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Thread: bicycles, an industrial design thread

  1. #36
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    That I like.


  2. #37
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    again, from the same company, this looks like something the old jcsoh* would ride










    * the new so cal joe rides a vespa, in flipflops
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    again, from the same company, this looks like something the old jcsoh* would ride








    * the new so cal joe rides a vespa, in flipflops
    That’s two different bikes, eh. Those campy wheels are poop. So are mavic wheels. Unless you enjoy buying skateboard bearings and freehub bodies. Ahem.
    Also, that flash gold cable housing is no es bueno.
    Campy 11, and that frame, however are sweet. And, that white saddle is bike pron.

    The middle bike buckled my knees with those high flange hubs.

    Peace,
    Robert

  4. #39
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    just for you rob

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread


    For Paul.

    Peace,
    Robert

  6. #41
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread


    Quote Originally Posted by leikec View Post
    One of my great regrets is never riding one of these. One of my blessings is that I never rode one of these, as I still have most of my teeth, and a face that hasn't been haphazardly rearranged...
    I have ridden one of those, quite a bit at one point. Once you get used to it, it isn't hard. And the risk of 'taking a header' is less than you think, as long as you're not trying to go fast - and I sure as hell never did. It was also pretty flat country, which helped.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  7. #42
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post

    I have ridden one of those, quite a bit at one point. Once you get used to it, it isn't hard. And the risk of 'taking a header' is less than you think, as long as you're not trying to go fast - and I sure as hell never did. It was also pretty flat country, which helped.
    In this instance I'll trust without verification, my brother!

    Jeff C

  8. #43
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    I never fell off. I did get bitten by a dog once while riding a high wheel bike. He came dashing out from behind a house barking like mad, saw the biggest bike he'd ever seen, and I guess just couldn't resist. Ah, youth and foolishness. The original old ones usually had a 'spoon brake' that rubbed on the front tire; the one in the picture has a conventional brake on the rear wheel. The one I rode had no brakes at all.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  9. #44
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    For me.






  10. #45
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    I never fell off. I did get bitten by a dog once while riding a high wheel bike. He came dashing out from behind a house barking like mad, saw the biggest bike he'd ever seen, and I guess just couldn't resist. Ah, youth and foolishness. The original old ones usually had a 'spoon brake' that rubbed on the front tire; the one in the picture has a conventional brake on the rear wheel. The one I rode had no brakes at all.
    How stable did you feel when riding along?
    Enjoy a good rum on the rocks at sunset.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    The OP photo looks like it would have the stiffness of a wet noodle to ride. I've ridden many cutting edge frames and it's hard to beat the double diamond for stiffness and power transfer to the rear wheel.

    Chris Boardman's Lotus type 108 designed carbon fiber was kinda cool and stiff, but it was heavy as hell The frame is an advanced aerofoil cross-section using a carbon composite monocoque.




    Such radical shaping unfortunately is currently outlawed by cycling's governing body, the UCI
    The man who made the monoblade front fork sometimes jogs past my house.Because of the insistence of the designer to keep the monoblade and the inherent flexibility of such a concept,it consisted of more than fifty plies of carbon cloth.I have no doubt that a conventional design could have been a fair bit lighter.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    My man! He was done SO dirty.

    Peace,
    Robert

  14. #49
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Bicycle design will never surpass the Schwinn Stingray I had in the 1960's

    Elect a clown expect a circus

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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    In my teens always wanted a curly frame Hetchins- had to settle for a Dawes.

  16. #51
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy W View Post
    For me.





    I assembled one much like this for a person. Iíd rather a DeRosa or Masi, thank you.

    Peace,
    Robert

  17. #52
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Round the world on a penny farthing
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUbrh0Ac29M

    and something more fitting for a wooden boat forum

  18. #53
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Some days you need a little more style than speed.

    blue 2014 New Belgium Brewery cruiser, the other is a 2010.
    Disbelief in magic can force a poor soul into believing in government and business.
    TOM ROBBINS, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues



  19. #54
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Re high-wheel bicycles:

    Quote Originally Posted by Rum_Pirate View Post
    How stable did you feel when riding along?
    Not bad at all. It really is easier than it looks, and it's kind of fun to be up that high. I was mostly on pretty flat ground and decent roads, though, and not trying to go fast at all.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  20. #55
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    The stuff I'm finding really interesting at the moment isn't the frame design, but the drive train. All my bikes are now 1x, 8spd for the belt drive commuter (although I rarely ride that now), 1x9 for the old MTB, 1x10 for the even older rigid MTB that has become my daily commuter, and 1x11 for the cross/gravel bike.

    Here's some contenders for the future of the bicycle drive train:

    14-speed Rohloff hub gears with Gates carbon belt drive


    Pinion 18-speed bottom-bracket mounted gearbox:



    Rotor 13-speed with hydraulic derailleur:


    Ceramic Speed 13-speed 'flat cassette with carbon drive shaft:
    'When I leave I don't know what I'm hoping to find. When I leave I don't know what I'm leaving behind...'

  21. #56
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Been dreaming of a bottom bracket gearbox for years, rear mechs and wide rear cassettes make for weak wheels and its a stupid place for the delicate gear change in the mud and junk, shimano etc really need to get a move on with it. Much easier to isolate the drive chain from suspension as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    The stuff I'm finding really interesting at the moment isn't the frame design, but the drive train. All my bikes are now 1x, 8spd for the belt drive commuter (although I rarely ride that now), 1x9 for the old MTB, 1x10 for the even older rigid MTB that has become my daily commuter, and 1x11 for the cross/gravel bike.

    Here's some contenders for the future of the bicycle drive train:

    14-speed Rohloff hub gears with Gates carbon belt drive


    Pinion 18-speed bottom-bracket mounted gearbox:



    Rotor 13-speed with hydraulic derailleur:


    Ceramic Speed 13-speed 'flat cassette with carbon drive shaft:

  22. #57
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    My man! He was done SO dirty.

    Peace,
    Robert
    Rob, watch this if you haven't already, it's really quite fascinating.

    'When I leave I don't know what I'm hoping to find. When I leave I don't know what I'm leaving behind...'

  23. #58
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    Rob, watch this if you haven't already, it's really quite fascinating.

    That was great, thank you. I was always a big fan of Graeme Obree
    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

  24. #59
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    Rob, watch this if you haven't already, it's really quite fascinating.

    Sweet. I have done my share of time trial and triathlon. I donít know about no 30 miles an hour for an hour, but I have averaged 19 mph for 112 miles.
    After swimming 2.4 miles, and right before I ran a marathon.

    Graeme was a honch, period. Any speed advantage from the crouch is lost in holding the crouch and maintaining your line. Smooth is fast.
    I remember Boardman adopted the Superman, too.

    Peace,
    Robert

  25. #60
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    Rob, watch this if you haven't already, it's really quite fascinating.

    thx, cool

  26. #61
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    This thread needs some recumbents this one has some wood http://www.instructables.com/id/Pencil-Bike/ pencil bike.jpg

    and this one is just cool Super_Chopper-1.jpg
    If growth is good then how much is enough

  27. #62
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    The problem with recumbents is you are too low...its hard enough to be seen by the average phone using tin box driver on a normal bicycle, I fear you'd be flattened.
    'C'est la vie' say the old folks it goes to show you never can tell

  28. #63
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by artif View Post
    Been dreaming of a bottom bracket gearbox for years, rear mechs and wide rear cassettes make for weak wheels and its a stupid place for the delicate gear change in the mud and junk, shimano etc really need to get a move on with it. Much easier to isolate the drive chain from suspension as well.
    to eliminate those pesky rear wheel rear derailleur maintenance and reliability issues. . .

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    There's an excellent reason that cable-actuated derailleurs have been almost universal for 50 years. It's very hard to beat the combination of efficiency, simplicity, relatively low cost, and lots of ratios. There are some disadvantages - too many sprockets do give you a badly offset wheel, they're vulnerable to dirt and physical damage, and you can't shift while stopped, but all of the alternatives I've seen so far have at least as many problems, usually more. Mini-gears are very complicated, expensive, and quite hard to make nearly as efficient as a chain (and I was rebuilding Sturmey-Archer five-speed planetary hubs in the '70s). That contraption at the end of post #55 is clever and looks elegant, but even with the ball-bearing pinion I expect you'd get some losses (and a bicycle can't afford it), and you also have to deal with the thrust loads along the wheel axis. And that nest of gears looks like a flesh-shredder if you get anywhere near - although you could probably cover it.

    Anyway, I'm very glad my job isn't coming up with a better alternative bicycle drive system. Too many constraints.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  30. #65
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread



    or, if you prefer front wheel drive

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  31. #66
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Rohloff hubs are near legendary in their reliability, but all that un-sprung weight on a full susser doesn't make sense, much better to have the gears low down in the centre of the bike, also opens up the option of 2 wheel drive systems that don't require drive from the rear wheel, as you may have worked out my interest lies in off-road bikes, no stiff-backs in this house : )
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    There's an excellent reason that cable-actuated derailleurs have been almost universal for 50 years. It's very hard to beat the combination of efficiency, simplicity, relatively low cost, and lots of ratios. There are some disadvantages - too many sprockets do give you a badly offset wheel, they're vulnerable to dirt and physical damage, and you can't shift while stopped, but all of the alternatives I've seen so far have at least as many problems, usually more. Mini-gears are very complicated, expensive, and quite hard to make nearly as efficient as a chain (and I was rebuilding Sturmey-Archer five-speed planetary hubs in the '70s). That contraption at the end of post #55 is clever and looks elegant, but even with the ball-bearing pinion I expect you'd get some losses (and a bicycle can't afford it), and you also have to deal with the thrust loads along the wheel axis. And that nest of gears looks like a flesh-shredder if you get anywhere near - although you could probably cover it.

    Anyway, I'm very glad my job isn't coming up with a better alternative bicycle drive system. Too many constraints.

  32. #67
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    Bicycle design will never surpass the Schwinn Stingray I had in the 1960's

    Marvelous bikes, indeed. At about age 10, I lost one attempting to ride on water...
    David G
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    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  33. #68
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    Bicycle design will never surpass the Schwinn Stingray I had in the 1960's

    Mine was green with white pinstripe, the saddle was white with happy faces. I didn't have the 3 speed though, that was for the rich kids.
    Nosce te ipsum

  34. #69
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Quote Originally Posted by artif View Post
    Round the world on a penny farthing
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUbrh0Ac29M

    and something more fitting for a wooden boat forum
    This one reminded me of the several builders of wood frames here locally. As a woodworker, I'm partial to such, of course.

    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  35. #70
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    Default Re: bicycles, an industrial design thread

    Rohloff hubs are near legendary in their reliability
    Definitely an impressive piece of work. Also $1300 and up. And I expect that neither weight nor efficiency are nearly as good as a derailleur. They have other advantages, of course.

    That's what I mean about it being a hard problem. You want low weight, power-transmission efficiency, reliability, a wide range of ratios, lots of steps (or better yet, continuously-variable), ease of use, and low cost. You can improve some of the factors at the expense of others - Rohloff gives you reliability and ease of use at the expense of weight and cost, possibly efficiency - but improving all of them is damn near impossible , and getting a better balance than a derailleur is hard.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

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