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Thread: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

  1. #1

    Default Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Who has built this design? I happened upon this design today while surfing the internet and this is a really neat design.

    I've only recently been learning about lofting. So far, I've lofted one boat for learning only. The plans for this design requires lofting, which I like. I'd like to know about other people's experiences that have lofted this boat design.

    I'm also curious about how this boat performs. I'm not much of a sailor either but I could see where this design would be great for exploring sheltered bays along the Gulf coast, or trailering around to different lakes for exploring and camping.

    Is the boat suitable for building upside down and carvel planking? Difficulty scale?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Do you mean Eel?


    Garden Eel3.jpg
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Yes. Tell me about it.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    I can't answer your original questions George but it could certainly be built glued lap , a popular method and the one I used for my similar sized boat.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    I fell in love with Eel and bought the plans a few years ago, with the thought of building one some day. Every now and then, I unroll the plans just to admire the design. In response to your questions:

    "Is the boat suitable for building upside down and carvel planking?" Yes to both questions. The boat is built upside down on two low horses; the construction method features harpins, wide shelves of 3/4" ply that are erected on the horses and serve as the structural foundation to build the rest of the hull. Garden doesn't go into detail on this but you can find information online. The plans show options and construction details for carvel, triple diagonal (cold molded), and strip construction.

    "I'm also curious about how this boat performs." One boat, Owl, was professionally built in Washington and cruised up the Inside Passage to Alaska. Despite the shallow, trailerable draft, Eel is capable of doing some serious sailing. You can build with either inside or outside lead ballast. It should meet your requirements just fine. Garden and his work are held in high regard but, with nothing else said about that, you can just tell from the sweet lines what a delight Eel will be in every way, on or off her mooring, dock, or trailer.

    "The plans for this design requires lofting, which I like. I'd like to know about other people's experiences that have lofted this boat design." So would I! While everything else looks straightforward to loft, the harpin raises some questions and getting this foundation wrong could put the whole rest of the boat badly off. The harpin is shown in plan on sheet 2. It's both long and wide. It will certainly need to be lofted to account lengthwise for the sheer. The question is, will it also need to be lofted and set up in breadth to account for the deck camber, or is that factor negligible? If it has to be lofted both ways, developing the correct shape for layout on flat ply could be a pretty bit of work. Nothing I've found in Garden's writing or elsewhere sheds light on this question. It seems to be something the professional builder is just supposed to know, although building on harpins is said to be a simplified method of construction.

    John

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    For further detail, you might contact Schooner Creek, in Portland Oregon. They built several, though I believe theirs were all cold-molded.
    David G
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    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    For further detail, you might contact Schooner Creek, in Portland Oregon. They built several, though I believe theirs were all cold-molded.
    Thanks for nudging my memory. The boat name was Otter not Owl and Schooner Creek built it. Cruising World ran an article by the owner, in the July 1983 issue, titled "North to Alaska: An Eel called Otter makes a 900 mile passage home to Juneau."

  8. #8

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by John Clark View Post
    I fell in love with Eel and bought the plans a few years ago, with the thought of building one some day. Every now and then, I unroll the plans just to admire the design. In response to your questions:

    "Is the boat suitable for building upside down and carvel planking?" Yes to both questions. The boat is built upside down on two low horses; the construction method features harpins, wide shelves of 3/4" ply that are erected on the horses and serve as the structural foundation to build the rest of the hull. Garden doesn't go into detail on this but you can find information online. The plans show options and construction details for carvel, triple diagonal (cold molded), and strip construction.

    "I'm also curious about how this boat performs." One boat, Owl, was professionally built in Washington and cruised up the Inside Passage to Alaska. Despite the shallow, trailerable draft, Eel is capable of doing some serious sailing. You can build with either inside or outside lead ballast. It should meet your requirements just fine. Garden and his work are held in high regard but, with nothing else said about that, you can just tell from the sweet lines what a delight Eel will be in every way, on or off her mooring, dock, or trailer.

    "The plans for this design requires lofting, which I like. I'd like to know about other people's experiences that have lofted this boat design." So would I! While everything else looks straightforward to loft, the harpin raises some questions and getting this foundation wrong could put the whole rest of the boat badly off. The harpin is shown in plan on sheet 2. It's both long and wide. It will certainly need to be lofted to account lengthwise for the sheer. The question is, will it also need to be lofted and set up in breadth to account for the deck camber, or is that factor negligible? If it has to be lofted both ways, developing the correct shape for layout on flat ply could be a pretty bit of work. Nothing I've found in Garden's writing or elsewhere sheds light on this question. It seems to be something the professional builder is just supposed to know, although building on harpins is said to be a simplified method of construction.

    John
    John, thanks for the feedback. I went ahead and ordered the plans today. I really look forward to the lofting challenges the boat may present me with that I haven't had to deal with before since I'm new to all this. And I'm curious about the "hairpin" you were talking about.

    That's cool about the guy who sailed up the Inside Passage to Alaska. I bet that was a really special adventure. I've dreamed of going cruising in a small boat and that patch of water it at the top of my list. I'll have to look that article up.

    Get those plans out and get to work on it!

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    For further detail, you might contact Schooner Creek, in Portland Oregon. They built several, though I believe theirs were all cold-molded.
    Strip planked, as I recall. But Steve sold Schooner Creek a while back, so I'm not sure if anyone there still recalls the builds. You still see them up at PTWBF now and then.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    I built 4 or 5 “Eels” in carvel plank and wedge seam construction many years ago in Tacoma and Gig Harbor, no cabin, just a spacious cockpit, per the original design.
    Lofting out the harpin is very much like doing a curved, raked transom, you have expand the stations to get the true distance from the Profile Plan, as the Plan view is not the correct distance between stations, the hairpin also has the added fun and games of not being parallel to the waterline, but rather follows the arc of the deck beams.
    The harpin provides a very solid lock on the shape of the sheer in both views, the bent frames are notched into it, and it provides solid backing for the decking. It was used in the NW yards in vessels up to at least 110 feet ( Bill Garden’s ‘Kakki M’).
    I would loft the harpin and pickup the shape onto plywood, the clamp this pattern onto your station molds, make sure you cut the mold cross spall to include the deck beam angle, and then prove your lofting before cutting your timber.
    Oh, and don’t forget to pick up your bevels on the outboard face of the harpin, since this hull has both flair and tumble home, there will will be both under bevels and standing bevels to layout, cut and plane.
    Last edited by Paul Schweiss; 07-05-2018 at 06:52 PM.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    I did not build my Eel, it was built by Gordon Swift in New Hampshire (2000). Strip planked with Spanish Cedar.

    My home port is St Petersburg on Florida's West Coast, and is a great boat for coastal cruising.

    The rudder will require some creative redesign for shoal water sailing, as Garden's design is for a deep rudder that lifts up in a trunk for trailering. A lot of boats are built with a sharpie style rudder like the lapstrake version shown above. Mine has a kick-up bronze rudder that works well.

    2-21-2014 2 by M Jones J Powers, on Flickbr />




    SSS 4-2018 by M Jones J Powers, on Flickbr /> I built a new top this year that is hinged forward, an option shown in the plans.

    panther key Jan-2018 by M Jones J Powers, on Flickbr />Resting on shore at low tide, with the rudder kicked up. Hang out around the fire till the tide rises, and then swing out to anchor for the night. Panther Key in the 10,000 islands.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    the original Eel, by Holmes


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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    got to admit I borrowed Eel's relatively modern centerboard design/profile for my version of the 1876 Trans Atlantic dory, Centennial.


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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    The article and back issues of Cruising World are on Google Books. You can search for it online. If you want to read Garden's chapter on Eel in Yacht Designs, you'll have to go to a library. Interestingly, another WB forum thread from 2001 states that Otter changed hands and the new owner sailed her back down again, the other way.

    In that same thread, forum member "thurman" wrote: "I am planning on lofting Garden's Eel soon. I am puzzled by what Garden says about setting her up. In Yacht Designs, page 29: ' Build her upside down on low horses set to the sheer sweep. The sheer harpin should be laid out on the floor, allowing for the greater length to be measured along the sweep of the sheer. Fabricate this harpin and deck structure, then lay it upside down on the horses, fit the deck beams, and set up the molds on 245-inch [sic] centers as shown.' In sheet No. 5, Framing Details, he simply shows the harpin being bolted to a 2x6, then to the shop floor." As thurman writes, Garden's description differs from what the plans show.

    The 2X6s are square to the floor and beveled at the other end to the angle of the deck beams, which is more than a little, not parallel to the waterline. When you draw the harpin down to the 2X6s, it will be forced into a compound curve that evidently does call for careful lofting and thoughtful, premeditated setup, contrary to the impression of casual setup you might get from Yacht Designs.

    That old thread petered out with no answer to the critical lofting question, until Paul Schweiss's reply to this thread today cleared it up in detail, step by step. Paul confirms that the harpin needs to be fully developed and carefully checked before cutting, like a curved transom. Thank you, kind sir -- now I can see how to build this!

    The inside face of the harpin makes a joint with the cabin trunk and coaming. I've seen one photo essay on a blog, where the builder laid the harpin in after turning the molded hull over. However you build it, you'll want the fits as close as your combined lofting and joinery skill can make them.

    As a further note, Schooner Creek didn't follow the plans for the cabin trunk but steam-bent it in oak, to a lovely curve that perfectly suits the oval portlights. As the long-ago racing/cruising skipper of a Dark Harbor 17, that's how I'd choose to build Eel too, if I had the bending skills and shop space for a big enough steam box.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by John Clark View Post
    As a further note, Schooner Creek didn't follow the plans for the cabin trunk but steam-bent it in oak, to a lovely curve that perfectly suits the oval portlights. As the long-ago racing/cruising skipper of a Dark Harbor 17, that's how I'd choose to build Eel too, if I had the bending skills and shop space for a big enough steam box.
    interesting as Holmes original Eel and his drawings seem to have indicated curved/steam bent cabin sides forward as well.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    if I had the bending skills and shop space for a big enough steam box.
    My sloop, Bucephalus, started life with just such a curved, steam-bent oak cabin trunk. Unfortunately, there's a lot of movement in oak, and the side of the cabin trunk eventually checked as the boat came with me through various adventures in different climates of differing humidity. A couple years ago I replaced the steam-bent oak with four layers, laminated, of 1/8" sapele veneer. Bent to the same curve, it is to all appearances identical to the original. Anyone considering such a curved trunk might do well to consider it as a good place for a lamination, or at least a place to use oak very cautiously.

    The Eel design is simply lovely. The Eel "Dawn Treader" lived in Bucephalus's home marina last year (she's now at a nearby marina) and I was completely smitten. If I didn't have Bucephalus, I'd have an Eel.

    Alex

  17. #17

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Guys, the feedback on this thread has gotten me frothing at the mouth for my own little Eel to go sailing and exploring on. There's also some photos of an Eel, including some construction photos, at the Flickr link I posed below. They omitted the portholes though. But I really like the rest of the look for the boat.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/dahlbe...7625307156931/

    I noticed that people build this design differently. Are those modifications shown as options in the plans? I have a set ordered but they won't be here until next week. I've never built a boat and really only got a renewed interest in boat building. So far, I've just been learning to loft, which has been really helpful to learn about boat design. I've had a few books that I've read off and on for years about boat building so I've got that "learning" to help me. But, I really do think I want to build this design. My biggest hurdle will be negotiating with my wife so that I can turn the garage into a boat building shop, and to complete her list of tasks I'll probably have to do first. But I could see this boat being a lot of fun to haul to different lakes to explore and camp with. My daughter is 10 years old and I bet when she's older she'd probably want to take over the boat to use with her friends.

    How easy is it to launch this boat? I'd mostly be sailing in lakes that would range from muddy bottoms to rocky lakes with steep shore lines.

    Also, having said I plan to use it for camping and to explore in a variety of different conditions, I want to get some recommendations on accommodations to build into the boat for that. What's the cuddy cabin like? For camping, how is it finished out? My hull would be carvel planked and mostly painted, but I want some recommendations on how to make it look attractive with some varnished woodwork also. I really like the looks of the boat in the Flickr link I posted but with portholes. And how do you keep it afloat if it capsizes? I also don't want to keep a motor on board. Is that feasible, or even safe? Can the cockpit be arranged to sleep on for camping? What is the cost of sails and where to buy them, and the rigging tackle? Are accommodations needed in the construction of the boat is this boat is to be beached often?

    How easy is it to singlehand this boat?
    Last edited by George Ferguson; 07-06-2018 at 09:53 AM.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    have to mention a restoration done by Marty Loken a year or so ago...…….

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  19. #19

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    2dogsnight, that looks nice and roomy. I'd noticed in a picture of your boat already that the sides of the cabin were brought out with the side of the boat, and I wondered how that affected the inside.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    I want some recommendations on how to make it look attractive with some varnished woodwork also.
    Prettiest yacht interior I ever saw was mostly white paint with varnished ash accents. Everything was very light; no claustrophobia.

    I also don't want to keep a motor on board. Is that feasible, or even safe?
    I wouldn't bother with a motor unless you couldn't do without one. Use oars, if it comes to it. That general design was around a long time before there were practical motors! My 19'/3000# deep-keel sloop, Bucephalus, has no motor, I use 9-1/2' oars.

    What is the cost of sails and where to buy them, and the rigging tackle?
    Sails and hardware are items that you can almost spend as much or as little as you like. Budget sails: talk to Sailrite, have them put together a kit, and you can sew them yourself. Budget blocks: there are numerous threads on the Forum for building your own. A little ingenuity goes a long way, on a tight budget. And with those baselines, the sky and your bank account are the limiting factors.

    You'd better start a build thread --this is getting me excited, too!

    Alex

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by George Ferguson View Post
    2dogsnight, that looks nice and roomy. I'd noticed in a picture of your boat already that the sides of the cabin were brought out with the side of the boat, and I wondered how that affected the inside.
    George, this is not my boat - sorry for not stating it clearly - Marty was posting some pictures of rebuild on his Facebook page I believe.

    Wojo
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    1985 Glen L15 - 1980 Johnson 7.5 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  22. #22

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Have ya'll seen these photos? I know it's not Eel but it's a pretty canoe yawl. Be sure to look for the construction pictures. That's what I was looking for when I found these photos online.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/dickw/albums/with/165297

    I wonder if this guy is a member on here?

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    I've built an Eel. You can see it in the December2017 Small Boat Monthly
    I love this boat. Everyone who has seen it or sailed in it thinks that it is wonderful. Performs great.
    Mine is built strip planked upside down. Built it on molds, not a harpin, then added decking after I turned it over. Worked well for me
    I didn't find lofting it too hard even tho I had little previous experience with it. Helps if you are obsessional, as I am. It doesn't have a transom which I found intimidating to loft so I was willing to try it.
    Be good to have another Eel in the world

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/dickw/albums/with/165297

    I wonder if this guy is a member on here?
    He is: http://forum.woodenboat.com/member.php?9019-Dick-Wynne

    He's also a really good guy, which makes me feel better about lusting after his boat(s).

    Alex

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by George Ferguson View Post
    Have ya'll seen these photos? I know it's not Eel but it's a pretty canoe yawl. Be sure to look for the construction pictures. That's what I was looking for when I found these photos online.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/dickw/albums/with/165297

    I wonder if this guy is a member on here?
    Yes he is... http://canoeyawl.org/

    I have another Wenda http://www.canoeyawl.com

  26. #26

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by RandyColker View Post
    I've built an Eel. You can see it in the December2017 Small Boat Monthly
    I love this boat. Everyone who has seen it or sailed in it thinks that it is wonderful. Performs great.
    Mine is built strip planked upside down. Built it on molds, not a harpin, then added decking after I turned it over. Worked well for me
    I didn't find lofting it too hard even tho I had little previous experience with it. Helps if you are obsessional, as I am. It doesn't have a transom which I found intimidating to loft so I was willing to try it.
    Be good to have another Eel in the world
    Randy, I've read your article. And your Eel is really, really a good looking boat! That's cool that you responded to this thread. I think your article and the one by Bruce Baker of his trip taking his boat home to Alaska, have inspired me as much as anything to build an Eel. What kind of wood did you use in your boat? The way yours looks is just how I want mine to be.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Yes he is... http://canoeyawl.org/

    I have another Wenda http://www.canoeyawl.com
    Cool! I really enjoy looking at the construction photos too! Thanks for sharing.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Thanks
    The hull strips are white cedar, cabin and coamings are half inch okoume plywood, trim is mahogany, samson post, deadwood and other structural members are angelique which I scavenged from left overs from build of schooner Virginia, apron and ribs are oak
    Lofting the harpin sounds tricky. You can avoid that by building the boat on a strong back and station molds

  29. #29

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by RandyColker View Post
    Thanks
    The hull strips are white cedar, cabin and coamings are half inch okoume plywood, trim is mahogany, samson post, deadwood and other structural members are angelique which I scavenged from left overs from build of schooner Virginia, apron and ribs are oak
    Lofting the harpin sounds tricky. You can avoid that by building the boat on a strong back and station molds
    I just got a real treat about a couple of hours ago. My plans came in and I wasn't expecting them until next week!

    The lines are simple but the plans have a lot of details. Although, the handwriting is not great and there is a lot of abbreviation. You can tell that Mr. Garden was a very creative thinker and his drawings were sketches of pictures in his mind instead of neatly organized drawings with very uniform text that you typically see in plans drawings. That's actually kind of cool though. I deal with drawings in the housing and commercial construction industry every day and it's interesting to see occasional drawings come across like this sometimes.

    I haven't really studied the plans very much since I've only had them for a couple of hours but the harpin that you mention is different from anything I've seen in any of the books I've read on boatbuilding. To be set up that way looks like it would be tedious to do but when you were finished working on the hull upside down, I'm assuming you just detach the harpin from the base/stand, flip the boat over with the molds still inside, and disassemble the molds to get them out when you are ready to remove them after having done whatever other work you want do while leaving the molds inside. I could see where leaving the molds in the boat when flipping over would help to preserve the shape. With the tumblehome that's in this boat, the hull couldn't just be lifted up off the molds anyhow. And are the trunks installed after the hull is flipped back right side up? The sections at the keel are for strip plank but one detail on another sheet implies that the keel plank (what he's calling the apron) is shaped differently when the boat is carvel planked like I will be doing. And I didn't notice any dimensions or specs for the elevation height of the floor timbers.

    I can tell I am going to be using this forum for help on this boat. All comments are welcome! Just don't pick on me. I'm new at this.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Quote Originally Posted by George Ferguson View Post
    Have ya'll seen these photos? I know it's not Eel but it's a pretty canoe yawl. Be sure to look for the construction pictures. That's what I was looking for when I found these photos online.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/dickw/albums/with/165297

    I wonder if this guy is a member on here?
    Yes but I don’t check in so often lately due to various distractions.

    FYI Constance is for sale by her second owner, we each had 5 or 6 years’ fun with her. Based Walton, Essex. I can put you in touch if interested. Beautiful looker and performer.

    I am in the process of revamping the Albert Strange Association website and merging in related stuff like the Canoe Yawl site so everything will be in one handy place.

  31. #31

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Dick Wynne, thanks for commenting! and thanks for allowing access to your photos on Flickr. Photos like that really help people like me who really need to be able to see something to learn about it. I've been really smitten by the designs I've been looking at recently that are inspired by the canoe shape. If I felt like it was practical to go with a heavier boat, I'd build something like Constance instead of Eel. I like Eel because I feel like her size would be light enough for me to transport on a trailer pulled by my Toyota Tacoma to lakes that have some really shallow areas I want to explore, preferably without the use of a motor.

    Another boat that's really caught my attention, is Pax, a Spitsgatter, owned by Kaci Cronkhite in Port Townsend, WA. If I'm successful at building my first boat, which looks to be Eel, my next project just might be a Spitsgatter like Pax. If you haven't watched the video of her demonstrating her boat, you should watch it.

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Pax is a gorgeous boat and her book is a fun read. Not the most trailerable, though

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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden



    George as drawn,

    1. The 'keel shoe' might one day be a cause for cussing when getting her on or off a trailer. It will also cause turbulence. It's sometimes used to lower the centerboard an inch or two, but Garden hasn't done that.

    2. The rudder, in a cassette, puts her minimum draft far greater that it should be for her type and use. A lifting rudder or fixed rudder level to the keel (board up) would be far preferable.

    3. She is a lovely thing. But fundamentally, a boat with an absolute waterline under 15ft, does not need 7 spars to make it go. That collection will reduce her performance and makes her dangerously close to a caricature.

    4. The aft waterlines are (Danish) very full in an attempt to improve sail carrying ability with what is a small double ender but this leads to a wide, higher exit angle. The water will detatch and become turbulent from about station 6 back. If you look at this picture (again she is a beautifull boat...) in light air and flat water you can see the detatchment and that wide trail of turbulent water. That is non laminar flow, even at low speeds, becasue she is less fore and aft balanced than she might be. She would be better being a longer boat for her displacement, and with a more balanced fore and aft waterline for low speed non heeled sailing.





    Exceptionally good as she is, personally now in 2018, I would argue that Oughtred's Kotik (though slightly bigger) is a better boat of this 'Eel' type, as it addresses these issues and still also looks superb.

    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 07-09-2018 at 08:34 AM.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Edward,

    thanks for your post. As always, I learn a lot from your analysis. Kotik looks stunning.

    I used to think I wanted exactly these kinds of boats (Eel type small cabin boats). But honestly, I think a small light open boat with a good boom tent is a better experience for me. That is probably to some degree a rationalization of what I can and do already have! But my beach cruiser has a longer waterline and full standing headroom throughout (until I put up the boom tent...)

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  35. #35

    Default Re: Canoe Yawl, design by William Garden

    Edward, is this the same boat design at the link below?

    http://myway22ft.blogspot.com/

    I'm glad you brought this to my attention. This weekend when I was working on lofting the boat, I did notice a few things in the drawings I didn't like. One of them, like you say, is the way the keel was designed. The other, and I may be overthinking this, is the way the sheer looks when viewed as looking at the stern and beyond. This is only my second boat to loft but one thing I learned in lofting the Herreshoff 12-1/2 was that getting the defining lines like the sheer right was most important right at the start. As a result, I now loft all the defining lines first in all views and check them for fairness and to see how they look. A little trick I learned was when reconciling the views in the body plan, you can draw the entire sheer on one side of the centerline and see how it looks from the stern. I did this with Eel, and the area around Station 7 appears to create a hump, unlike the Herreshoff 12-1/2 that seemed to flow better and have a more pleasing look. Also, when I watched a video and looked at pictures of Pax, the Spitsgatter, I noticed her sheer also has that clean flow to it. I don't have enough experience to know if that will actually look that way after the boat is built or not though. Maybe it's just my inexperience making me think it could be an issue. The other thing is that the sheer, as drawn in the plan view from the table of offsets, runs almost parallel to the buttocks for a long ways making it look like it has a flat spot. This is where the tumblehome occurs. In Mr. Garden's lines in his plan you can even see the "humps" between stations S and 7, and 1 and 2. There are some issues with the table of offsets but nothing that can't be faired easily. For example, some points in the table of offsets that specifically call out where a buttock passes through a waterline/station intersection are slightly off in the plan view where that same waterline is specifically called out to intersection with that buttock/station just slightly off to one side of the buttock. This happens at two points on WL18/B24. That's another thing I learned while lofting the Herreshoff 12 1/2, was to check the profile plan and body plan against each other after drawing in the curved buttocks and curved waterlines, BEFORE reconciling them in the body plan. That can solve most of the out of fairness before even drawing the stations into the body plan. Having said all that, the photos I've seen of Eel present a really nice looking boat that is below 1500 lbs displacement, has the shallow draft I'm looking for, and provides a cabin just big enough to get out of the weather and maybe camp overnight in.

    Where can I find drawings of Oughtred's Kotik, and can it be carvel planked? That's something I really prefer too. Lapstrake planked hulls, I've heard, are more noisy. A few other members on here have sent me messages advising me to keep my options open and consider other designs before I start construction. None pointed out issues other than the cabin providing less room than some other designs.

    It'll be a while before I do start construction on a boat so I have some time to look around more. I really like the look of the double enders. The Spitsgatter, Pax, that I was referring to earlier really gets me excited but that boat obviously does not fit the parameters I have. I've looked at drawings of a Spitsgatter that I found online and have fantasized about taking those drawings and lofting a scaled down version, but I know I am not experienced enough to competently make corrections to the scaled down version that would account for it being smaller. Also, even scaled down, the displacement and draft would not fit my parameters.

    Thanks for the feedback! I want this type of feedback so I can consider things I may not be experienced enough to think about.

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