    That is simply not true, plenty of good seaman have been killed by simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time and on larger boats the loads are huge increasing the risk exponentially. All singlehanders need to have contingency plans and systems in case of equipment failure, in addition once conditions deteriorate to a certain level any sailing vessel that is not totally optimised for single handing can become uncontrollable without crew.
    Yeah, ok, whatever. There are always exceptions...and sure, one can always claim to have good seamanship and sail a "not totally optimized" boat into the "wrong place at the wrong time" and lose boat or life. I guess using your definition of good seamanship it means I can sail an unprepared boat into a hurricane and consider it good seamanship...and place no blame on seamanship when the boat goes down. Have you weathered 40' seas in a hurricane offshore?

  15. #120
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Everything involves balance and compromise. A small boat has many advantages of low stress. Being light she can roll with the sea rather than break a cabin trunk in a boarding sea or lose the rig in a true knockdown. But a smaller boat can be really twitchy and uncomfortable bouncing about in even a moderate storm, leading to possibly dangerous fatigue.

    I liked sailing <25' MORC boats but a little tonnage, like more than ten, is more restful and so long as no sail is more that 750 square feet or so, and you've rigged intelligently, there should be no problems.

    Granuaile was 55', 20 tons, three masts, five sails and was quite easily handled by myself alone. LFH had designed the Marco Polo for short-handed sailing and I further refined controls for single-handing.

    Single handing does not always mean bringing all lines back to the cockpit. Sheets, of course. But if the boat is a stabile platform, you'll find it easier to have halyards and reefing lines at the masts.

  16. #121
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    obviously you can single hand a very big boat if you have enough mechanical advantage.....
    I would chose a smaller boat, not more than a small 40' or probably smaller than a larger 25' everything is of a manageable size here.
    Today's pick is the Presto 30

    Last edited by gilberj; 08-05-2018 at 04:17 PM.

  17. #122
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    Yeah, ok, whatever. There are always exceptions...and sure, one can always claim to have good seamanship and sail a "not totally optimized" boat into the "wrong place at the wrong time" and lose boat or life. I guess using your definition of good seamanship it means I can sail an unprepared boat into a hurricane and consider it good seamanship...and place no blame on seamanship when the boat goes down. Have you weathered 40' seas in a hurricane offshore?
    Four of us raced/sailed a modern and well equipped 40’ Beneteau yesterday. I was the youngest of the crew at 55. We sailed out under the golden gate in 10-12 kts of wind and sailed up to near Bolinas Bay to Duxberry reef about 24 miles north west of the bridge. The conditions changed is less than 20 munites. The wind and seas built and we all clipped in. As the gusts were growing - we were forced us had to reef in conditions where swells changed to waves - we were managing crashing waves over the deck over 15 feet and the white caps we being blowin off the tops. I was at the helm and our good and experienced bowman at 64 (who just retired the day before) went to the mast to deal with reefing lines. I worried about the bowman as he was nearly washed off the deck more than twice as waves crashed over the deck as we pinched the sails. As Lew took numerous waves as he worked the reef, I began to consider what we would do to retrieve him if he suffered a knocking or complete washing of the deck itself. Luckily, Lew stayed aboard, we reefed and even finished the 30 mile race with a respectable time.

    Keeping in the line of this thread.. If he or I had been singled handing the same boat - things would have been much more precarious and unsafe. I am unsure if the size of the vessel would have mattered. I do know the forces on reefing the sails on the bigger sailboat in challenging conditions like yesterday isn’t something I would opt for.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  18. #123
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    An update: I just spent 36 hours crewing on a friend’s Nicholson 55. It was interesting.

    We beat from the Solent to Plymouth against south westerlies between 28 knots and 5 knots, with a lot of 15-11 knots, in 33 hours, with a crew of 5, two of whom were my sons. The owner and a friend of his, both of whom are former RN submariners, were the real crew! We did put the engine on in the light bit past Portland when the tide was foul.

    Observations:

    First impression - “This thing has been built like a battleship” - including the damage control systems - what normal boat has five watertight compartments, a bilge manifold and weather tight doors to match, remote engine room fire systems and so on. The gear is all huge, much of it having been “rebuilt a bit stronger” over her 43 years of almost constant use as an HM Forces training vessel. But she has also been scrupulously maintained. Everything as it should be and where it should be, everything clean, nothing worn out.

    There were clear signs of “campaigns”; for instance one of the twelve sisters, “Lord Trenchard”, blew up because of a gas leak, seriously injuring one man. The gas detector now installed is quite a bit of kit..

    The engine is a Yanmar installed under the cockpit sole. Very quiet. Under power, she reliably stuck her stern into the wind in astern, and turned in quite a small space.

    Once under way she turns into a pussycat - with tigerish characteristics.

    She has a beautifully light, balanced, feel to the helm. Does not pull your arm out in any of the conditions we had, but does tell you, in no uncertain terms, what she wants! For instance, she wanted less draft in the mainsail, and she made that quite clear

    She heaves-to like a pilot cutter. Just sat there, heeling gently and making a square drift, like a big fat seagull, with no solid water on deck.

    The mainsail is loose footed with three big reefs. On the coach roof abaft the mast are three 42:1 two speeders for the topping lift, the kicker and the clew outhaul tackle inside the boom, and a damn great 53:1 self tailer for the reef pennants. The mainsail is not fully battened. It wasn’t hard to put in and shake out reefs, single handed, and the main and headsail halyards were not too hard for me.

    The bagged headsails are heavy. We didn’t use the big gennies but we used the #3 a lot. It can be carried up to 28knots and it has a tack line to keep it well clear of the deck. Tacking is a two man job with this sail. The jibs and staysails are easier, but still expletive deleted heavy!

    I think that if you sail her, as her owner does, and in his words, at about “60% rig power”, she is not too hard. At 95% power you need twelve gorillas. This increase in effort would give you one or two knots more on a passage.

    Her owner’s wish list is the same as NavyDave’s. Big power windlass, plumbed in autopilot, lazy jacks or Dutchman furling, more self tailers.

    Mine would include a rigid boom gallows. Her owner prefers a rigid kicker.

    Good headsail rolling would create another cabin, as you would only need to stow trysail, storm staysail and cruising chute. But in this size, good roller headsail reefing is “megabucks!”.

    ”In dreams”, electrically driven primary winches and headsail rolling would make her a complete pussycat.
    What a fun time. The conclusion being what we all expected though isn't it. I have a room filled with Riada's headsail and spinnaker wardrobe. #1, #2 spare#4, spare storm jib , light kite , heavy kite , mizzen spinnaker and some I've forgotten I'm sure . All of that replaced with the 5 to 50 knot #3 on the furler, a storm jib and trysail, a staysail and a mizzen staysail ( all pretty compact sails). Oh plus one dumpster carbon #4 tucked right up the back of the boat in case we blow the jib while away.
    One of my wish lists is to wangle a ride on Steinlager (the RTW maxi ketch)some time, we were out on the weekend and saw her setting sail and taking off. I even know someone who might help me with that dream.

    I'm loving that presto 30.
    Last edited by John B; 08-05-2018 at 05:40 PM.

  19. #124
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    Four of us raced/sailed a modern and well equipped 40í Beneteau yesterday.

    Snip

    Keeping in the line of this thread.. If he or I had been singled handing the same boat - things would have been much more precarious and unsafe. I am unsure if the size of the vessel would have mattered. I do know the forces on reefing the sails on the bigger sailboat in challenging conditions like yesterday isnít something I would opt for.
    When people are racing they tend to push it over the line. Someone singlehanding the boat is likely to have made different choices., including as the saying goes, reef early.

  20. #125
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    When people are racing they tend to push it over the line. Someone singlehanding the boat is likely to have made different choices., including as the saying goes, reef early.
    you don’t sail San Francisco/Northern California much do you? We weren’t pushing it. the conditions here are some of the most challenging. Being able to reef early is a luxury often times. How often do you reef first... I would think you don’t.. Discounting my story was typical of not knowing the bay. Furthermore - most people who sail the slot let the traveler out first then reef later.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 08-05-2018 at 07:17 PM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  21. #126
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    If you weren't pushing it you weren't racing.

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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Ah racing single-handed. I'd had crew for the "Hurricane Cup", a race from Hyannis to Nantucket. The return "Reverse Hurricane Cup" found me single handing as my crew took ferries home. Goblin was an Alden 43' staysail schooner. With all sails up I'd have a big main (750 sq ft) mainstaysail with big somewhat psychotic fisherman above, a forestaysail on a boom and a jib. So tacking to weather with all up meant handling the jib and fisherman sheets and the running back stays. Childs play comparing to gybing with all that.

    I began the race with a reefed main (for balance) and no fisherman. That I could short tack and gybe handily for prestart screwing with the opposition. After a short beat in which I lost considerable ground we bore off for a broad reach to Hyannis through thick fog. I shook the reef. I deployed the fisherman. I switched jibs to the genny. i pegged the log, which only read to 8 knots. Schooner weather. I poured a glass of the good and as we swept out of the fog passing one muscularly crewed IOR type fighting their 'chutes after another, I'd raise a lazy hand (to show off my drink) and vanish into the fog ahead. We looked pretty cool with the lee rail well under and water breaking on the trunk. I always loved the feathers of spray from the two foremast and three mainmast shrouds.

    As we blasted past Point Gammon I began to wonder how I'd stop before running up on the hard brown stuff around the edges. The seas had gotten a bit boisterous and I rather dreaded trying to heave-to and get some sail down before washing up on the beach. So we swept through the channel with two very strange gybes as I left the jib till after getting the main safely over with the running backstays handled, and left the fisherman till after that. But we made it past Egg Island, where I rounded up and let her smack the sandbar, coming to a happy stop while I struck the sails.

    The lesson is that one may take some risks on what's only a thirty mile race in well understood conditions.

  23. #128
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    If you weren't pushing it you weren't racing.
    If you are not trying to sail fast and safety as well as you can... you are a poor or lazy sailor.

    i don’t see why you have a hard time acknowledging that smaller yachts with smaller sails are safer. In the late 70s and 80s, the trend was for smaller masts with smaller mains so people could manage thier vessels easier while short handed. Now those issues are dealt with in complex systems and electric mechanical advantages to help deal with larger main sails and head furlers - they work until they don’t. Being older does add to the problem of dealing with the mechanical failure and is far harder to clear.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 08-05-2018 at 09:38 PM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  24. #129
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Where do you come up with any of this?

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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Channeling Ian's story , a few years ago I did 100 miler 2 handed race in Riada. It started out with enough wind that it was a displacement race and we hung with the fast boats because they couldn't burst away like normal. It did breeze up for abit around one of the gulf islands because I held the kite too long and got knocked down. Once we sorted that out though , it became a beat to weather on 2 or 3 long tacks for about say 35 miles . What we'd passed caught up, what we'd been catching sailed away.
    But finally in the pitch dark at midnight or 1 we rounded that top' mark' and bore away for a 25 mile reach. Up with the mizzen staysail and the gennaker and we fell into a ketchy groove seldom seen before or since by this helmsman. We could do nothing wrong , it was light and we did hull speed, we rounded an island and the wind shifted with us. we overtook probably 5 or 7 really quite racy boats gasping away, but I talk it up to 10 or 12 to this day.They were desperately listening for the sound of an iron topsail. ( 'you went past us like you were motoring') We might have even won it , I know we got 2nd or 3rd in the series and there's a tin mug on the trophy shelf.

    It was glorious. also I have pitchas.
    running down the first 30 miles or so, heavy #2 kite I see.


    one of the beats in the middle



    middle of the night stealth overtake mode .


    Those were the days.
    Last edited by John B; 08-05-2018 at 11:04 PM.

  26. #131
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Fun and interesting stories both.

  27. #132
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Where do you come up with any of this?
    I hold a few commercial maritime licenses, been sailing since 3 years old, come from a maritime family, sailed on hundred of boats for work and pleasure. Am quite active in my sailing community. I have rescued more than a few people over the years who were over thier head and now in my 50’s am beginning to recognize my own physical and mental limitations.

    Given a chance, I do like to study boat design (take a look at Bob Perry’s Baba 35, the rational behind the H28 and other great blue water cruisers that make great family/short handed sailboat). Often when I can I go to talks at the SSS (Singlehanded Sailing Society) here in San Francisco Bay. Besides reading the Classics on Sensible cruising... there are some really good books on the subject.

    here are some books I would recommend for you to read.




    Singlehanded Sailing Tips Book (3rd ed.) by Andy Evans
    (free .pdf download at the link, or buy Kindle or hardcopy at Amazon)




    Black Feathers: A Pocket Racer Sails The Singlehanded TransPac
    by Robert Crawford (purchase on amazon)



    The Floating Harpsichord: One Sailor’s Log and Manuals for Solo-Sailing and Solo-Medicine by Peter H. Strykers (purchase on amazon)



    Not A Yacht Club: The Singlehanded Sailing Society by Jackie Philpott (purchase on amazon)



    Lee Shore Blues: Sex, Drugs and Bluewater Sailing by Peter M. Heiberg (purchase on amazon)
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 08-06-2018 at 01:42 AM. Reason: grammer
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  28. #133
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    Default

    A couple of women, humour me here, let's just say their physical strength might be comparable to an older man, have recently sailed singlehanded around the world or around Antarctica. Some in smaller boats and some in bigger. Lisa Blair lost her mast south of Africa, and instead of hitting the epirb set up a jury rig and got herself into cape town. I think it's all about what the boat is set up for. But s bigger heavier boat is likely to stand up to a blow better and have a kinder motion in ordinary weather.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  29. #134
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Ted, I wasn't asking you for your advice or guidance, I normally direct that effort to people that are coherent.

  30. #135
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    A couple of women, humour me here, let's just say their physical strength might be comparable to an older man, have recently sailed singlehanded around the world or around Antarctica. Some in smaller boats and some in bigger. Lisa Blair lost her mast south of Africa, and instead of hitting the epirb set up a jury rig and got herself into cape town. I think it's all about what the boat is set up for. But s bigger heavier boat is likely to stand up to a blow better and have a kinder motion in ordinary weather.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Big and heavy up to a point, but eventually it becomes too much for one person. Moitessier later reflected that Joshua was really too big. Of course, from an outsider's perspective, that didn't seem to hinder him one bit.

  31. #136
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Ted, I wasn't asking you for your advice or guidance, I normally direct that effort to people that are coherent.
    I normally converse with a kinder set. It is disappointing the way you may try to discount it... the information I put forth comes from respected sources. Sorry you felt compelled to degrade the poster rather than materials presented. it shows you own lack of good character, your ignorance on the subject and maybe your unwillingness to expand your own knowledge.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 08-06-2018 at 09:12 AM.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  32. #137
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I like this video of a H28 in 30kts.

    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  33. #138
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    I can reflect back on a few yrs of sailing and generally (except for rare exceptions someone will dredge up) speaking my experience doesn't reflect sail handling on small boats is safer nor the boat more seaworthy than a large boat. Unless the claim is about fair weather and weekend warrior stuff where anything works. The comfort level and ability to move around the deck, handle sails, etc, favors a 40'r over a 30'r more often than not. Like I posted earlier, H28 getting tossed about while broad reaching with working jib and mizzen, having to hold on with one arm wrapped around the mizzen...tiller in other hand, much discomfort and restricted ability to go fwd to strike the jib. Same conditions...the 42' cutter double reefed with small storm jib and riding nicely...minimal discomfort, kicked back, tiller in one hand and enjoying the ride. Night and day difference favoring the 42'r with 2x displacement and 2x sail area.

  34. #139
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    I like this video of a H28 in 30kts.

    An H28 ketch is one of my favored boats, I had one several yrs and spent a yr in the Bahamas on it...but as a comparison to the video, I sailed in 30+ kts on the Bahama banks in mine and the video looks like mil pond conditions in comparison. Out of sight of land, 15' deep with cross currents and steep chop...no beating and no lounging around. Deep water gave results like the video. Thanks for the video, it brings back fond memories.

  35. #140
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    Default Re: What is the upper size limit for singlehanding, for someone in his sixties?

    There isn't a single answer regarding size as far as I can determine. The issue is how well is the boat equipped to allow single handed sailing, and docking in adverse conditions. A big boat with bow thrusters might be easier to handle at the fuel dock than something smaller. My neighbor in the marina told me he was on Jimmy Buffett's boat under construction. It had electric and hydraulic controls for everything from the cockpit. No need to go on deck except to dock.

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