Results 1 to 26 of 26

Thread: Tips for anchoring out?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,585

    Default Tips for anchoring out?

    After three years of thinking about it, I finally sailed down to Blakely Harbor, anchored and spent the night. Fun fast twilight sail down (not very far away from my home base of Eagle Harbor) dropped the anchor in about 10 feet of water, made tea, grabbed a book and settled in to see how it all shook out. Well, it turns out that in the absence of wind Marianita ( Iain Oughtred Eun Mara) likes to settle in beam-to whatever the wave pattern happens to be. Much like the following photo from this morning:


    There were indications a light breeze was working it's way up the harbor so I set the mizzen hoping for a vane effect, it hadn't arrived yet. You can see the wave pattern though, makes for a restless night wallowing in those little troughs with the water sloshing in the bilgeboard cases, leaving the boards down does dampen some of the roll but I was corkscrewing around all night. Still a bit wobbly on dry land this afternoon but that seems to happen after a long time on the water. None of the other boats out there were wandering around like we were, though I was the furthest up-harbor so probably felt less breeze than they were seeing.

    Is this just a function of being a small relatively light boat? I have noticed that with just the mizzen up and the helm lashed she settles in about 30 degrees off the wind, the combination of furled jib and mainmast must have just enough windage to bring the bow around. Do I just need to drop a stern anchor in these conditions?
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Southampton Ont. Canada
    Posts
    6,324

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    You might try tying a rolling hitch on the rode and snubbing the other end on a midships cleat(windward side),shortening it until she rides nicely.
    Sinking a bucket or anchor off the stern,just above the bottom, can also provide some relief from sailing at anchor.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    15,317

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    booze helps...a lot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    45,669

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    I live on a much larger boat so non-esistance waves like pictured would not matter. But on wee boats, i found that if I could sleep on the floorboards, right over the bilges, the motion was comfortable. Especially (this was when I was a teen) there was another body . . .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,808

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    I am well past my teens and still appreciate a warm feminine body alongside. There are times when there is little or no wind, and still a bit of sea or swell running that nearly every boat will be somewhat uncomfortable, either sailing or at anchor.
    Ian suggestion is exactly what I do, at least when I am single handing...(mostly)..sleep on the floor between the berths. This is very close to the centre of the roll, so the motion will be pretty benign compared to reclining some distance away from the centre of gyration.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,545

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Rocker stoppers.

    https://www.google.ca/search?q=rocke...=1530768141469

    You could probably make your own with plastic pail covers or plywood with a pvc pipe up through the middle, or maybe a simple weighted collapsible drogue off of each side would do it.

    https://www.google.ca/search?tbm=isc....0.J6zJIJhCnVo
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 07-05-2018 at 12:44 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Olympia, WA, USA
    Posts
    2,251

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Is this just a function of being a small relatively light boat?
    I anchored in Blakely Harbor last year on my way north to the Pocket Yacht Palooza. For all that it looks like it should be a lovely snug cove, it was a miserable anchorage.

    Rolly as all get out even in a calm --and Bucephalus carries 3'4" draft and displaces 3000#; I got tossed about quite unpleasantly. There's a serious kelp bottom in the depth/scope we needed to be sure we A) wouldn't ground out at low tide and B) wouldn't swing into the shore (that cussed power cable area makes the best part of the cove unuseable), and with the tide/current eddies, we ended up orbitting around our anchor. I set a stern anchor, but between the kelp and the eddies wandering us about and snubbing us up hard on one anchor or the other, I got nervous enough about the holding to wait until after dusk, up anchor, and borrow an empty mooring for the night. Being on a mooring didn't help a whit about the rollyness; even with my bunk only 6" above the cabin sole, sleeping was pretty poor.

    So between the lack of wind in the cove, the tide eddies that'll swing you every which way, and the cove magically collecting every ripple from Everett to Tacoma, I don't think hanging a bucket astern or setting a riding sail will do a lick of good, regardless of how well they would work darn near anywhere else. If you try something like "Flopper Stoppers", let me know how they work. In the meantime, as pretty as it is I plan to avoid the place. I was significantly more comfortable for the hours I spent becalmed the next day, hanging on a mooring north of Yeomalt Point, far more exposed. Maybe next time I'll come pester you in Eagle Harbor...

    Sorry I don't have any solution.

    Alex

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,923

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    No suggestions on anchoring techniques here but can I suggest Manzanita or Port Madison for your next outing? Both are lovely anchorages in my experience. Although I'm speaking from the experience of larger boats here, and what is lovely for a 40' power boat might be less so for something smaller.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    16,837

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Did you try dropping a board? We have a similar situation at our mooring field. The sailboats all point to the current, not to the wind.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Lenox, MA/Vineyard Haven, MA
    Posts
    885

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    I lived on a boat for about 30 months altogether, and some nights you just can't win. The worst ones were as you described, where the wind would drop, the tide would swing the boat parallel to a tiny little ripple coming in

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    914

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    You need to add a stern anchor.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Oriental, NC USA
    Posts
    4,709

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    The plain fact is that boats like to lay beam on to waves. Unless there is some wind or current to make the boat do otherwise, it will always lay beam on to the waves. Flopper stoppers do work but not all that well for the small motions induced by waves like these. In these conditions, the beat method is probably to unbalance or heel the boat to one side. Not a sure cure but will reduce the motion. Many solutions offered are for more normal wind or current conditions and have no effect in this situation.

    Of course, you can force the boat to lay as you wish by using bow and stern anchors.
    Tom L

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,099

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    I second a small 'lunch hook' off the stern if you can.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    15,525

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    As above, two anchors. For tidal spots the larger Anchor Buddy "bungee" system works well, too.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,180

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    No answer to the dilemma but, in a misery-loves-company sort of way, I can relate a similar experience.

    Exactly a year ago, to the day, I was coming south out of the end of the Grenville Channel on the north coast, trying to make Hartley Bay. It was getting dark, near nine thirty and it had been a very, very long day. I had been rowing or sailing hard to windward since seven that morning. It took me an hour and a half rowing hard in a three foot confused chop in Wright Sound, after the wind died, to work my way the mile and a half around Sainty and Waterman Points into the beginning of Coghlan Anchorage. Once around Waterman, the water immediately smoothed out, thankfully, but it was another couple of miles to Otter Shoals, the likeliest anchorage.

    It was another few miles to Hartley but I was completely done. With a waxing moon following the sun down the pale blue sky above the distant mountains of Gil Island, it should have been an idyllic night. After I got anchored, the smooth water in the anchorage became unsettled as ripples and a whisper of a breeze from Wright Sound worked their way in. I set the mizzen sail and sheeted it in hard, which usually works to weathercock the boat, but there wasn’t quite enough breeze for that to work this time. Fire-Drake tugged at her anchor first one side and then the other and the ripples set the boat to rocking. It was uncomfortable but, down snug on the floorboards, I dropped off to sleep anyway.

    Exhaustion will do that for you.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    21,409

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Some tips on anchoring can be gained from reading this delightful swashbuckler... really.
    In rough anchorages I have resorted to the techniques used to aim a "bomb ketch" with good success.



    The Commodore (published 1945), a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester, features several actions by British bomb vessels. The text includes a highly detailed account of the procedures used to load the mortars and aim, which involved anchoring fore-and-aft, receiving range corrections from another vessel, precisely adjusting the aim using an anchor cable attached to a windlass, and by using fine adjustments in the amount of gun powder to correct the range. However, Forester erred in describing the vessels as ketches, which by the early 19th century had been replaced by full-rigged ships, and in assigning the management of the mortars to Naval officers, rather than the Royal Marine Artillery which had been formed for this specific purpose. A later book, Hornblower in the West Indies, features a small portable "ship's mortar" mounted in a boat, used to bombard a target during a riverine operation.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bomb_vessel

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,808

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    I have never bothered to do this but I suspect that putting a bridle on the anchor, changing the attitude of the boat relative to the waves might be all that is needed.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Olympia, WA, USA
    Posts
    2,251

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    A stern anchor will not correct a boat's tendency to lie abeam to the wave direction in an anchorage unless both warps are drawn taut and perpendicular to the wave crests and tended to hold the boat thus. As soon as the tide drops and the warps go slack, the boat will still try and swing parallel to the crests --as I experienced in that exact harbor. In the anchorage Stromborg describes, the waves come from all sorts of different angles, too. What's more, in that anchorage the tide eddies and wind eddies (what wind gets in there bounces around off the trees on the shore) will cause a boat to hunt, lie abeam to the waves, and snub against both warps, which is jarring for the crew as well as for the anchor's holding ability.

    A stern anchor is not a universal panacea. Maybe in anchorages where there's no current or wind a stern anchor would do some good, but I doubt there's anything that can make that specific harbor comfortable for a small boat, and I doubt that harbor is the only one of its ilk.

    Alex

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    15,317

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    The worst motion I ever had on a boat was being becalmed for days behind some Caribbean island on an engineless boat.
    I spent day and night in the inflatable, tied to the stern.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    914

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Wave refraction? Combined with resonance? Too much rum? Too little rum?

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,585

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    That's a really shame because it is such a pretty little spot. Timing is crucial getting in and out of Eagle Harbor, there are significant shoals to skirt that require a hard turn to starboard as you clear the mouth and the channel is frequently filled with one of the two ferries that run every 40 minutes or so to Seattle and back or some other pleasure craft making their way between the ferries as well. Last Tuesday, with a favorable wind I was able to motor for about 5 minutes, just enough to get clear of the marina, out of traffic to hoist sails and head out about 1900. With Marianita's shallow draft, depth sounder and a following wind I was able to run along the shore until clear of the ferry lanes for a glorious broad reach towards Blakey Rock with one jibe to head into the harbor. I wasn't paying too much attention (and I am horrible about noting things in my ships log) but it was probably 90 minutes from slipping the docklines to setting anchor. A potentially perfect little getaway! Port Madison and Manzanita are both dead upwind with our prevailing northerlies so they will require a bit more forethought.

    Taking today as fairly average, Blakely Harbor has a tidal range of about 9 feet so setting a stern anchor would also require a fair amount of tending, maybe enough to stay up all night anyway? My berths are set up so I sleep on the centerline right at the waterline and maybe 9" above the keel. Getting lower isn't really an option with the rest of the construction. I will definitely be trying this again and try out some of the suggestions including going somewhere else. I have spent a fair number of nights aboard in association the PTWBF and have been quite comfortable, though as Bruce points out booze may have been a contributing factor in PT.

    Thanks for all the ideas
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Newport, OR
    Posts
    400

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Either two anchors or an anchor and a shore tie, perpendicular to the tiny chop.

    But Wizbang wins this thread.
    F/V No Quarter
    1973 Grand Banks 42 Troller

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Auckland ,N.Z.
    Posts
    24,921

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    flopper stoppers don't stop the roll generally , but they do break the cycle and turn a 10 roll bucket fest into a 3 roll and slow.


    I have a diving triangle which works ok , but for weight and room we just used our drogue with a weight belt tied on last years cruise.
    Surprisingly it worked nearly as well if not better. Something like that would be an easy addition to a small boat and have some other uses , fishing maybe....

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,854

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    A hanging cot is the logical answer!

    I use a spring on an anchor line quite often to point into a swell, but it only works if the wind is steady. And I sail in Lake Huron -- no tides.

    For a very small boat -- put a stern line to shore, or a stern anchor in very shallow water. Find an eddy away from the tidal stream.

    But some places, some nights, you just roll. Nature conspires.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2,421

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    You need to add a stern anchor.
    Yep, they work brilliantly a lot of the time. Our old cruising ground was open to the almost eternal groundswell of the Tasman Sea and the 28'er has little form stability and therefore rolls at anchor a lot, but as soon as we put out a stern anchor we would roll less than boats of six times the displacement. Eventually we basically used one at every stop.
    Last edited by Chris249; 07-15-2018 at 09:23 PM.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Shoreline, Washington
    Posts
    2,297

    Default Re: Tips for anchoring out?

    Interesting, I don't remember blakely harbor being uncomfortable. Stopped there for the first time last season (or was it the season before . . .). I was tooling around in Tim's 18 which means I slept on the floorboards. Stretched my legs on the small beach and park at the base of the bay. It was nice.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •